Survey finds reliability is the reason workers choose Mac

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in General Discussion
Jamf, a company that helps businesses manage Apple integration in businesses, has shown that Mac's reliability is a top reason employees prefer using Mac in the workplace.

Survey shows why end users prefer mac


In 2018, Jamf -- an Apple-focused, Wisconsin-based technology management company -- conducted a survey of their customers that showed enterprise IT workers strongly preferred Mac. The survey had shown that when participants were given the choice to choose the type of device they were allowed to use at work, 72 percent chose Mac.

For 2019, Jamf surveyed end users to figure out why they consistently choose Mac and what their experiences have been as a result of their choice. The survey was conducted by a third party market research company, Vanson Bourne, and was contracted by Jamf in collaboration with Apple.

The findings reveal that Mac users experience high levels of employee satisfaction, productivity, and collaboration in business sectors. The survey was conducted on a broad range of departments, including information technology, human resources, marketing, engineering, sales, business development, and more.

By the end of 2018, Jamf managed 48 percent more Mac than it did at the end of 2017.

According to the survey, across most departments, the number one reason for choosing Mac was often that users had a strong preference for Apple products. The second highest reason cited was that end users simply felt that Mac was more reliable than other computers. End users also often stated that a Mac worked the best with applications and resources they needed to effectively do their jobs.

Other reasons included overall ease of use, a preference for the user interface and design, and the ability to seamlessly connect with Apple devices they already owned.

As a result of using Mac, 97 percent of polled users claimed increased productivity, 95 percent claimed increased creativity, 94 percent felt Mac enabled them to be more self-sufficient, and 91% found that Mac increased collaboration.

When asked if workers felt as though they would be unable to do their job effectively without a Mac, 79 percent agreed. This was especially true of workers in Human Resources and Information Technology.

Reliability was also a key reason for Mac preference in the workplace. 40 percent of survey respondents had reported no issues with their Mac in the last 12 months, with 70 percent reporting two or fewer issues. 74 percent of users who previously used a PC for work said they experienced fewer issues now than when using a Mac.

74 percent of users experience fewer issues on Mac with PC


80 percent of users polled were users who had used a PC before a Mac. Only 7 percent of respondents felt as though they experienced more issues with Mac than PC.

Jamf has also conducted a survey that has shown that most students would use a Mac if price was not a factor.
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Comments

  • Reply 1 of 21
    lkrupplkrupp Posts: 7,169member
    Of course this report will be attacked as invalid by the usual suspects here but it puts all the “gates” and screams of Apple ignoring QA into perspective. In the real world Apple is tops in quality and reliability. If you believe all the crap that is spewed in tech blog comment sections you would think Apple is at the bottom of the barrel in those metrics. Nothing could be further from the truth. The hater narrative is confined to blogs like this one. Only here and in the tech media is Apple constantly doomed or condemned to failure. In the real world people use Apple products and are happy with them.
    DAalsethAppleExposedStrangeDayslolliverchasmsteveauwatto_cobrajony0
  • Reply 2 of 21
    deminsddeminsd Posts: 143member
    lkrupp said:
    Of course this report will be attacked as invalid by the usual suspects here but it puts all the “gates” and screams of Apple ignoring QA into perspective. In the real world Apple is tops in quality and reliability. If you believe all the crap that is spewed in tech blog comment sections you would think Apple is at the bottom of the barrel in those metrics. Nothing could be further from the truth. The hater narrative is confined to blogs like this one. Only here and in the tech media is Apple constantly doomed or condemned to failure. In the real world people use Apple products and are happy with them.
    So because people disagree with this "fluff" survey we're "the usual suspects"?  Got it.  You're as biased as this survey.

    The way I read it, "a strong preference" is the main reason people buy Mac's.  A strong preference?  Not reliability or speed or value?  

    Where's the Windows users opinions?  Oh...they didn't ask Windows users.  

    I use both Mac and Windows, so I'm not a "usual suspect" but give me more than a survey of only Mac users if you're going to do a survey of satisfaction that insinuates a comparison to Windows users.
    edited June 20 1STnTENDERBITSAppleExposedbigtdsmuthuk_vanalingam
  • Reply 3 of 21
    lkrupplkrupp Posts: 7,169member
    deminsd said:
    lkrupp said:
    Of course this report will be attacked as invalid by the usual suspects here but it puts all the “gates” and screams of Apple ignoring QA into perspective. In the real world Apple is tops in quality and reliability. If you believe all the crap that is spewed in tech blog comment sections you would think Apple is at the bottom of the barrel in those metrics. Nothing could be further from the truth. The hater narrative is confined to blogs like this one. Only here and in the tech media is Apple constantly doomed or condemned to failure. In the real world people use Apple products and are happy with them.
    So because people disagree with this "fluff" survey we're "the usual suspects"?  Got it.  You're as biased as this survey.

    The way I read it, "a strong preference" is the main reason people buy Mac's.  A strong preference?  Not reliability or speed or value?  

    Where's the Windows users opinions?  Oh...they didn't ask Windows users.  

    I use both Mac and Windows, so I'm not a "usual suspect" but give me more than a survey of only Mac users if you're going to do a survey of satisfaction that insinuates a comparison to Windows users.
    Considering your posting history here, yes, you are a usual suspect. In spades.
    tmaymatrix077socalbrianchiaAppleExposedlolliverRayz2016kevin keewatto_cobrajony0
  • Reply 4 of 21
    matrix077matrix077 Posts: 729member
    lkrupp said:
    deminsd said:
    lkrupp said:
    Of course this report will be attacked as invalid by the usual suspects here but it puts all the “gates” and screams of Apple ignoring QA into perspective. In the real world Apple is tops in quality and reliability. If you believe all the crap that is spewed in tech blog comment sections you would think Apple is at the bottom of the barrel in those metrics. Nothing could be further from the truth. The hater narrative is confined to blogs like this one. Only here and in the tech media is Apple constantly doomed or condemned to failure. In the real world people use Apple products and are happy with them.
    So because people disagree with this "fluff" survey we're "the usual suspects"?  Got it.  You're as biased as this survey.

    The way I read it, "a strong preference" is the main reason people buy Mac's.  A strong preference?  Not reliability or speed or value?  

    Where's the Windows users opinions?  Oh...they didn't ask Windows users.  

    I use both Mac and Windows, so I'm not a "usual suspect" but give me more than a survey of only Mac users if you're going to do a survey of satisfaction that insinuates a comparison to Windows users.
    Considering your posting history here, yes, you are a usual suspect. In spades.
    Ha Ha. Burnt. 
    AppleExposedseanjRayz2016kevin keewatto_cobrajony0
  • Reply 5 of 21
    deminsd said:
    lkrupp said:
    Of course this report will be attacked as invalid by the usual suspects here but it puts all the “gates” and screams of Apple ignoring QA into perspective. In the real world Apple is tops in quality and reliability. If you believe all the crap that is spewed in tech blog comment sections you would think Apple is at the bottom of the barrel in those metrics. Nothing could be further from the truth. The hater narrative is confined to blogs like this one. Only here and in the tech media is Apple constantly doomed or condemned to failure. In the real world people use Apple products and are happy with them.
    So because people disagree with this "fluff" survey we're "the usual suspects"?  Got it.  You're as biased as this survey.

    The way I read it, "a strong preference" is the main reason people buy Mac's.  A strong preference?  Not reliability or speed or value?  

    Where's the Windows users opinions?  Oh...they didn't ask Windows users.  

    I use both Mac and Windows, so I'm not a "usual suspect" but give me more than a survey of only Mac users if you're going to do a survey of satisfaction that insinuates a comparison to Windows users.
    There is a distinct possibility that the results are skewed because Jamf deals mostly with Apple devices but you might also consider the possibility that those that were interviewed must have used a windows system at some point in their work life.  
    AppleExposedbigtdslolliverwatto_cobrajony0
  • Reply 6 of 21
    Though the actual survey was conducted by a third party, not Jamf itself, according to 9to5Mac. Which keeps it from being directly biased by Jamf. 
    edited June 20 AppleExposedlolliverwatto_cobra
  • Reply 7 of 21
    therfmantherfman Posts: 50member
    40 percent of survey respondents had reported no issues with their Mac in the last 12 months, with 70 percent reporting two or fewer issues.

    We love our macs 110%!
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 8 of 21
    Though the actual survey was conducted by a third party, not Jamf itself, according to 9to5Mac. Which keeps it from being directly biased by Jamf. 
    That's an incorrect conclusion.  Jamf commissioned a survey that shines a positive light on products that directly affect their financial prosperity.  Of course the survey is biased.  It's meant to be biased.  It's a marketing piece for Jamf.  There's nothing wrong with that.  Jamf isn't claiming scientific facts or impartiality with the survey.  They're simply trying to reinforce the positive associations the Mac users they surveyed already have with their choice of Macs as computers.  The survey was always going to be positive because that's what it was designed to be... a positive marketing tool.  It's a smart, proven, and dead simple technique that is used all the time.  

    The problem occurs when forum type people try to pin more meaning to the survey.   "Jamf sucks.  They're just trying to trick you into buying machines that they support."  No they don't, and no they aren't.  On the other side of that coin: "This proves that Macs are better than PC's and anyone that says differently is just a hater"  No it does not, and no they aren't.  ← That's just dummies spouting dumb stuff.  

    The survey is just effective marketing.  Nothing more.
     
    FileMakerFeller
  • Reply 9 of 21
    zoetmbzoetmb Posts: 2,473member
    lkrupp said:
    Of course this report will be attacked as invalid by the usual suspects here but it puts all the “gates” and screams of Apple ignoring QA into perspective. In the real world Apple is tops in quality and reliability. If you believe all the crap that is spewed in tech blog comment sections you would think Apple is at the bottom of the barrel in those metrics. Nothing could be further from the truth. The hater narrative is confined to blogs like this one. Only here and in the tech media is Apple constantly doomed or condemned to failure. In the real world people use Apple products and are happy with them.
    You don't have to believe that "Apple is at the bottom of the barrel in those metrics" or claim that "Apple is doomed" to also recognize that the quality level of Apple's products has declined over the years.   My son-in-law does Mac support and while this is anecdotal, he sees Mac component failures on a daily basis - if he didn't, he wouldn't have a lot of work.   Personally, I never had a single problem with a G4 tower (still working fine when I got rid of it in 2008) or my late 2008 Mac Book Pro (which finally did die - probably a power supply failure in 2017).   However, my early 2017 MBP had a massive video failure (fixed under warranty) and the tops of many keys have worn away.   It has never had good battery life - about the best I've gotten while using the machine is four hours.   IMO, a $3000+ machine in today's market should be just about "perfect". 

    On the OS side, I think things have gotten so unduly complex, we're seeing issues that I've never seen before.  The first time I try to open Excel files from inside the Office file chooser, I can't do it.  I have to back out and go back in and it always works on the second try.   I have constant problems where Safari won't let me type into a site like this one.  Again, I have to quit Safari and go back in and then it works.    Neither of these things happened before an OS update within the last year.   When I do a backup and I see the number of files I have on the machine, it makes no sense to me whatsoever.   There are seemingly millions of overhead and cache files being created that never seem to get cleaned up, occupying tons of storage space.  

    Back in the day, Apple was brilliant at making sure that every bit of text displayed to the user, especially error messages, was clear and intuitive.   I have an old example from the Apple II days where Apple went through eight rounds of revisions on a single question to determine whether or not a user was using a color or monochrome monitor.   They would actually test that with users!    That's not the case today - Apple displays as many useless messages as Microsoft and other companies do.  

    And in spite of all the warnings, just wait until the Fall when 32-bit apps no longer work on the new OS.    They'll be riots in the streets (or at least on postings boards).   IMO, Apple is making a huge mistake by not having some kind of compatibility mode.   

    It's not that I'm giving up on Apple's products (although I've thought about it), but that's mainly because I don't want to use Windows and Android.   But that doesn't mean I'm as happy with Apple as I once was.    And don't get me started on laptops where end-users can no longer replace/upgrade storage, memory and battery (as I could do in my late 2008 MBP).   For a company that claims to be environmentally conscious, this is complete hypocrisy.  
    muthuk_vanalingam
  • Reply 10 of 21
    DAalsethDAalseth Posts: 689member
    When I was doing IT work I always joked that they paid me to fix Windows machines, and I used the money to buy Macs. Why? Because I didn't want to spend my off hours fixing my computer.
    StrangeDayslolliverchasmwatto_cobra
  • Reply 11 of 21
    AppleExposedAppleExposed Posts: 1,404unconfirmed, member
    In other news humans prefer pleasure to pain, fish prefer the ocean to desert and workers prefer higher pay.


    lkrupp said:
    Of course this report will be attacked as invalid by the usual suspects here but it puts all the “gates” and screams of Apple ignoring QA into perspective. In the real world Apple is tops in quality and reliability. If you believe all the crap that is spewed in tech blog comment sections you would think Apple is at the bottom of the barrel in those metrics. Nothing could be further from the truth. The hater narrative is confined to blogs like this one. Only here and in the tech media is Apple constantly doomed or condemned to failure. In the real world people use Apple products and are happy with them.

    deminsd said:
    So because people disagree with this "fluff" survey we're "the usual suspects"?  Got it.  You're as biased as this survey.

    The way I read it, "a strong preference" is the main reason people buy Mac's.  A strong preference?  Not reliability or speed or value?  

    Where's the Windows users opinions?  Oh...they didn't ask Windows users.  

    I use both Mac and Windows, so I'm not a "usual suspect" but give me more than a survey of only Mac users if you're going to do a survey of satisfaction that insinuates a comparison to Windows users.
    StrangeDaysseanjlolliverwatto_cobra
  • Reply 12 of 21
    StrangeDaysStrangeDays Posts: 8,306member
    DAalseth said:
    When I was doing IT work I always joked that they paid me to fix Windows machines, and I used the money to buy Macs. Why? Because I didn't want to spend my off hours fixing my computer.
    Hah, love it. Have been in a similar position.
    lolliverwatto_cobra
  • Reply 13 of 21
    dewmedewme Posts: 2,125member
    DAalseth said:
    When I was doing IT work I always joked that they paid me to fix Windows machines, and I used the money to buy Macs. Why? Because I didn't want to spend my off hours fixing my computer.
    Same here. Life is too short to get pulled into the Windows time suck vortex on your own time.

    It's too bad that laypeople often cite Macs as being too expensive. I doubt they are looking at the lifetime costs of total cost of ownership, including the cost of down time, and are only looking at acquisition costs. I don't have an exhaustive sample size, but of the people I've seen buy Windows PCs versus Macs for their college-bound kids, those who paid a little more for the Macs got through their kids college years with the same Mac they started with while the Windows PC buyers typically needed two or more machines to make it to the end. This may be purely circumstantial, or perhaps those poor young souls who had to settle for Windows PCs got so frustrated with their machines and Windows that they beat the damn things to death. You never know, unless you check for hammer marks, concrete dust, and footprints. 
    edited June 20 seanjlolliverwatto_cobra
  • Reply 14 of 21
    AppleExposedAppleExposed Posts: 1,404unconfirmed, member
    dewme said:
    DAalseth said:
    When I was doing IT work I always joked that they paid me to fix Windows machines, and I used the money to buy Macs. Why? Because I didn't want to spend my off hours fixing my computer.
    Same here. Life is too short to get pulled into the Windows time suck vortex on your own time.

    It's too bad that laypeople often cite Macs as being too expensive. I doubt they are looking at the lifetime costs of total cost of ownership, including the cost of down time, and are only looking at acquisition costs. I don't have an exhaustive sample size, but of the people I've seen buy Windows PCs versus Macs for their college-bound kids, those who paid a little more for the Macs got through their kids college years with the same Mac they started with while the Windows PC buyers typically needed two or more machines to make it to the end. This may be purely circumstantial, or perhaps those poor young souls who had to settle for Windows PCs got so frustrated with their machines and Windows that they beat the damn things to death. You never know, unless you check for hammer marks, concrete dust, and footprints. 

    I used to fix Windows machines and owned a few. It was TEDIOUS constantly de-fragmenting, running disk cleanup, Malwarebytes anti-malware software and other 3rd party clean up services. I've wasted DAYS just keeping my windows machines up to speed.

    Switched to Mac and all problems were solved. I think I ran a virus scanner one time years ago and it was a joke because nothing was detected. Haven't ran a clean up tool or virus scan on my Mac since about 2010.

    My friend in college knew Macs were better but wanted to "save" money by buying Windows junk. He ended up replacing his machine every 6 months and lost almost all his data. Had he bought a Mac he would have spent the same amount of money(maybe less) and still have his data. I still have my old Macs. One dating from 2009 and running better than new Windows virus-machines.

    Edited for clarity...
    edited June 20 lolliverwatto_cobra
  • Reply 15 of 21
    majorslmajorsl Posts: 119unconfirmed, member
    ...running dick cleanup...
    *giggle* but accurate.
  • Reply 16 of 21
    AppleExposedAppleExposed Posts: 1,404unconfirmed, member
    majorsl said:
    ...running dick cleanup...
    *giggle* but accurate.

    Oops! Not sure if I should leave it or not. it is accurate.

    Decided to edit it so people would know what I'm talking about haha.
    edited June 20
  • Reply 17 of 21
    DAalsethDAalseth Posts: 689member
    dewme said:
    DAalseth said:
    When I was doing IT work I always joked that they paid me to fix Windows machines, and I used the money to buy Macs. Why? Because I didn't want to spend my off hours fixing my computer.
    Same here. Life is too short to get pulled into the Windows time suck vortex on your own time.

    It's too bad that laypeople often cite Macs as being too expensive. I doubt they are looking at the lifetime costs of total cost of ownership, including the cost of down time, and are only looking at acquisition costs. I don't have an exhaustive sample size, but of the people I've seen buy Windows PCs versus Macs for their college-bound kids, those who paid a little more for the Macs got through their kids college years with the same Mac they started with while the Windows PC buyers typically needed two or more machines to make it to the end. This may be purely circumstantial, or perhaps those poor young souls who had to settle for Windows PCs got so frustrated with their machines and Windows that they beat the damn things to death. You never know, unless you check for hammer marks, concrete dust, and footprints. 

    I used to fix Windows machines and owned a few. It was TEDIOUS constantly de-fragmenting, running disk cleanup, Malwarebytes anti-malware software and other 3rd party clean up services. I've wasted DAYS just keeping my windows machines up to speed.

    Switched to Mac and all problems were solved. I think I ran a virus scanner one time years ago and it was a joke because nothing was detected. Haven't ran a clean up tool or virus scan on my Mac since about 2010.

    My friend in college knew Macs were better but wanted to "save" money by buying Windows junk. He ended up replacing his machine every 6 months and lost almost all his data. Had he bought a Mac he would have spent the same amount of money(maybe less) and still have his data. I still have my old Macs. One dating from 2009 and running better than new Windows virus-machines.

    Edited for clarity...
    For a while there became a standing rule: nuke and pave once a year, and more often if the system was acting up. Kruft built up, fragments of malware I ripped out would be left behind. Windows just seemed to break itself after a while. So I just started nuking and paving. You get a bad malware infection? Nuke it. You get a disk so fragmented it took five minutes to boot? Nuke it. You saved all of the pictures from your trip to Italy on your desktop and didn’t back them up ANYWHERE else, and today your system is crashing on startup? Tough, it’s gonna get nuked. You shoulda’ saved your stuff on the network drive like Ive been telling you to. 

    I finally got out of that business. I got too cynical to keep doing it.
    lolliverFileMakerFellerwatto_cobra
  • Reply 18 of 21
    zoetmb said:

    And don't get me started on laptops where end-users can no longer replace/upgrade storage, memory and battery (as I could do in my late 2008 MBP).   For a company that claims to be environmentally conscious, this is complete hypocrisy.  
    I dunno. If there's an efficient recycling system in place then I can see the argument for being environmentally conscious. And it's easy to forget that there are environmental costs for making the equipment expandable in the first place - granted, not as big as the cost of replacing an entire machine from raw materials, but costs nonetheless. I don't know of any independent reporting about the materials cost and re-use proportion within Apple, so we kind of have to take their word for it and trust that their own reporting is genuine.
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 19 of 21
    Rayz2016Rayz2016 Posts: 4,730member
    zoetmb said:

    And don't get me started on laptops where end-users can no longer replace/upgrade storage, memory and battery (as I could do in my late 2008 MBP).   For a company that claims to be environmentally conscious, this is complete hypocrisy.  
    I dunno. If there's an efficient recycling system in place then I can see the argument for being environmentally conscious. And it's easy to forget that there are environmental costs for making the equipment expandable in the first place - granted, not as big as the cost of replacing an entire machine from raw materials, but costs nonetheless. I don't know of any independent reporting about the materials cost and re-use proportion within Apple, so we kind of have to take their word for it and trust that their own reporting is genuine.
    Plenty of info here:

    https://www.apple.com/environment/

    zeotmb regurgitated the same complaint template, so here’s the same template reply:

    Machines that are upgradable are rarely upgraded. Machines that are upgraded are not environmentally friendly because the discarded parts are either dropped in landfills or Indonesia. Apple is being environmentally conscious by ensuring that dumped batteries don’t end up just being … dumped. 
    edited June 21 chasmwatto_cobra
  • Reply 20 of 21
    chasmchasm Posts: 1,649member
    deminsd said:
    The way I read it, "a strong preference" is the main reason people buy Mac's.  A strong preference?  Not reliability or speed or value?
    How stupid do you have to be not to understand that people come by their “strong preference” not from a random coin toss but from their positive experiences which incorporate (but are not limited to) “reliability or speed or value”?

    (checks deminsd’s posting history) ... ah.
    AppleExposedwatto_cobra
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