Nike Adapt Huarache can be controlled via Siri, Apple Watch

Posted:
in General Discussion edited August 29
Nike has announced the the September launch of the Nike Adapt Huarache, an athletic shoe that can be controlled with the Apple Watch and Siri Shortcuts.

Nike Adapt Huarache


Nike has gone public with their newest iteration of their Huarache, a sneaker originally designed in 1991. Upon launch, the Huarache was designed to hug an athletes foot in a way that offered more support with less downsides.

The new Nike Adapt Huarache still follows the same concept but now features some impressive smart upgrades.

The minimally-branded Adapt Huarache now works with Nike's FitAdapt technology. FitAdapt is an intelligent platform that updates and evolves along with the user, allowing for a wider array of personal preference.

The shoe is designed to work in various environments, something that one would hope a contemporary shoe is capable of doing. Unlike traditional shoes, however, the Adapt Huarache can change to suit the users needs.

Nike Adapt Huarache in yellow


The lacing system runs mid-foot and is controlled via a motor that works with the Nike Adapt app. A universal login takes a user to a Huarache-themed App, where they can view a number of preset fit recommendations based on foot type and activity.

The app can also be controlled by both the Apple Watch and Siri, giving users the ability to adjust their shoes on the fly.

Nike will be launching the Adapt Huarache line on September 13 at select retailers and Nike's online store.

Comments

  • Reply 1 of 9
    Hey Siri, run faster!
    macguiwatto_cobraseanj
  • Reply 2 of 9
    Siri, activate instant kill.
    blurpbleepbloopwatto_cobra
  • Reply 3 of 9
    Rayz2016Rayz2016 Posts: 4,764member
    Siri-controlled underpants. 
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 5 of 9
    entropysentropys Posts: 1,850member
    calling Marty Macfly!
    edited August 29 watto_cobra
  • Reply 6 of 9
    emig647emig647 Posts: 2,414member
    entropys said:
    calling Marty Macfly!
    You laugh, and I used to as well, until I considered the use case of those with Parkisons (MJF) and those in wheelchairs. 
    SpamSandwichwatto_cobra
  • Reply 7 of 9
    SpamSandwichSpamSandwich Posts: 31,401member
    emig647 said:
    entropys said:
    calling Marty Macfly!
    You laugh, and I used to as well, until I considered the use case of those with Parkisons (MJF) and those in wheelchairs. 
    Indeed. Limited mobility and dexterity will need to be considerations for many consumer goods designs as the vast public demographic is still aging Baby Boomers.
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 8 of 9
    macguimacgui Posts: 1,464member
    emig647 said:
    entropys said:
    calling Marty Macfly!
    You laugh, and I used to as well, until I considered the use case of those with Parkisons (MJF) and those in wheelchairs. 
    And I still laugh. That is a separate thing from making something to aid disabled/impaired people. And these Nikes aren't it.

    These shoes are remotely adjustable, to be tuned for performance, and possibly after the run, for comfort. They do not lace themselves. There's nothing to indicate that these shoes would help people with various impairments.

    While I was convalescing from a debilitating injury, I could have used shoes that would allow me to insert my foot and then close themselves. When I was able to walk it was still a couple of months until I could put on shoes myself and work the Velcro-type straps.
  • Reply 9 of 9
    Interesting that the author claims the Nike Huarache shoe originated from 1991. I had a pair already in the first half of the 1980:s. Of course they had a slightly different design (slime like a sandal), but the name was exactly the same.
Sign In or Register to comment.