Apple Watch 'Close Your Rings' page updated with new athlete stories

Posted:
in General Discussion
A trio of new stories have popped up on the Apple Watch "Close Your Rings" page, including ones from a kick boxer, a Nike Run Club coach, and a professional yoga instructor-turned-DJ.

Yoyo S. closes her rings by kickboxing.
Image Credit: Apple


Apple has refreshed its "Close Your Rings" page, highlighting a new set of Apple Watch wearers sharing their stories of closing their rings. Each story is accompanied by a short video highlighting the ways each user works toward meeting their activity goals while wearing their Apple Watch.

The first story focuses on Yoyo S., a kick boxer who sings the praises of the Apple Watch's competitions feature, "With the competitions feature, I can see my friends moving and exercising. It gets me out of bed."

The next story features a yoga instructor, surfer, and DJ named Jessica, who said "The rings turn it into a game. Even if you're not trying to hit a target, you close them just for fun." Her story highlights how the Apple Watch can track all kinds of activity, regardless of whether she's surfing, doing yoga, or dancing while she DJs.

"If you're bored, just move. Jump around. Pick something up and throw it. Enjoy yourself." Says Cory W-M, a Nike Run Club coach. He's the captain of the Track Mafia running club and a fitness instructor and believes in closing his rings every day.

Others featured in the past include Hailey A, a swimmer for the U.S. National team, Jason L., an orchestra conductor, and Eric G, a 65 year old who uses the Apple Watch to track his outdoor walks.

The Apple Watch continues to be an incredibly useful tool to wearers. The Apple Watch has been credited with saving peoples' lives thanks to fall detection, and will soon expand into women's health with menstrual tracker Cycle, set to debut in iOS 13.

Comments

  • Reply 1 of 14
    I find the ring feature really dumb.  I am a cyclist and usually close my exercise ring before getting to work and finish the day between 400-999% of my daily goal.  That makes it useless and I can't change the target level to my level of activity or compare it to other fit cyclist.  I close all my other rings too without even trying that hard.  The thing seems to be set for the average American middle aged overweight couch potato.  They'll have to think it through and redesign it for people who actually exercise regularly before I'll give it the time of day.   
  • Reply 2 of 14
    AppleExposedAppleExposed Posts: 1,672unconfirmed, member
    I find the ring feature really dumb.  I am a cyclist and usually close my exercise ring before getting to work and finish the day between 400-999% of my daily goal.  That makes it useless and I can't change the target level to my level of activity or compare it to other fit cyclist.  I close all my other rings too without even trying that hard.  The thing seems to be set for the average American middle aged overweight couch potato.  They'll have to think it through and redesign it for people who actually exercise regularly before I'll give it the time of day.   

    I thought you could set the level?

    I find that most fitness programs have you reach goals just by living. It's annoying for those who don't drive. Sometimes I'll be sitting down in the middle of the day and get a "congratulations" or something and I'm like "I didn't even do anything today"
    GeorgeBMac
  • Reply 3 of 14
    I find the data reported to often be inaccurate. The AW4 tells me I have already stood for two hours within 15 minutes of putting the watch on for the first time in the day. Sometimes the exercise ring will count off exercise minutes when I am strolling leisurely through a store even though I didn’t officially start a workout. But if I get on a treadmill and really bring my heart rate up it only starts counting after I officially start a workout.
  • Reply 4 of 14
    I find the ring feature really dumb.  I am a cyclist and usually close my exercise ring before getting to work and finish the day between 400-999% of my daily goal.  That makes it useless and I can't change the target level to my level of activity or compare it to other fit cyclist.  I close all my other rings too without even trying that hard.  The thing seems to be set for the average American middle aged overweight couch potato.  They'll have to think it through and redesign it for people who actually exercise regularly before I'll give it the time of day.   

    I thought you could set the level?

    I find that most fitness programs have you reach goals just by living. It's annoying for those who don't drive. Sometimes I'll be sitting down in the middle of the day and get a "congratulations" or something and I'm like "I didn't even do anything today"
    You can’t set the Exercise ring, it’s always 30 minutes.

    I find the data reported to often be inaccurate. The AW4 tells me I have already stood for two hours within 15 minutes of putting the watch on for the first time in the day. Sometimes the exercise ring will count off exercise minutes when I am strolling leisurely through a store even though I didn’t officially start a workout. But if I get on a treadmill and really bring my heart rate up it only starts counting after I officially start a workout.
    It appears by your comment that you may not understand the Stand ring. Credit for 1 hour is earned by Standing (and moving) for 1 minute in that hour. If I put my Apple Watch on at 6:55 am and start my morning routine I will have earned 2 Stand hours by 7:05. That makes sense to me.

    I get Exercise minutes all day long, frequently without starting a workout. If I run up 6 flights of stairs my heart rate increases and I’m getting exercise. The watch counts that without me starting a workout. That also makes sense to me. 

    What I get frustrated with is if I take my dog for a 2 mile walk with my child strapped to my chest and start an Outdoor Walk I’m lucky if I get 5-7 minutes of Exercise. Usually that’s because my pace is a little too slow. But if I walk around the grocery store, trying to “rush”, I’ll get a minute or two.
    StrangeDayslolliverfastasleepmacplusplusGeorgeBMac
  • Reply 5 of 14
    FolioFolio Posts: 652member
    Yes, unlike the other rings, you can change your Move goals. Here's how to change your move goal: Open the Activity app on your Apple Watch. Go to your rings, then firmly press the screen. Tap to increase or decrease the number of active calories for your daily Move goal. Change your nail Move goal: 450 calories. When you're done, tap Update. You can change the Move goal, but not your Exercise or Stand goals.
    lolliverGeorgeBMac
  • Reply 6 of 14
    FolioFolio Posts: 652member
    When I boosted my Move goal (to 800 from 700) Apple burnished my trophy case with a little medal to mark the occasion
    GeorgeBMac
  • Reply 7 of 14
    StrangeDaysStrangeDays Posts: 8,778member
    I find the ring feature really dumb.  I am a cyclist and usually close my exercise ring before getting to work and finish the day between 400-999% of my daily goal.  That makes it useless and I can't change the target level to my level of activity or compare it to other fit cyclist.  I close all my other rings too without even trying that hard.  The thing seems to be set for the average American middle aged overweight couch potato.  They'll have to think it through and redesign it for people who actually exercise regularly before I'll give it the time of day.   
    You absolutely can set the target level for your Move ring. 

    The exercise goal is 30 mins a day, if you exceed that by riding to work then that’s all there is to it...the rings aren’t meant as a tool for serious training. Most normals find it challenging just to meet the minimum suggested per day. The Workouts app is more suited, and a specialist third party app even more so. 

    Sounds like you’re very active and don’t need a stone-simple motivator tool. Good on you. Doesn’t mean it’s pointless. 
    edited July 2 lolliverfastasleepbeowulfschmidtGeorgeBMac
  • Reply 8 of 14
    StrangeDaysStrangeDays Posts: 8,778member

    I find the data reported to often be inaccurate. The AW4 tells me I have already stood for two hours within 15 minutes of putting the watch on for the first time in the day. Sometimes the exercise ring will count off exercise minutes when I am strolling leisurely through a store even though I didn’t officially start a workout. But if I get on a treadmill and really bring my heart rate up it only starts counting after I officially start a workout.
    Does not match my experience. Also, the exercise ring minutes are not dependent on you starting a workout in the Workouts app, FYI. If walking causes you to experience an elevated heart rate, that will count. 
    lolliver
  • Reply 9 of 14
    ihatescreennames said:
    It appears by your comment that you may not understand the Stand ring. Credit for 1 hour is earned by Standing (and moving) for 1 minute in that hour. If I put my Apple Watch on at 6:55 am and start my morning routine I will have earned 2 Stand hours by 7:05. That makes sense to me.
    Thanks for clearing that up for me.
    GeorgeBMac
  • Reply 10 of 14

    Does not match my experience. Also, the exercise ring minutes are not dependent on you starting a workout in the Workouts app, FYI. If walking causes you to experience an elevated heart rate, that will count.
    Maybe it requires the GPS to see you are moving before it ticks off exercise minutes and on a treadmill it explicitly requires you to tell it you are exercising because the GPS can’t tell?
    GeorgeBMac
  • Reply 11 of 14
    StrangeDaysStrangeDays Posts: 8,778member

    Does not match my experience. Also, the exercise ring minutes are not dependent on you starting a workout in the Workouts app, FYI. If walking causes you to experience an elevated heart rate, that will count.
    Maybe it requires the GPS to see you are moving before it ticks off exercise minutes and on a treadmill it explicitly requires you to tell it you are exercising because the GPS can’t tell?
    Not that I’m aware of, no. 
  • Reply 12 of 14
    matrix077matrix077 Posts: 781member
    I find the ring feature really dumb.  I am a cyclist and usually close my exercise ring before getting to work and finish the day between 400-999% of my daily goal.  That makes it useless and I can't change the target level to my level of activity or compare it to other fit cyclist.  I close all my other rings too without even trying that hard.  The thing seems to be set for the average American middle aged overweight couch potato.  They'll have to think it through and redesign it for people who actually exercise regularly before I'll give it the time of day.   

    I thought you could set the level?

    I find that most fitness programs have you reach goals just by living. It's annoying for those who don't drive. Sometimes I'll be sitting down in the middle of the day and get a "congratulations" or something and I'm like "I didn't even do anything today"
    You can’t set the Exercise ring, it’s always 30 minutes.

    That’s because that’s a minimum level required to be healthy. 30 minutes exercise each day. You do that and you’ll be fine. If one wants to push himself and be super-healthy, set the move ring (calories) to any value one wants. @midwestapplefan doesn’t seem to understand what all these rings are about. 
    edited July 3
  • Reply 13 of 14
    matrix077matrix077 Posts: 781member

    Does not match my experience. Also, the exercise ring minutes are not dependent on you starting a workout in the Workouts app, FYI. If walking causes you to experience an elevated heart rate, that will count.
    Maybe it requires the GPS to see you are moving before it ticks off exercise minutes and on a treadmill it explicitly requires you to tell it you are exercising because the GPS can’t tell?
    No, the threshold is your heart rate (when your hand moving of course). If your heart rate is up to a certain amount it will count as exercise (I believe the number varies from person to person). It doesn’t need you to tell it you are exercising even when you’re on treadmill. It will count as exercise anyway. You select Workout only because you want to record your workout data. If you don’t want that, feel free to go ahead and don’t tell the watch. Your exercise will be counted. 
    edited July 3
  • Reply 14 of 14
    GeorgeBMacGeorgeBMac Posts: 5,263member
    I find the ring feature really dumb.  I am a cyclist and usually close my exercise ring before getting to work and finish the day between 400-999% of my daily goal.  That makes it useless and I can't change the target level to my level of activity or compare it to other fit cyclist.  I close all my other rings too without even trying that hard.  The thing seems to be set for the average American middle aged overweight couch potato.  They'll have to think it through and redesign it for people who actually exercise regularly before I'll give it the time of day.   
    You absolutely can set the target level for your Move ring. 

    The exercise goal is 30 mins a day, if you exceed that by riding to work then that’s all there is to it...the rings aren’t meant as a tool for serious training. Most normals find it challenging just to meet the minimum suggested per day. The Workouts app is more suited, and a specialist third party app even more so. 

    Sounds like you’re very active and don’t need a stone-simple motivator tool. Good on you. Doesn’t mean it’s pointless. 
    Good point!
    The rings are meant for general, everyday tracking by everybody.
    For athletes Apple offers the Activity app on the Apple Watch and iPhone
    For serious athletes there are 3rd party apps that expand on the capabilities of the Activity app and Health apps.

    For myself, I use a 3rd party app to track my exercise but rely on the rings for my non-exercise day(s).   And, in any case, I look at them monthly to see if I closed them everyday.  If not, my feeling is, in the words of the guard in Shawshank Redemption:  "You'd better be either sick or dead" ...
    edited July 3
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