General consumer interest in Apple Card is 'remarkably high,' says survey

Posted:
in General Discussion
The benchmarking and survey company J.D. Power is predicting that Apple Card will be hit, based on the awareness and interest of US consumers ahead of its launch.

Apple Card


J.D. Power, the company best known for its annual report on consumer satisfaction toward technology products, has conducted a survey into how consumers are reacting to Apple Card. Conducted before the card was available to even a few users, the survey reports that "Apple Card [is] poised to be a hit, despite lagging the industry leaders on rewards."

Of the US consumers surveyed, 38% were aware that Apple Card was coming. Of those who knew about it, 35% told J.D. Power that they were somewhat or very likely to apply for it.






The figures are higher for younger respondents, with 52% of 18-29-year-olds saying they were aware of Apple Card. Separately, 52% of people currently using Apple Pay said that they were likely to apply for Apple Card in the next 12 months.

Those Apple Pay users represented just 11% of all the adults surveyed, though it rises to 20% of all those who use an iPhone.

Nonetheless, J.D. Power notes that this 'remarkably high' awareness and interest comes when, at the time of the survey, Apple Card had not been heavily marketed.

It also notes that this interest comes despite Apple Card falling short compared to other cards which offer, for instance, sign-up bonuses. Since the survey was conducted in July 2019, Apple has begun promoting Apple Card with a series of videos on how to apply and use it.

The card is now available for a very small number of people but will be rolling out to US customers this month. It's also going to expand overseas, but no details have been revealed yet.
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Comments

  • Reply 1 of 53
    Many of Apple's products stay inside the home or are invisible (computers, services). But the Apple Card is typically carried outside the home and thus can be a carryable status symbol. If I can get one, here in Canada, it will certainly be the front card in my wallet.
    lostkiwi
  • Reply 2 of 53
    MplsPMplsP Posts: 1,547member
    The real question is not how many said they would apply for it, it’s how many people actually do apply for it. The number of people expressing intent is always significantly higher than those that follow through, but I assume JD Power has past comparisons. Then again, maybe not. The Apple Card is rather unique in many ways, and I can’t really think of a recent comparison. Banks come out with new cards all the time with some tweak or another and we’re all pretty numb to them by now. In addition to the standard bank cards, pretty much every ’traditional’ company has a credit card - GM, Macys, Delta, etc. The Apple Card looks different, comes from a different and high-profile company and does have some different features.

    It will be interesting to see what the true interest turns out to be in a year or so. Hopefully it goes well.
    edited August 7 chemengin1
  • Reply 3 of 53
    GeorgeBMacGeorgeBMac Posts: 4,946member

    ...
    The figures are higher for younger respondents, with 52% of 18-29-year-olds saying they were aware of Apple Card. Separately, 52% of people currently using Apple Pay said that they were likely to apply for Apple Card in the next 12 months.

    Those Apple Pay users represented just 11% of all the adults surveyed, though it rises to 20% of all those who use an iPhone.

    ...
    That makes sense to me.   A lot of the features of the card will benefit younger people who may be less established and less stabilized than a mature, experienced user by helping them to understand their spending better and managing their money better.

    Frankly, for myself, relying strictly on those features of the card would be a step down for me from what I am currently doing with Quicken.
  • Reply 4 of 53
    spice-boyspice-boy Posts: 882member
    "will BE a hit"
  • Reply 5 of 53
    spice-boyspice-boy Posts: 882member
    Apple Card is really a non-card. If you want to take advantage of the one feature that anyone really cares about (cash back) then you will use Apple Pay to achieve that goal. The shiny (or matte finish) titanium card is the window dressing for your physical wallet, Apple Pay just got a lot better.
    chemengin1lostkiwi
  • Reply 6 of 53
    mobirdmobird Posts: 220member
    Definitely going to be a "status symbol" for a number of people. Some of these applicants with the "status symbol" in mind probably do not care about rewards %, interest %, or the "fine" print regarding TOS that they will never read and then there will be some who won't even attempt to utilize all the new features in the Wallet app. Some manufacturer of "physical" wallets will probably even introduce a new form of wallet for the vain that ensures that the Card can be displayed and observed...
    edited August 7
  • Reply 7 of 53
    larryjwlarryjw Posts: 394member
    I import and maintain financial information in Quicken, but have done so with other software for decades. Some of the promised features of Apple Card simply has limited value to me.

    For younger folk who’ve yet to learn how to manage their finances, some of these features would be better than nothing. 

    I’ll get the Apple Card as soon as I’m able, just for the experience, if nothing else. But I will have no problem canceling the card if it fails to meet certain standards. First, all transactions must be importable into Quicken. Second, transaction alerts must be available. Third, fraudulent transaction security must be present. There are likely other requirements, but these three are on my short list. 
    GeorgeBMacweyland_jon
  • Reply 8 of 53
    GeorgeBMacGeorgeBMac Posts: 4,946member
    spice-boy said:
    Apple Card is really a non-card. If you want to take advantage of the one feature that anyone really cares about (cash back) then you will use Apple Pay to achieve that goal. The shiny (or matte finish) titanium card is the window dressing for your physical wallet, Apple Pay just got a lot better.
    There is little chance that that titanium marvel will ever see anything but the inside of my desk drawer.
    For the few times that I do not use Apple Pay I will use one of my other cards that pay more than 1%.
    bonobobrogifan_newrandominternetperson
  • Reply 9 of 53
    GeorgeBMacGeorgeBMac Posts: 4,946member
    larryjw said:
    I import and maintain financial information in Quicken, but have done so with other software for decades. Some of the promised features of Apple Card simply has limited value to me.

    For younger folk who’ve yet to learn how to manage their finances, some of these features would be better than nothing. 

    I’ll get the Apple Card as soon as I’m able, just for the experience, if nothing else. But I will have no problem canceling the card if it fails to meet certain standards. First, all transactions must be importable into Quicken. Second, transaction alerts must be available. Third, fraudulent transaction security must be present. There are likely other requirements, but these three are on my short list. 
    I agree with all of that -- but especially the part about being importable into Quicken.   WIthout that, it is a non-starter for me,  The basic requirement is notifications on every transaction -- but I understand that it does do that.
    weyland_jon
  • Reply 10 of 53
    spice-boyspice-boy Posts: 882member
    spice-boy said:
    Apple Card is really a non-card. If you want to take advantage of the one feature that anyone really cares about (cash back) then you will use Apple Pay to achieve that goal. The shiny (or matte finish) titanium card is the window dressing for your physical wallet, Apple Pay just got a lot better.
    There is little chance that that titanium marvel will ever see anything but the inside of my desk drawer.
    For the few times that I do not use Apple Pay I will use one of my other cards that pay more than 1%.
    I think we said the same thing.
  • Reply 11 of 53
    MikeEMikeE Posts: 1unconfirmed, member
    I’ll be getting one as soon as it’s available, and while the 2% cash back for Apple Pay transactions is attractive, I’m most interested in the card for the security features. Having no number printed on the card makes me a lot more comfortable handing the card over to a restaurant server who heads off to the back to run the payment, and I’ll happily trade a slightly less attractive cash back rate for the one-time dynamic security code generated on the iPhone to authorize a purchase. 


    randominternetpersonRayz2016weyland_jonlostkiwi
  • Reply 12 of 53
    mazda 3smazda 3s Posts: 1,576member
    Seems like a mediocre card with regards to benefits (IMHO). I've got an Uber VISA that gives me:

    1% on all purchases
    2% on all online purchase (including Apple)
    3% on travel/hotels
    4% on restaurants

    I don't really care about the "prestige" factor; I care about what I'm getting out of it.
    chemengin1Carnagephilboogie
  • Reply 13 of 53
    GeorgeBMacGeorgeBMac Posts: 4,946member
    spice-boy said:
    spice-boy said:
    Apple Card is really a non-card. If you want to take advantage of the one feature that anyone really cares about (cash back) then you will use Apple Pay to achieve that goal. The shiny (or matte finish) titanium card is the window dressing for your physical wallet, Apple Pay just got a lot better.
    There is little chance that that titanium marvel will ever see anything but the inside of my desk drawer.
    For the few times that I do not use Apple Pay I will use one of my other cards that pay more than 1%.
    I think we said the same thing.
    Pretty much
  • Reply 14 of 53
    LordhanLordhan Posts: 10member
    larryjw said:
    I import and maintain financial information in Quicken, but have done so with other software for decades. Some of the promised features of Apple Card simply has limited value to me.

    For younger folk who’ve yet to learn how to manage their finances, some of these features would be better than nothing. 

    I’ll get the Apple Card as soon as I’m able, just for the experience, if nothing else. But I will have no problem canceling the card if it fails to meet certain standards. First, all transactions must be importable into Quicken. Second, transaction alerts must be available. Third, fraudulent transaction security must be present. There are likely other requirements, but these three are on my short list. 

  • Reply 15 of 53
    LordhanLordhan Posts: 10member
    But that Quicken is not free.. you need to pay a huge amount of money 
    Apple Card service is free. 
  • Reply 16 of 53
    eightzeroeightzero Posts: 2,430member
    spice-boy said:
    Apple Card is really a non-card. If you want to take advantage of the one feature that anyone really cares about (cash back) then you will use Apple Pay to achieve that goal. The shiny (or matte finish) titanium card is the window dressing for your physical wallet, Apple Pay just got a lot better.
    There is little chance that that titanium marvel will ever see anything but the inside of my desk drawer.
    For the few times that I do not use Apple Pay I will use one of my other cards that pay more than 1%.
    Me too. 
    GeorgeBMac
  • Reply 17 of 53
    rogifan_newrogifan_new Posts: 4,147member
    Rene Ritchie re-tweeted someone who predicted nearly 70% of iPhone users would sign up for this card.  I doubt 70% of iPhone users even know what the wallet app is. The hype around this is a bit much.
    chemengin1
  • Reply 18 of 53
    rogifan_newrogifan_new Posts: 4,147member
    Many of Apple's products stay inside the home or are invisible (computers, services). But the Apple Card is typically carried outside the home and thus can be a carryable status symbol. If I can get one, here in Canada, it will certainly be the front card in my wallet.
    An Apple credit card is a status symbol to you?
    chemengin1GeorgeBMacmazda 3sCarnagephilboogie
  • Reply 19 of 53
    SoliSoli Posts: 9,178member
    This will be the most popular specific credit card ever released. This will also be only credit card that will actively replace another credit card for people; namely the Barclay Apple card.
  • Reply 20 of 53
    rogifan_newrogifan_new Posts: 4,147member

    spice-boy said:
    Apple Card is really a non-card. If you want to take advantage of the one feature that anyone really cares about (cash back) then you will use Apple Pay to achieve that goal. The shiny (or matte finish) titanium card is the window dressing for your physical wallet, Apple Pay just got a lot better.
    There is little chance that that titanium marvel will ever see anything but the inside of my desk drawer.
    For the few times that I do not use Apple Pay I will use one of my other cards that pay more than 1%.
    The card I currently have is 1.5% cash back. I might sign up for the Apple Card just to use it for Apple Pay and App Store/iTunes transactions. I wish the iPhone upgrade program monthly payments qualified for the 3% cash back though.
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