Reminder: iWork '09 & some iMovie files won't work in macOS Catalina

Posted:
in General Discussion edited June 19
If you've been hanging on to a popular version of Pages, Numbers, and Keynote, or have some iMovie files relying on older plugins, time's up. You're going to have to take some steps in order to move to macOS Catalina.

If that Pages icon (left) is what you see every time you switch on your Mac, we have some bad news for you
If that Pages icon (left) is what you see every time you switch on your Mac, we have some bad news for you


The forthcoming macOS Catalina will not run Apple's old iWork '09 apps, and nor will its version of iMovie load certain older types of files. It's due to Catalina's dropping of support for 32-bit apps but Apple says users can update to the latest versions of the iWork apps in order to carry on working with their existing documents.

However, iWork '09 is more significant than its age suggests. Normally you wouldn't expect any company to support software from a decade ago, but the '09 suite is famously the one before Apple radically revised Pages, Numbers and Keynote.

In 2013, Apple rewrote its iWork apps from scratch and introduced new versions for the Mac and iPad. As it had done with video editing tool, Final Cut Pro X in 2011, Apple made a new version of iWork that was better in many ways but lacked a lot of existing significant features.

Numbers lost various spreadsheet cell management options, for instance, plus some row sorting features. Pages lost its mail merge and format bar.

In the years since, Apple has slowly added back most of the missing features -- but not all. Six years on from this iWork 2013 release, Pages has still not got its outlining feature back.

Consequently, some users have stuck with iWork '09 through thick and thin, but now Apple says they will have to update if they're to use macOS Catalina.

Old video files

The changes to iMovie for macOS Catalina are less significant, but they may still be problematic.

While the issue is again related to Catalina's dropping of 32-bit apps, iMovie itself is not affected. What may be an issue is what Apple calls incompatible media files.

These were mainly, but not exclusively, created using the old QuickTime 7. Even though Apple itself has moved on from QuickTime 7, it kept supporting it for compatibility right up to macOS Mojave, but no more.

Since QuickTime 7 is old, though, you can use iMovie on macOS Mojave to see whether you have any incompatible media files. Open the app and then try to import media.

You'll get a window listing all the incompatible media and there's a Convert button. Click that and your files are converted to H.264 to be playable on Catalina.

This all supposes that you have all of your old media in one place, though, and that you go through this process before upgrading to macOS Catalina.

Apple maintains a comprehensive list of which video formats will still work in iMovie in Catalina, and which ones won't.

As well as the consumer iWork '09, macOS Catalina is also going to see the final end of Apple's pro-photography software, Aperture. While it was discontinued in 2015, it's been supported through the different macOS releases since then, but Aperture will cease to work with Catalina.

Comments

  • Reply 1 of 12
    SpamSandwichSpamSandwich Posts: 31,197member
    iMovie on Mac was dead to me for years and the iWork trio is only used on my iPad now. Good thing.
  • Reply 2 of 12
    Mike WuertheleMike Wuerthele Posts: 4,649administrator
    iMovie on Mac was dead to me for years and the iWork trio is only used on my iPad now. Good thing.
    FWIW, specifically, this is iWork '09's problem and some very old plugins for iMovie. Newer versions are fine.
    SpamSandwich
  • Reply 3 of 12
    lkrupplkrupp Posts: 7,162member
    I can’t help but think the upgrade to Catalina is going to cause massive disruptions for a lot of people. Try as you might to inform and disseminate the fact that 32 bit apps will stop working with Catalina there will be millions of users who blissfully upgrade to Catalina only to find out they’re screwed. We see it every day in the Apple discussion forums even now. A user updates an app or macOS and finds something is broken. Then argument starts about who’s fault it is, Apple or the developer. For example, I use Epson and HP printers and some of both are still using 32 bit drivers according to System Report. I’m hoping both manufacturers update their drivers and utility apps before Catalina lands. This is one time I might sit back and watch the fireworks before moving ahead.
    dewmewilliamlondonplanetary paul
  • Reply 4 of 12
    lkrupp said:
    I can’t help but think the upgrade to Catalina is going to cause massive disruptions for a lot of people. Try as you might to inform and disseminate the fact that 32 bit apps will stop working with Catalina there will be millions of users who blissfully upgrade to Catalina only to find out they’re screwed. We see it every day in the Apple discussion forums even now. A user updates an app or macOS and finds something is broken. Then argument starts about who’s fault it is, Apple or the developer. For example, I use Epson and HP printers and some of both are still using 32 bit drivers according to System Report. I’m hoping both manufacturers update their drivers and utility apps before Catalina lands. This is one time I might sit back and watch the fireworks before moving ahead.
    Waiting might be the intelligent thing to do but no guts no glory is better :-)
    FileMakerFeller
  • Reply 5 of 12
    This is why I keep an old Macbook around that's running Mavericks and loaded with older apps.
    buzdots
  • Reply 6 of 12
    dewmedewme Posts: 2,099member
    lkrupp said:
    I can’t help but think the upgrade to Catalina is going to cause massive disruptions for a lot of people. Try as you might to inform and disseminate the fact that 32 bit apps will stop working with Catalina there will be millions of users who blissfully upgrade to Catalina only to find out they’re screwed. We see it every day in the Apple discussion forums even now. A user updates an app or macOS and finds something is broken. Then argument starts about who’s fault it is, Apple or the developer. For example, I use Epson and HP printers and some of both are still using 32 bit drivers according to System Report. I’m hoping both manufacturers update their drivers and utility apps before Catalina lands. This is one time I might sit back and watch the fireworks before moving ahead.
    Exactly. I’m very interested to see how Apple handles the upgrade process. I hope they have some sort of preinstallation scanner to let users know which applications are going to be impacted by the upgrade before the user decides to go ahead with the upgrade. Yeah, Apple does give Mojave users a one-time warning when they launch an app that will be deprecated post Mojave. But that was many months ago and memories fade. In any case, will be nice to know how the 32-bit culling will physically take place. 

    By the way, I did attempt to upgrade to Catalina Beta from the latest Mojave beta on a test 2013 MacBook 13” retina. Total disaster. Had to do a scorched earth wipe and full recovery rollback and app reinstalls. Even Time Machine would not restore my previous configuration. I could totally afford this because it’s a test machine but I’d be extremely cautious about messing around with beta stuff unless you can afford to lose everything on the machine and have more than one recovery model in place. Time Machine alone is insufficient. 
  • Reply 7 of 12
    tyler82tyler82 Posts: 869member
    Appropriate that Apple chose a disconnected island as their mascot for the new Mac OS.
    arthurbaradarthekat
  • Reply 8 of 12
    rain22rain22 Posts: 35member
    tyler82 said:
    Appropriate that Apple chose a disconnected island as their mascot for the new Mac OS.

    Lol. On another note - I wish Apple would give the iWork suite some love. Pages is absolutely brutal, but has so much potential. I’m wondering if patents are what’s keeping it in its awkward state.
  • Reply 9 of 12
    buzdotsbuzdots Posts: 451member
    rain22 said:
    I wish Apple would give the iWork suite some love. Pages is absolutely brutal, but has so much potential. I’m wondering if patents are what’s keeping it in its awkward state.
    Hadn't thought of patents as an excuse...  But Pages has become a p-poor excuse of its former self, certainly not the "word processing" application of before.  Once they did away with mail merge it was useless as a business app.
  • Reply 10 of 12
    arthurbaarthurba Posts: 106member
    For years and years now the only use of a new version of Linux or Windows was to install VMware on and run your older version of Windows or Linux within it.  Mac OS is going the same way.  

    I intend to buy the new Mac Pro and run Catalina with the latest VMWare Fusion and my current Sierra in a VM.

    I’ll do ‘new’ things in the native Catalina, like new XCode apps for Mac and iOS - but CS6 and even old Xcode dev will stay in Sierra virtualised.  I already do this with even older Mac OS 10.9 virtualised under 10.12. 

    Safari and Mail etc. can run natively in Catalina - but I’m not worried about Catalina not supporting QuickTime 7 because it will continue to run under Sierra just fine in a VM.

    For internal company reasons I stick to VMware - but Parallels or VirtualBox or whatever can be used the same way. 
  • Reply 11 of 12
    This is not nearly as big of an issue as some make it out to be. The majority of people still using these versions of the apps are using it on hardware that can’t be upgraded to Catalina in the first place.
  • Reply 12 of 12
    MacProMacPro Posts: 18,309member
    lkrupp said:
    I can’t help but think the upgrade to Catalina is going to cause massive disruptions for a lot of people. Try as you might to inform and disseminate the fact that 32 bit apps will stop working with Catalina there will be millions of users who blissfully upgrade to Catalina only to find out they’re screwed. We see it every day in the Apple discussion forums even now. A user updates an app or macOS and finds something is broken. Then argument starts about who’s fault it is, Apple or the developer. For example, I use Epson and HP printers and some of both are still using 32 bit drivers according to System Report. I’m hoping both manufacturers update their drivers and utility apps before Catalina lands. This is one time I might sit back and watch the fireworks before moving ahead.
    Yep, you're right I am sure.  That's why I always tell all my not so techy Mac user friends to buy Carbon Copy Cloner and an SSD the same size as their internal boot drive (if possible or an HDD is it's too big to be cost-effective) and clone their working boot drive before updating to a new OS.  I also always keep a VMWare VM of the existing OS prior to any update too, I have all the Mac OS version that run in a VM on an external.  It's proven vital in such cases as the Fujitsu Scan Snap that won't work post Sierra.
    edited June 21
Sign In or Register to comment.