Apple Card is almost here, find out all you need to know

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in General Discussion
We've been waiting for months, and now there could be only weeks to go, maybe even days. Apple Card is nearly with us, and if it's right for you, it's going to change everything.

Apple Card is nearly here
Apple Card is nearly here


Since Apple Card was announced back on March 25, 2019, we have steadily learned more and more about it. Now almost the only thing left to discover is precisely when it's coming out. And if we can't know the date yet, we can know that it's soon.

This is chiefly because Apple said it was. Right from that opening launch, Apple was clear that we would have to wait until the summer. We may possibly not have waited very patiently, but we've waited, and it's summer.

Then Apple's retail staff in the US have been beta testing it for at least the last month.

And now, this week, Goldman Sachs began talking up its end of the credit card project, revealing that it has spent in the region of $275 million on creating and launching the card.

Plus Apple itself has begun filing for trademarks on the name "Apple Card" across Europe and Hong Kong. That does seem a little late in the day, but then Apple Card is exclusively launching in the US -- though we already knew it would later roll out to other countries.

Unless you're in one of those other countries, you can now expect Apple Card to arrive very soon. And there are many reasons to want one.




Applying

You'll have to have an iPhone. That's because applying is going to be done through the Wallet app. There are other requirements, to do with your finances.

Whether you get an Apple Card or not depends on your personal, financial situation, but the process of applying for it is going to be swift.

Apple is not going to reveal its algorithm for determining who does or does not qualify, but it's unlikely to be any different to other credit cards. In which case, you may already know whether you can expect to qualify.

If you do get it, though, you get it just about immediately.

Every detail of your spending will be right there in your Wallet app whenever you need it
Every detail of your spending will be right there in your Wallet app whenever you need it


From the moment your application is approved, you are the owner of an Apple Card -- just not yet an actual card. Wherever you pay online, you'll be able to use your Apple Card right away.

The physical card, that already famous titanium credit card, will arrive in the post after a few days. It'll look like every other credit card, and unlike any other, too. While the shape is the same and it'll have your name on it just like usual, it won't have any numbers on it at all.

We're presuming that once you qualify for an Apple Card, its details will be in your Wallet and you'll be able to pay at any contactless or NFC terminal too. What's certain is that once you have the physical card, you'll be able to use that wherever you can't currently use Apple Pay.

Security

One of the strong attractions of the Apple Card is this business of it having no number on it. This card is going to be the most secure credit card around, and that's for many reasons.

If someone steals your card, they don't know the number. If they manage to spend something on it, you'll know because your iPhone will tell you.

And you'll also be able to temporarily freeze or permanently delete the card if you need to. There's no keeping a list of bank phone numbers you have to ring, you cancel it right through your iPhone.

When you absolutely have to give someone your actual credit card number, you won't have to give them your actual one. Apple Card will generate a number you can give just to them and just for this transaction.

How it works in stores

If you've used Apple Pay, you already know how most of this goes. You can use your iPhone or your Apple Watch on the NFC terminal, or you can insert the physical Apple Card into a store's reader.

Apple has rather trained us to know how to do all of this, but what's new is what happens after we've paid.

First, every single transaction is monitored in detail -- for you, not for Apple. While Apple itself won't know what you've bought or where you got it, you will be able to see exact details.

Rather than seeing an unknown name on your statement at the end of the month, you see the name of the store right now on your phone. If you're looking back over a couple of days and can't recognize the name, your iPhone will show you the location on a map.

And you can also split purchases up into categories that you later track to see just what you're spending your money on.

Every day, every time you use the Card or any time when you need to know, all possible information is available to you immediately. You can't stop people being financially irresponsible, but you can do a lot and Apple has.




Every day

Speaking of every day and every purchase, Apple Card will pay you money each time you use it for anything.

There are many credit cards reward you, but often it's with points and always the aim is to get you to use the card more. Doubtlessly Apple wants the same result -- it's predicted to earn $1 billion per year from Apple Card -- but here it's coupled to that monitoring.

While you get a certain amount of money each time you use the card, that's part of having you be aware of your spending. Together with the ability to see just what you're spending, and then with how clear Apple is about the interest you'll end up owing, Apple Card presents an appealing package.

The rewards cash could be better, there are cards that offer more in certain circumstances. Whatever you buy on Apple Card, you get at least 1% of the purchase price back. That might be quite a rare figure to get, as it's the percentage when you're paying somewhere that does not yet accept Apple Pay and so is using this as a regular credit card.

If you buy anything through Apple Pay, via the Apple Card, then you'll get 2% back. And if you do that in an Apple Store or via any Apple-owned online store like iTunes, you get 3%.

Every day, you'll get the cashback from 24-hours of shopping delivered into your account. By default that's a separate Daily Cash account in your Wallet, but you can have it be paid into your actual Apple Card account.

So you can have this daily cash go toward paying off your credit card.

Paying off

The majority of credit cards present you with a bill at the end of the month, and while you can go online in the meantime, you tend not to. With Apple Card, the latest details are right there, on your iPhone, available to you immediately.

What's more, that detail includes how much interest you are probably going to have to pay at the end of the month.

While Apple doesn't charge an annual fee, and it doesn't charge you with late fees, it still works on a monthly cycle. And so you will owe the company money every month -- in theory.

A simple slider shows you how much you'll owe in interest, depending on when you choose to pay off the card
A simple slider shows you how much you'll owe in interest, depending on when you choose to pay off the card


In practice, you can pay off your card at any time, and if you do that regularly, you will be able to avoid high interest charges. The interest rate you pay is dependent on your financial situation when you apply, but in all cases the Wallet app will show you what you're going to owe.

It can only be an estimate, though. What it is really saying is that right now, if you spent nothing else and paid off nothing, at the end of the month, this is what you would owe.

Lost

You need to be responsible, though Apple Card is helping you more than most credit cards. If you are diligent about paying off the card, however, this is a really attractive offer.

As well as the business of it just being seamless to use, as well as it giving daily cash and letting us avoid high interest payments, it's also cutting out the banks as much as possible.

Apple is partnered with Goldman Sachs, but that firm is not going to stop your card on a whim.

We've had cases, for instance, where a bank has decided to refuse an Apple Pay transaction because we had used Apple Pay too often. We can't tell you how many is too many, because that bank does not publish the information and it refuses to tell us.

You know that won't happen with Apple. So alongside all the tangible benefits and features, Apple Card is going to disrupt old-style, consumer-unfriendly banking and we can't wait.



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Comments

  • Reply 1 of 63
    eightzeroeightzero Posts: 2,430member
    I'm curious to see how to set up payment to your card from the bank. I'm guessing we'll be able to simply point the camera at a blank check, and it will pick off the routing number and account number and confirm this for an ACH transfer. 

    I'm also curious what kind of "payment due" notifications will be provided. Yes, you can monitor, but if no statement arrives in the mail, I will want an alert, or even better, a way to set up an automatic payment. 

    "This Summer" means any time before September 23, 2019, given that Apple is based in the northern hemisphere. 
    lostkiwi
  • Reply 2 of 63
    gutengelgutengel Posts: 316member
    Do you know what credit bureau they'll be checking before approving and issuing the card? I got my credit scored freezed since the hack in Equifax years ago.
    jbdragonprairiewalker
  • Reply 3 of 63
    SoliSoli Posts: 9,178member
    eightzero said:
    I'm curious to see how to set up payment to your card from the bank. I'm guessing we'll be able to simply point the camera at a blank check, and it will pick off the routing number and account number and confirm this for an ACH transfer. 
    My assumption is that it will be like setting up Apple Cash. Perhaps you won't have to setup a bank if you already have at least one debit card set up for Apple Cash.

    I'm also curious what kind of "payment due" notifications will be provided. Yes, you can monitor, but if no statement arrives in the mail, I will want an alert, or even better, a way to set up an automatic payment. 
    I am as paperless as can be but still get email notifications. I assume there are also app notifications for my financial institutions and utilities, but I mostly keep them turned off with a repeating Calendar reminder set.

    "This Summer" means any time before September 23, 2019, given that Apple is based in the northern hemisphere.
    Even if they aren't ready for a full rollout I can see them making their launch date by shipping some cards to some customers so they can technically keep their promise. We've seen them do that many times over the years.

    watto_cobra
  • Reply 4 of 63
    I've got lots of credit cards that have apps on my iPhone, that I can lock, that I can make payments on my phone, see transactions,etc.

    I'm just not clear what is so special (except for a metal card) about this card?  In a nutshell, why would I want this card when I already have half a dozen other cards?
    flyingdpchemengin1jbdragon
  • Reply 5 of 63
    mrboba1mrboba1 Posts: 274member
    ITGUYINSD said:
    I've got lots of credit cards that have apps on my iPhone, that I can lock, that I can make payments on my phone, see transactions,etc.

    I'm just not clear what is so special (except for a metal card) about this card?  In a nutshell, why would I want this card when I already have half a dozen other cards?
    Did you read the article? It does things that other cards don't do, and some they do.
    edited July 17 steverobwatto_cobra
  • Reply 6 of 63
    SoliSoli Posts: 9,178member
    ITGUYINSD said:
    I've got lots of credit cards that have apps on my iPhone, that I can lock, that I can make payments on my phone, see transactions,etc.

    I'm just not clear what is so special (except for a metal card) about this card?  In a nutshell, why would I want this card when I already have half a dozen other cards?
    Why did you want card number 6 when you had 5 other cards?
    Why did you want card number 5 when you had 4 other cards?
    Why did you want card number 4 when you had 3 other cards?
    Why did you want card number 3 when you had 2 other cards?
    Why did you want card number 2 when you had 1 other card?

    Personally, it seems like a nifty collector's item, but more importantly it's about getting 2% back daily on Apple Pay purchases plus 3% back from the thousands of dollars I spend her year from Apple. Finally, a more tangental desire for this card (but will happen anyway) is getting more people to use Apple Pay (or really any other *Pay service) so we can finally get to a point where not carrying your physical card is commonplace because all merchants are aware fo the benefits and popularity of NFC-based *Pay systems.
    AppleExposedStrangeDayslostkiwiwatto_cobra
  • Reply 7 of 63
    felix01felix01 Posts: 248member
    ITGUYINSD said:
    I've got lots of credit cards that have apps on my iPhone, that I can lock, that I can make payments on my phone, see transactions,etc.

    I'm just not clear what is so special (except for a metal card) about this card?  In a nutshell, why would I want this card when I already have half a dozen other cards?
    Same question I have. I already have cards (in my Apple Wallet) which exceed the benefits of an Apple Card (except for the no visible number aspect) in every category I’ve seen publicly addressed thus far. So what’s the Apple Card draw?

    Getting another credit card will knock down my FICO score a few points for three months or so. 

    And how about when I have to generate a number for someone like Amazon which doesn’t accept ApplePay? Am I correct in assuming that number is only good for a single use? If so, that means I can’t use the card for a recurring bill without generating a new number for each use or for a monthly pay-off. For example, I can’t imagine generating a new number each month to pay for the newspaper. Now if that generated number is not for single use, these objections go away but then we are back to comparing the Apple Card to cards I already have which have better benefits.

    I don’t need an Apple Card just to be able to say I have one. So am I missing something here? That purchase tracking is kind of neat but frankly I’d rather have the better benefits offered by cards I already have.
    flyingdp
  • Reply 8 of 63
    SoliSoli Posts: 9,178member
    felix01 said:
    ITGUYINSD said:
    I've got lots of credit cards that have apps on my iPhone, that I can lock, that I can make payments on my phone, see transactions,etc.

    I'm just not clear what is so special (except for a metal card) about this card?  In a nutshell, why would I want this card when I already have half a dozen other cards?
    Same question I have. I already have cards (in my Apple Wallet) which exceed the benefits of an Apple Card (except for the no visible number aspect) in every category I’ve seen publicly addressed thus far. So what’s the Apple Card draw?

    Getting another credit card will knock down my FICO score a few points for three months or so. 

    And how about when I have to generate a number for someone like Amazon which doesn’t accept ApplePay? Am I correct in assuming that number is only good for a single use? If so, that means I can’t use the card for a recurring bill without generating a new number for each use or for a monthly pay-off. For example, I can’t imagine generating a new number each month to pay for the newspaper. Now if that generated number is not for single use, these objections go away but then we are back to comparing the Apple Card to cards I already have which have better benefits.

    I don’t need an Apple Card just to be able to say I have one. So am I missing something here? That purchase tracking is kind of neat but frankly I’d rather have the better benefits offered by cards I already have.
    What free cards do you have that exceeds the benefits of the Apple Card's 2% back daily as a minimum for all Apple Pay-based purchases?

    Getting another credit card will knock down my FICO score a few points for three months or so. 

    More revolving credit can also help your credit score because you are now shown to have more access to credit and your current spending habits will help keep you under credit utilization down as this is deternimated as a percentage of available credit, not a dollar value.


    I don’t need an Apple Card just to be able to say I have one. So am I missing something here? That purchase tracking is kind of neat but frankly I’d rather have the better benefits offered by cards I already have.

    It's not any different than deciding on whether an iPhone, Mac mini, Mac Pro or any other product is a good fit for your needs. If you don't see a need to have one because you have free cards that give you more than 2% back as a minimum (which is something I have yet to see) and more than 3% back for Apple's various store then there is little reason for you to get this card.

    edited July 17 AppleExposedrandominternetpersonmacguiwatto_cobra
  • Reply 9 of 63
    eightzeroeightzero Posts: 2,430member
    Soli said:
    eightzero said:
    I'm curious to see how to set up payment to your card from the bank. I'm guessing we'll be able to simply point the camera at a blank check, and it will pick off the routing number and account number and confirm this for an ACH transfer. 
    My assumption is that it will be like setting up Apple Cash. Perhaps you won't have to setup a bank if you already have at least one debit card set up for Apple Cash.
    Possible. I don't have a debit card, and don't want one. Why would I give up the cash back rewards that are always available on credit cards? And one more card that can get compromised. 
  • Reply 10 of 63
    Soli said:
    ITGUYINSD said:
    I've got lots of credit cards that have apps on my iPhone, that I can lock, that I can make payments on my phone, see transactions,etc.

    I'm just not clear what is so special (except for a metal card) about this card?  In a nutshell, why would I want this card when I already have half a dozen other cards?
    Finally, a more tangental desire for this card (but will happen anyway) is getting more people to use Apple Pay (or really any other *Pay service) so we can finally get to a point where not carrying your physical card is commonplace because all merchants are aware fo the benefits and popularity of NFC-based *Pay systems.
    I might be missing something, but you don’t need this card to use Apple Pay. I have all my credit cards wired into Apple Pay already.
  • Reply 11 of 63
    rob53rob53 Posts: 2,074member
    Does Apple Pay look credit card agnostic to the POS station or does it check to see what type of credit card it's using? I have my Citibank Visa from Costco as my Apple Pay credit card and Costco only takes Visa (all Visas now). It's my understanding that the Apple Card is a MasterCard. Is that correct? Will using Apple Pay at Costco see it as a MasterCard or just an accepted payment card?

    I'm still getting one and will get rid of my extra cards I've kept to keep my credit card history higher.
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 12 of 63
    AppleExposedAppleExposed Posts: 1,376unconfirmed, member
    This is gonna be revolutionary I just feel it.

    ITGUYINSD said:
    I've got lots of credit cards that have apps on my iPhone, that I can lock, that I can make payments on my phone, see transactions,etc.

    I'm just not clear what is so special (except for a metal card) about this card?  In a nutshell, why would I want this card when I already have half a dozen other cards?

    Hey 1-poster. Maybe just Maybe it's from Apple, will make life easier and integrate with Apple.

    Soli said:
    felix01 said:
    ITGUYINSD said:
    I've got lots of credit cards that have apps on my iPhone, that I can lock, that I can make payments on my phone, see transactions,etc.

    I'm just not clear what is so special (except for a metal card) about this card?  In a nutshell, why would I want this card when I already have half a dozen other cards?
    Same question I have. I already have cards (in my Apple Wallet) which exceed the benefits of an Apple Card (except for the no visible number aspect) in every category I’ve seen publicly addressed thus far. So what’s the Apple Card draw?

    Getting another credit card will knock down my FICO score a few points for three months or so. 

    And how about when I have to generate a number for someone like Amazon which doesn’t accept ApplePay? Am I correct in assuming that number is only good for a single use? If so, that means I can’t use the card for a recurring bill without generating a new number for each use or for a monthly pay-off. For example, I can’t imagine generating a new number each month to pay for the newspaper. Now if that generated number is not for single use, these objections go away but then we are back to comparing the Apple Card to cards I already have which have better benefits.

    I don’t need an Apple Card just to be able to say I have one. So am I missing something here? That purchase tracking is kind of neat but frankly I’d rather have the better benefits offered by cards I already have.
    What free cards do you have that exceeds the benefits of the Apple Card's 2% back daily as a minimum for all Apple Pay-based purchases?

    Getting another credit card will knock down my FICO score a few points for three months or so. 

    More revolving credit can also help your credit score because you are now shown to have more access to credit and your current spending habits will help keep you under credit utilization down as this is deternimated as a percentage of available credit, not a dollar value.


    I don’t need an Apple Card just to be able to say I have one. So am I missing something here? That purchase tracking is kind of neat but frankly I’d rather have the better benefits offered by cards I already have.

    It's not any different than deciding on whether an iPhone, Mac mini, Mac Pro or any other product is a good fit for your needs. If you don't see a need to have one because you have free cards that give you more than 2% back as a minimum (which is something I have yet to see) and more than 3% back for Apple's various store then there is little reason for you to get this card.


    There's no reason knocking sense into these guys. Every time Apple announces a revolutionary product we get the pessimists.

    Reminds me of the people who didn't need an iPhone because they already had an iPod and a samsung flip phone.
    Solirandominternetpersonsteverob
  • Reply 13 of 63
    felix01felix01 Posts: 248member
    @Soli

    Well, I’m not going to list my cards on an open forum but this will get you started:

    https://www.creditcards.com/cash-back/

    https://www.nerdwallet.com/best/credit-cards/cash-back
  • Reply 14 of 63
    SoliSoli Posts: 9,178member
    felix01 said:
    @Soli

    Well, I’m not going to list my cards on an open forum but this will get you started:

    https://www.creditcards.com/cash-back/

    https://www.nerdwallet.com/best/credit-cards/cash-back
    What cards are you referring? The one that has a massive annual fee, the ones that have it on select purchases, or the one has it as short-term introductory offer? Because those are not the same as better than 2% for all Apple Pay purchases at a minimum for a free card.
    edited July 17 StrangeDaysRayz2016randominternetpersonlostkiwiwatto_cobra
  • Reply 15 of 63
    gutengelgutengel Posts: 316member
    felix01 said:
    ITGUYINSD said:
    I've got lots of credit cards that have apps on my iPhone, that I can lock, that I can make payments on my phone, see transactions,etc.

    I'm just not clear what is so special (except for a metal card) about this card?  In a nutshell, why would I want this card when I already have half a dozen other cards?
    Same question I have. I already have cards (in my Apple Wallet) which exceed the benefits of an Apple Card (except for the no visible number aspect) in every category I’ve seen publicly addressed thus far. So what’s the Apple Card draw?

    Getting another credit card will knock down my FICO score a few points for three months or so. 

    And how about when I have to generate a number for someone like Amazon which doesn’t accept ApplePay? Am I correct in assuming that number is only good for a single use? If so, that means I can’t use the card for a recurring bill without generating a new number for each use or for a monthly pay-off. For example, I can’t imagine generating a new number each month to pay for the newspaper. Now if that generated number is not for single use, these objections go away but then we are back to comparing the Apple Card to cards I already have which have better benefits.

    I don’t need an Apple Card just to be able to say I have one. So am I missing something here? That purchase tracking is kind of neat but frankly I’d rather have the better benefits offered by cards I already have.
    Yeah man, you're probably gonna have to copy and paste the "new credit card number" every month for each one of your subscriptions. That's exactly how apple envision their customers using their services, annoyingly copying and pasting a new CC# every month, for every service for their rest of their life. It's all Tim Cooks' fault and that's why apply is doomed. If you think the benefits are stupid, the titanium is dumb and you have 20 other CC's, guess what? you don't have to get Apple's card. If you feel pressured by your friends and social circle to get Apple Card "just to be able to say I have one" maybe get new friends?
    StrangeDaysrandominternetperson
  • Reply 16 of 63
    SoliSoli Posts: 9,178member
    rob53 said:
    Does Apple Pay look credit card agnostic to the POS station or does it check to see what type of credit card it's using? I have my Citibank Visa from Costco as my Apple Pay credit card and Costco only takes Visa (all Visas now). It's my understanding that the Apple Card is a MasterCard. Is that correct? Will using Apple Pay at Costco see it as a MasterCard or just an accepted payment card?

    I'm still getting one and will get rid of my extra cards I've kept to keep my credit card history higher.
    Yeah, you won't be able to use it at Costco because it's not a VISA, but I wouldn't want to use it anyway (at least not at the pump) since I get 4% back on fuel.
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 17 of 63
    SoliSoli Posts: 9,178member
    eightzero said:
    Soli said:
    eightzero said:
    I'm curious to see how to set up payment to your card from the bank. I'm guessing we'll be able to simply point the camera at a blank check, and it will pick off the routing number and account number and confirm this for an ACH transfer. 
    My assumption is that it will be like setting up Apple Cash. Perhaps you won't have to setup a bank if you already have at least one debit card set up for Apple Cash.
    Why would I give up the cash back rewards that are always available on credit cards? And one more card that can get compromised. 
    Why do you have the cards you have? Do you not use different cards to get different benefits from different types of purchases?

    Since Apple Pay helps ensure that your card will not be compromised like your physical cards getting more people to use Apple Pay and as a result getting more merchants to advertise their acceptance of it is a good move.
    edited July 17 StrangeDayswatto_cobra
  • Reply 18 of 63
    StrangeDaysStrangeDays Posts: 8,244member
    Let’s sum up the comments so far:

    ”I haven’t read the articles that explain what’s nifty about this card.”

    “But I already have a credit card!”

    🤦🏻‍♂️
    AppleExposedrandominternetpersonsteverobbeowulfschmidtneilmbshankwatto_cobra
  • Reply 19 of 63
    mpantonempantone Posts: 1,420member
    Short answer: There is no one best card for everyone.

    Detailed explanation: Different cards have different benefits (and restrictions) in different situations. Whether one card is better than another depends on the individual and their purchasing habits.

    I never carry a balance so interest rates are irrelevant for me. None of my cards have an annual fee.
    • Card A: Extended warranty protection. New purchase protection. Average rewards program. Superior merchant dispute team. Superior customer service. Very good credit limit. Neither Visa nor MasterCard, not accepted everywhere. 
    • Card B: Big credit limit. Lousy customer service. 3% rewards at restaurants (regardless of whether it's swipe, chip or Apple Pay).
    • Card F: Decent rewards program. Automatic reward deposit to brokerage account every month.
    • Card J: 5% rewards for select categories each quarter (Q3 at gas stations, regardless of transaction type).
    • Card K: Mediocre rewards program that only gives gift cards. No foreign transaction fees. I usually redeem iTunes Store Gift Cards with my accumulated points.
    • Card V: Smallest credit limit, average rewards program. No foreign transaction fees.
    Depending on the situation, it is advantageous using a certain card.

    I don't shop at big box stores. I don't eat at chain restaurants or fast food places. I patronize a lot of mom-and-pop stores. Almost all of my produce is purchased at the city's farmers market (mostly cash transactions). I am not a small business owner.

    I do a fair amount of international travel (for personal holiday, not for work) so the foreign transaction fees are noteworthy. 

    For big ticket items including travel (airline tickets, domestic travel arrangements), I use Card A. If I drop my brand new iPhone in the parking lot of the Apple Store and the screen shatters, Card A will cover the replacement. Getting an extra year of warranty coverage is great for it and similar purchases.

    For dining out, I use Card B. No brainer.

    For buying gas this quarter, I use Card J.

    From a "responsible personal finance" standpoint, using Card F is probably the best since it deposits the reward rebate back into my brokerage account where I am more apt to invest it. However, I'm disciplined enough to fully fund my Roth IRA every year, so that's not really a selling point for using Card F. It might be helpful for others though.

    For international travel, I use Card K and Card V. This includes recurring/occasional transactions that use an overseas credit card processing company. 

    Where does Apple Card fit for me? To me, its main benefits are A.) no foreign transaction fees, and B.) 2% rewards on Apple Pay transactions. Whether or not the Apple Card provides extended warranty protection and recent purchase protection is unclear at this time. What's better, using an Apple Card on a $2,000 Apple Store purchase and getting $60 cash back or using Card A and getting an extra year of warranty protection, recent purchase protection and $20 back?

    While I have not seen the full cardmember benefits document, it appears that using the Apple Pay card for me makes the most sense for A.) foreign transactions, and B.) if I can use Apple Pay at a POS terminal unless we are talking about a big ticket item that may benefit from extended warranty protection and recent purchase protection.

    A real unknown is Goldman Sachs customer service. Historically they have not been a consumer company. Will them provide the same level of customer service as Card A's issuer?

    But that's just me. Each person has their own financial situation and own spending habits. If you do most of your shopping at big box stores, mostly eat at large chains, and never leave the USA, well, Apple Card might be something you use more often than me.
    edited July 17 randominternetpersonStrangeDays
  • Reply 20 of 63
    @Soli ;

    First of all, the Fidelity 2% cashback card, Citi double cash card, and Paypal cashback card are all free cards that offer 2% cashback on ALL purchases. So yes, these all exceed the 2% offered by Apple on Apple Pay purchases only. Not to mention the various sign on bonuses, price protections, and extended warranty coverages these cards offer that Apple has yet to (if at all) announce for the Apple card. 

    Seconf of all, regarding your "thousands of dollars" you spend each year directly from Apple, well, you're just a fool for spending full price when you can easily find the products (even new ones) for a discount much greater than the extra 1% you get with the Apple card. For example, Amazon is selling the new iPad Air for $469 while selling for $499 at the Apple Store. Many people have the Amazon Store card or Amazon Prime card, both giving 5% discount on ALL Amazon purchases. So in the Amazon example, 6% discount on base price plus 5% Amazon card discount is 11% total discount from purchasing from Amazon vs Apple Store. How does your 3% sound now?

    You have fervently defended this Apple Card and decried anyone else with valid facts as to why the Apple card is not the best card as trolls which is clearly untrue.
    1STnTENDERBITS
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