'By Innovation Only' new iPhone event, Apple saves Amazon, Fraser Spiers on the AppleInsid...

Posted:
in General Discussion edited September 9
This week on the AppleInsider Podcast, Victor and William talk about the By Innovation Only September event, Fraser Speirs joins to talk about Chromebooks for schools, and Apple saves the Amazon.

Apple's historic rainbow logo (left) next to the September event invitation image (right)
Apple's historic rainbow logo (left) next to the September event invitation image (right)


AppleInsider editor Victor Marks and writer William Gallagher discuss:
  • By Innovation Only - the invites to the September 10th event have gone out. Are you getting a new iPhone?
  • Fraser Speirs, head teacher of Cedars School of Excellence talks about the 1:1 iPad program they ran for ten years, and why they're switching to Chromebook
  • Apple releases iOS 13.1 beta before releasing 13.0 publicly. This is weird. We're through the looking glass, people.
  • Glasgow schools are rolling out a huge 52,000 iPads program
  • Apple is working on improving Siri's privacy protections and opt-out options.
  • Apple is putting up cash to help save the Amazon rainforests from fire destruction.
We like reader email -- send us your comments and concerns!.

The show is available on iTunes and your favorite podcast apps by searching for "AppleInsider." Click here to listen, subscribe, and don't forget to rate our show.


Listen to the embedded SoundCloud feed below:

Follow our hosts on Twitter: @WGallagher and @vmarks.

Feedback and comments are always appreciated. Please contact the AppleInsider podcast at [email protected] and follow us on Twitter @appleinsider, plus Facebook and Instagram.

Those interested in sponsoring the show can reach out to us at [email protected].

Comments

  • Reply 1 of 13
    You might like to change the title. "Apple saves Amazon" would suggest that that behmoth purveyor of tat named Amazon has been saved by Apple.
    The text has the missing 'the' which resolves the confusion.
  • Reply 2 of 13
    You might like to change the title. "Apple saves Amazon" would suggest that that behmoth purveyor of tat named Amazon has been saved by Apple.
    The text has the missing 'the' which resolves the confusion.
    That may be the intent.
  • Reply 3 of 13
    coolfactorcoolfactor Posts: 1,534member
    I hope there's some deep meaning behind that jelly Apple logo. Otherwise, what's the point? They didn't even get the colours correct.

  • Reply 4 of 13
    I hope there's some deep meaning behind that jelly Apple logo. Otherwise, what's the point? They didn't even get the colours correct.

    Define “correct”. Those look very much like the five colors from the jelly iMacs, even if the shades aren’t identical.



    As for the point, there may not be. The invites don’t always have deep secret meanings. 
  • Reply 5 of 13
    mcdavemcdave Posts: 1,178member
    Fraser Speirs’ comments seemed to illustrate how education has followed business in putting provider convenience before customer experience. He seems to be really bitter about the demise of iTunesU whilst ignoring other benefits.

    A few confusing points for me as Apple has been pushing;
    - document persistence  since before Google got into Apps and most Apps don’t have ‘Save’ buttons.
    - non-file-based sharing, just push the content from the App.
    - cloud persistence with iCloud (and were even lambasted for not presenting it as a ‘drive’). Did Fraser forget to turn iCloud on?
    - did they not use Jamf for device/content config/deployment? Or Classroom Apps for management?

    I am with him on Apple dropping content/courseware production tools. And not turning macOS cloud-first as iOS has been since iCloud (even if he fails to acknowledge it).  They deserve to lose the classroom which is a shame because iOS Apps win over Chrome/Web Apps any day.

    Sort it out Apple.


    jdoc
  • Reply 6 of 13
    I shared this on twitter and some people tend to see the same:

    This gives me some medical vibe: the yellow and red parts look more solid, reminding me of anatomical parts (fat yellow and muscle red). The translucent parts look like an X-ray effect.

    Today just realized the blue section is out of place. Green should be next to yellow to follow the rainbow spectrum, even in the original rainbow Apple logo. 

  • Reply 7 of 13
    fastasleepfastasleep Posts: 3,171member

    Today just realized the blue section is out of place. Green should be next to yellow to follow the rainbow spectrum, even in the original rainbow Apple logo. 

    You're assuming they intended it to represent a rainbow.
  • Reply 8 of 13
    felix01felix01 Posts: 253member
    Would it be too burdensome to ask that you at least include the time so I can set an iCal event? Or are you intentionally driving me to click on a competitor's story?   
  • Reply 9 of 13
    I hope there's some deep meaning behind that jelly Apple logo. Otherwise, what's the point? They didn't even get the colours correct.

    Define “correct”. Those look very much like the five colors from the jelly iMacs, even if the shades aren’t identical.



    As for the point, there may not be. The invites don’t always have deep secret meanings. 
    You're right about there possibly not being a deeper meaning to the design.  But I'm pretty sure coolfactor is referencing "correct" in relation to the colors of the rainbow logo being compared to the invitation logo.  

    Personally, I think the invitation logo references some AR, VR, MR focus Apple is going to highlight. 
  • Reply 10 of 13
    felix01 said:
    Would it be too burdensome to ask that you at least include the time so I can set an iCal event? Or are you intentionally driving me to click on a competitor's story?   
    10:00AM
  • Reply 11 of 13
    jdocjdoc Posts: 10member
    mcdave said:
    Fraser Speirs’ comments seemed to illustrate how education has followed business in putting provider convenience before customer experience. He seems to be really bitter about the demise of iTunesU whilst ignoring other benefits.

    A few confusing points for me as Apple has been pushing;
    - document persistence  since before Google got into Apps and most Apps don’t have ‘Save’ buttons.
    - non-file-based sharing, just push the content from the App.
    - cloud persistence with iCloud (and were even lambasted for not presenting it as a ‘drive’). Did Fraser forget to turn iCloud on?
    - did they not use Jamf for device/content config/deployment? Or Classroom Apps for management?

    I am with him on Apple dropping content/courseware production tools. And not turning macOS cloud-first as iOS has been since iCloud (even if he fails to acknowledge it).  They deserve to lose the classroom which is a shame because iOS Apps win over Chrome/Web Apps any day.

    Sort it out Apple.


    I agree with everything said here. For sure, Apple dropped the ball in the education market. But Google is providing 2 very big incentives to the education market that Apple has yet to match: 1. Much lower cost; 2. Simplicity for the admins and IT folks. Neither of which address the gaping holes in effective teaching methods for our children. My issues with Googles platform are many. The biggest pet peeves, however, surround lack of pedagogical innovation (flipped classroom, spaced learning, creative content production, gamification, etc) and privacy issues. Fraser glossed over the pedagogical issue by dismissing its importance- he’s giving them the tools they’ll be using in the ‘real world’. We’ve heard this excuse before, when Microsoft pushed their Office suite on all of our youth, so in that sense, welcome back to the 1990’s. My kids use Chromebooks for school- they’re terrible for creating anything except documents and presentations. Heck, why not use Office for that? Aren’t they still king of the hill in the business world? And it really is sad (maybe comical) watching people twist themselves into pretzels trying to explain away the real privacy issues that have plagued and will continue to plague Google. The latest: https://thehill.com/policy/technology/459854-google-youtube-fined-170-million-for-violating-childrens-privacy Time and time again, Google ‘promises’ to maintain some semblance of privacy restrictions- Fraser mentions a ‘different set of privacy rules’ for children. I won’t hold my breath.
    neutrino23
  • Reply 12 of 13
    I disagree with Fraser Speirs that all data will move to the cloud. Some will, no doubt. It is very convenient to keep documents on iCloud and open them on the iMac or the iPad as needed.

    However, I think there are valid cases for keeping your documents local. 

    The first is long term security. I wouldn't feel comfortable keeping my tax records or important photographs or things I've been writing for decades only in the cloud. This may work for him for the length of a school term, but I would be afraid of this disappearing after several years. I would want permanent copies held safely somewhere local.

    There may also be legal reasons for not using the cloud. My company does not let us connect our corporate devices to iCloud. I don't understand this clearly but I believe it has to do with us possibly having some customer data and being required to have control over that data. Cloud storage might work for the corporation eventually when they implement their own cloud which they have legal control over.

    Finally, there is the privacy consideration. I would not want to let Google or Amazon have access to my data.
  • Reply 13 of 13
    Mike WuertheleMike Wuerthele Posts: 4,876administrator
    felix01 said:
    Would it be too burdensome to ask that you at least include the time so I can set an iCal event? Or are you intentionally driving me to click on a competitor's story?   
    Fortunately, the time for the event is in the third paragraph of post linked in this piece that focuses on the event.


Sign In or Register to comment.