Samsung's ARM-based Galaxy Book S lasts 23 hours, features touchscreen and LTE connectivit...

Posted:
in General Discussion edited August 7
Samsung at its Unpacked event on Wednesday unveiled the Galaxy Book S, an addition to the company's Galaxy Book line that features an ARM-based Qualcomm Snapdragon processor for longer battery life.

Samsung Galaxy Book S


Announced alongside Samsung's latest flagship phablets, the Galaxy Note 10 and 10+, the portable runs Windows 10 and packs a 13.3-inch display with support for ten points of multitouch input, cellular connectivity, 8GB of RAM, up to 512GB of internal storage and other standard features into a chassis weighing in at just over two pounds.

Like 2018's Galaxy Book2, Samsung opted to power Galaxy Book S with an efficient ARM-based chip. Designed for desktop applications, Qualcomm's Snapdragon 8cx is a 7-nanometer, 64-bit, eight-core chip that boasts a clock speed of 2.84GHz. As noted by The Verge, Samsung is promising 40 percent greater CPU performance and 80 percent greater graphics performance than the Snapdragon 850 mobile platform in the Galaxy Book2.

Whether the diminutive thin-and-light can deliver those numbers has yet to be seen, though past efforts to incorporate an ARM chip into a daily duty Windows laptop have been largely unsuccessful. Intel's silicon, sometimes knocked for a lack of power efficiency, are for the most part more adept at running a full-fledged operating system.

That said, ARM enables extraordinarily long run times, with Samsung claiming the 42Wh battery in Galaxy Book S can go up to 23 hours between charges. The measurement is based on playback of a locally stored video without connection to either Wi-Fi or mobile network, meaning real-world use will likely see a significant decrease in actual uptime.

Samsung also touts instant-on capabilities that immediately wake the computer with a touch of the power button, fingerprint sensor, keyboard or mousepad.

Galaxy Book S debuts in September starting at $999.

Apple, too, is rumored to move its MacBook laptop line away from Intel in favor of custom A-series ARM chips as soon as 2020. The transition is expected to take years, with low-power, entry-level Macs likely gaining access before more powerful machines like the MacBook Pro.
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Comments

  • Reply 1 of 22
    seanismorrisseanismorris Posts: 1,015member
    The Samsung Galaxy Book 2 was carried (sold) through Verizon at 41.66/month for 24 months.  The Galaxy Book S will probably be similar...

    Will the MacBook Pro or Air ever get LTE?  Maybe a 12” MacBook (A Series) LTE in 2020?

    AI should kick the tires on the Samsung Book S as a college machine.  Colleges seem to prefer Windows for engineering majors, and Macs for Arts...  Will a Windows on ARM even run the software? Or, is this a hobbled Windows machine that will run little more than Microsoft Office?
  • Reply 2 of 22
    sirozhasirozha Posts: 573member
    Can’t innovate my ass. 
    anantksundaramFileMakerFeller
  • Reply 3 of 22
    Small quibble with the article's title.  I think there should be an asterisk associated with that 23 hr battery claim.  I really think the 23 hr claim shouldn't even be mentioned in the title, but that's just me. It's a bit of theater by Samsung to promote battery life by looping a locally stored video.  As stated in the article, no wifi or celluar use.  Not really a basis to honestly claim 23 hrs.

    Otherwise, I'm excited to see what improvements have been made for x86 on ARM.  If this thing garners good reviews and turns out to be viable, I might just pick one up around May 2020 when they will have likely depreciated by 40-50%
    gilly33chasmFileMakerFeller
  • Reply 4 of 22
    sirozhasirozha Posts: 573member
    Small quibble with the article's title.  I think there should be an asterisk associated with that 23 hr battery claim.  I really think the 23 hr claim shouldn't even be mentioned in the title, but that's just me. It's a bit of theater by Samsung to promote battery life by looping a locally stored video.  As stated in the article, no wifi or celluar use.  Not really a basis to honestly claim 23 hrs.

    Otherwise, I'm excited to see what improvements have been made for x86 on ARM.  If this thing garners good reviews and turns out to be viable, I might just pick one up around May 2020 when they will have likely depreciated by 40-50%
    Funny. 
  • Reply 5 of 22
    mjtomlinmjtomlin Posts: 1,908member
    sirozha said:
    Can’t innovate my ass. 

    There’s nothing innovative about this laptop. Nice, maybe. Innovative, nope.

    But of course that was said by someone who belittles Apple’s work at trying to detect dementia via their devices using ML, motion detection, and habits ... that’s real innovation; taking current tech and making new uses out of it.
    pscooter63chaickawatto_cobra
  • Reply 6 of 22
    sdw2001sdw2001 Posts: 17,044member
    It still runs windows.
    seanjwatto_cobra
  • Reply 7 of 22
    Arm hardware is arm hardware. It’s literally non-news. 

    The real news news is that me now makes a full version of Windows that runs on arm. 

    Looks like theyvecbeen paying attention to apple rumors. Again. 
    chaickawatto_cobra
  • Reply 8 of 22
    SoliSoli Posts: 9,178member
    The real news news is that me now makes a full version of Windows that runs on arm.
    This was news when MS unveiled Windows RT almost 9 years ago and it's been on the market nearly 7 years.
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 9 of 22
    scapalscapal Posts: 14member
    Use LumaFusion on the 11" iPad Pro and you’ll understand Apple is already there, in a more innovative and efficient way.
    The iPad Pro along with iPadOs is becoming the Intel MacBook replacement.
    iCloud servers may be the next ones to use Apple A processors, imho.
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 10 of 22
    The 23 hour battery life is actually so misleading that in many countries this would be deemed false advertising.

    There is no reasonable expectation that a person would use this device while turning off key hardware and limiting the use to just watching a locally-stored 23 hour long video.

    To actually go out and tout this battery life as a selling-feature is deceitful business conduct. (But not surprising for this company, if one has noticed their other recent offerings.)
    pscooter63watto_cobra
  • Reply 11 of 22

    Arm hardware is arm hardware. It’s literally non-news. 

    The real news news is that me now makes a full version of Windows that runs on arm. 

    Looks like theyvecbeen paying attention to apple rumors. Again. 
    Windows for arm has been available for many years, it has been a commercial failure due to the inability to run x86 software on it. (I.E. It is incompatible with usual windows applications.)

    Support for non “x86” based platforms is not all that unusual for Microsoft, who once made it’s operating system software for a range of hardware platforms including MIPS, Alpha, ARM, and PowerPC.
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 12 of 22
    If this thing garners good reviews and turns out to be viable, I might just pick one up around May 2020 when they will have likely depreciated by 40-50%
    You mean when they go EOL then?

    How long will Samsung/Microsoft guarantee updates etc for them?  With all the documented issues with Surface things and especially their short life before they are EOL'd I'd be very careful about spending hard earned money on things like this.
    As they say, the devil will be in the details of the EULA that is burried 10 stories down in Samsungs HQ and guarded by a very hungry Tiger. :)
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 13 of 22
    If this thing garners good reviews and turns out to be viable, I might just pick one up around May 2020 when they will have likely depreciated by 40-50%
    You mean when they go EOL then?

    How long will Samsung/Microsoft guarantee updates etc for them?  With all the documented issues with Surface things and especially their short life before they are EOL'd I'd be very careful about spending hard earned money on things like this.
    As they say, the devil will be in the details of the EULA that is burried 10 stories down in Samsungs HQ and guarded by a very hungry Tiger. :)
    This is going to sound snarky but I promise it's not.  Here goes.  I live in the real world.  I buy products for what they can do at the time of purchase.  I recently replaced 4 older iPads ranging from the OG through the 1st Air.  All of them were EOL, yet all of them worked fine as consumption devices.  I didn't need to replace any of them.  Amazon had the 2018 9.7 iPad so cheap that I impulse purchase 2... that I'll probably still own beyond EOL.  EOL is a forum argument point, not a real world concern for most people imo.  I guarantee there are tons of forum members who have devices, Apple and non-Apple, that are beyond EOL and those devices are working just fine.  I'd even bet you're one of them too.  

    To answer your question directly.  MS will, based on their history, update this machine every Tuesday (ugggh) until I am long dead.  Samsung will try (I won't let them unless it's security related) to update their suite of software as long as they can ping the machine.  This isn't Android so trying to use Android arguments really don't work here.
    muthuk_vanalingamFileMakerFeller
  • Reply 14 of 22
    macplusplusmacplusplus Posts: 1,888member
    Display resolution and storage type not mentioned on Samsung’s site. Most probably 1080p. Any idea about storage?
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 15 of 22
    Display resolution and storage type not mentioned on Samsung’s site. Most probably 1080p. Any idea about storage?
    Here you go bud:
    Galaxy Book S Specs
    • CPU: 1.8GHz Qualcomm Snapdragon 8cx (octa-core, 7nm, 64-bit; up to 2.84 GHz)
    • Memory: 8GB LPDDR4X.
    • Storage: 256GB – 512GB SSD; up to 1TB microSD.
    • OS: Windows 10 Home or Pro.
    • Display: 13.3-inch FHD (1,920 x 1,080) TFT touchscreen (16:9)
    • Ports: 2 x USB-C 3.1, microSD reader, 3.5mm audio jack.
  • Reply 16 of 22
    macplusplusmacplusplus Posts: 1,888member
    Display resolution and storage type not mentioned on Samsung’s site. Most probably 1080p. Any idea about storage?
    Here you go bud:
    Galaxy Book S Specs
    • CPU: 1.8GHz Qualcomm Snapdragon 8cx (octa-core, 7nm, 64-bit; up to 2.84 GHz)
    • Memory: 8GB LPDDR4X.
    • Storage: 256GB – 512GB SSD; up to 1TB microSD.
    • OS: Windows 10 Home or Pro.
    • Display: 13.3-inch FHD (1,920 x 1,080) TFT touchscreen (16:9)
    • Ports: 2 x USB-C 3.1, microSD reader, 3.5mm audio jack.
    I correctly guessed 1080p. What about SSD type? Probably not NVMe, because it is a derivative of Thunderbolt.

    I also looked for something that would please to port freaks but there is none except the microSD, only two USB-C. I am curious how port freaks will react to that  >:)
    FileMakerFellerwatto_cobra
  • Reply 17 of 22

    Arm hardware is arm hardware. It’s literally non-news. 

    The real news news is that me now makes a full version of Windows that runs on arm. 

    Looks like theyvecbeen paying attention to apple rumors. Again. 
    Windows for arm has been available for many years, it has been a commercial failure due to the inability to run x86 software on it. (I.E. It is incompatible with usual windows applications.)

    Support for non “x86” based platforms is not all that unusual for Microsoft, who once made it’s operating system software for a range of hardware platforms including MIPS, Alpha, ARM, and PowerPC.
    I was wondering how this works with a Snapdragon chip.  So, this laptop won't run ANY normal Windows apps?  It only runs apps written for ARM chips?  If so, that makes this a very expensive media player.
    macpluspluswatto_cobra
  • Reply 18 of 22
    ITGUYINSD said:

    Arm hardware is arm hardware. It’s literally non-news. 

    The real news news is that me now makes a full version of Windows that runs on arm. 

    Looks like theyvecbeen paying attention to apple rumors. Again. 
    Windows for arm has been available for many years, it has been a commercial failure due to the inability to run x86 software on it. (I.E. It is incompatible with usual windows applications.)

    Support for non “x86” based platforms is not all that unusual for Microsoft, who once made it’s operating system software for a range of hardware platforms including MIPS, Alpha, ARM, and PowerPC.
    I was wondering how this works with a Snapdragon chip.  So, this laptop won't run ANY normal Windows apps?  It only runs apps written for ARM chips?  If so, that makes this a very expensive media player.
    It runs full Windows 10.  Either Windows 10 Home or Windows 10 Pro depending on config.  Probably why Nadella was on stage. 
    Galaxy Book S Specs
    • CPU: 1.8GHz Qualcomm Snapdragon 8cx (octa-core, 7nm, 64-bit; up to 2.84 GHz)
    • Memory: 8GB LPDDR4X.
    • Storage: 256GB – 512GB SSD; up to 1TB microSD.
    • OS: Windows 10 Home or Pro.
    • Display: 13.3-inch FHD (1,920 x 1,080) TFT touchscreen (16:9)
    • Ports: 2 x USB-C 3.1, microSD reader, 3.5mm audio jack.
  • Reply 19 of 22
    wood1208wood1208 Posts: 1,988member
    At some point, Apple will have ARM Macbook/s with Apple's own 5G/LTE chip support.
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 20 of 22
    JWSCJWSC Posts: 490member
    The Samsung Galaxy Book 2 was carried (sold) through Verizon at 41.66/month for 24 months.  The Galaxy Book S will probably be similar...

    Will the MacBook Pro or Air ever get LTE?  Maybe a 12” MacBook (A Series) LTE in 2020?

    AI should kick the tires on the Samsung Book S as a college machine.  Colleges seem to prefer Windows for engineering majors, and Macs for Arts...  Will a Windows on ARM even run the software? Or, is this a hobbled Windows machine that will run little more than Microsoft Office?

    If the software is well behaved and doesn’t go around Windows OS by directly accessing the ARM processor, it should work fine.

    FileMakerFeller
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