Hackintosh vs Mac Pro, 2019 iPhone dummy models, and more on the AppleInsider Podcast

Posted:
in General Discussion edited July 19
This week on the AppleInsider Podcast, William and Victor talk about 2019 dummy iPhones, how cases get made, what's up with the slower SSD in 2019 MacBook Air, and whether you can make a Hackintosh that's faster than a Mac Pro.

mac pro
The Mac Pro


AppleInsider editor Victor Marks and writer William Gallagher discuss:
  • Betas! iOS 12.6 beta 7 is out - and it's especially noteworthy because it shows Apple's level of commitment to quality for the final release of iOS 12.

  • Do you need a new iPhone? And, how do you know?

  • Marques Brownlee has dummy models of the 2019 iPhones. We talk a bit about how case manufacturers get information and what exactly this can tell about Apple's plans.

  • 2019 MacBook Air: it's impressive, but also has a somewhat slower SSD drive. We talk about who will even notice the difference.

  • Jack Dorsey spoke at Apple to Apple Marketing and while no one is saying what he told them, we have a few wild ideas.

  • The Department of Justice asks the judge in the Qualcomm antitrust case to temporarily hold on enforcing the judgement.

  • Apple is going to start funding podcast production, to compete with Spotify.

  • Can you build a Hackintosh that's faster than a new Mac Pro? And, if you really can, should you?
We like reader email -- send us your comments and concerns!.

The show is available on iTunes and your favorite podcast apps by searching for "AppleInsider." Click here to listen, subscribe, and don't forget to rate our show.


Listen to the embedded SoundCloud feed below:

Follow our hosts on Twitter: @WGallagher and @vmarks.

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Comments

  • Reply 1 of 3
    MacProMacPro Posts: 18,352member
    The whole Hackintosh thing is a fun area to explore now it is so easy.  Heck, I want to try it on my gaming PC using a dual boot just for the heck of it to see what the GTX 1080s do under macOS ( ... Nothing maybe? Are there any drivers?).  I'm retired so it's all just entertainment now.

    However, there's the elephant in the room no one mentions in the 'how-to build a Hackintosh' YouTube tutorials, the 'T2'.  

    We know without a T2 chip no Hackintosh has the security side of things a Mac with it has but I have read it is also involved in the codec side if things for the latest video of image compression systems.  That's huge until someone finds away to get around that.  In tests, HEVC export times are abysmal compared to a Mac with one then there are HEIF images in Photos et alia. I also suspect Apple can do a lot more with that T2.  How long before any motherboard without a T2 ( ... T3 etc.) will find macOS simply won't run thus blocking Hackintoshes access to newer versions of the OS?  If I were Craig I'd have done that already! We used to call it a 'dongle'.
    cgWerks
  • Reply 2 of 3
    vmarksvmarks Posts: 720editor
    MacPro said:
    The whole Hackintosh thing is a fun area to explore now it is so easy.  Heck, I want to try it on my gaming PC using a dual boot just for the heck of it to see what the GTX 1080s do under macOS ( ... Nothing maybe? Are there any drivers?).  I'm retired so it's all just entertainment now.

    However, there's the elephant in the room no one mentions in the 'how-to build a Hackintosh' YouTube tutorials, the 'T2'.  

    We know without a T2 chip no Hackintosh has the security side of things a Mac with it has but I have read it is also involved in the codec side if things for the latest video of image compression systems.  That's huge until someone finds away to get around that.  In tests, HEVC export times are abysmal compared to a Mac with one then there are HEIF images in Photos et alia. I also suspect Apple can do a lot more with that T2.  How long before any motherboard without a T2 ( ... T3 etc.) will find macOS simply won't run thus blocking Hackintoshes access to newer versions of the OS?  If I were Craig I'd have done that already! We used to call it a 'dongle'.
    True, but there are plenty of Macs that don't have a T2 and are still supported: In my house, there's a 2014 MacBook Air 11", a 2015 MacBook Air 13", and a 2014 MacBook Pro. If you want to block access to Hackintosh, you're going to end up blocking access to these Macs that still work, and the lost profits due to Hackintosh are probably very small. If it were widespread the way Windows license violations are, it would be a larger problem that would need to be addressed.

    I suggest that your solution to have done it already would be heavy-handed for users with 3 year old hardware. It just isn't necessary.

  • Reply 3 of 3
    Mike WuertheleMike Wuerthele Posts: 4,756administrator
    vmarks said:
    MacPro said:
    The whole Hackintosh thing is a fun area to explore now it is so easy.  Heck, I want to try it on my gaming PC using a dual boot just for the heck of it to see what the GTX 1080s do under macOS ( ... Nothing maybe? Are there any drivers?).  I'm retired so it's all just entertainment now.

    However, there's the elephant in the room no one mentions in the 'how-to build a Hackintosh' YouTube tutorials, the 'T2'.  

    We know without a T2 chip no Hackintosh has the security side of things a Mac with it has but I have read it is also involved in the codec side if things for the latest video of image compression systems.  That's huge until someone finds away to get around that.  In tests, HEVC export times are abysmal compared to a Mac with one then there are HEIF images in Photos et alia. I also suspect Apple can do a lot more with that T2.  How long before any motherboard without a T2 ( ... T3 etc.) will find macOS simply won't run thus blocking Hackintoshes access to newer versions of the OS?  If I were Craig I'd have done that already! We used to call it a 'dongle'.
    True, but there are plenty of Macs that don't have a T2 and are still supported: In my house, there's a 2014 MacBook Air 11", a 2015 MacBook Air 13", and a 2014 MacBook Pro. If you want to block access to Hackintosh, you're going to end up blocking access to these Macs that still work, and the lost profits due to Hackintosh are probably very small. If it were widespread the way Windows license violations are, it would be a larger problem that would need to be addressed.

    I suggest that your solution to have done it already would be heavy-handed for users with 3 year old hardware. It just isn't necessary.

    The latest iMacs don't have the T2 either, so it will be at least five years, I suspect.
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