Review: Zendure SuperMini battery is small but mighty

Posted:
in General Discussion
Zendure SuperMini is a compact battery that is smaller than a credit card and can still support Fast Charge on Apple's latest iPhones.

The Zendure SuperMini is the smallest 10KmAh battery we've seen yet
The Zendure SuperMini is the smallest 10KmAh battery we've seen yet


We've reviewed Zendure batteries in the past, most recently the massive SuperTank. While SuperTank has an enormous capacity, the new SuperMini is ultra-compact.

SuperMini borrows the same design that made its other battery packs popular with ridges running from top to bottom and only a single button used to control the battery and check the remaining charge via a series of LEDs.

Mini but mighty

The SuperMini has a smaller footprint than Apple Card
The SuperMini has a smaller footprint than Apple Card


SuperMini is a 10,000mAh battery pack that comes with a footprint smaller than that of a credit card and a width of only an inch. For comparison, Anker's smallest 10,000mAh battery pack is larger in both the width and the height, measuring 3.6-inch by 2.3-inch versus the SuperMini's 3.1-inch by 2.2-inch dimensions.

That difference may not seem like a lot. For a pocketable device, it can be significant.

This tiny size doesn't mean it isn't powerful, however.

There are two outputs on SuperMini -- one USB-C and the other USB-A. The ports are positioned on opposing sides of the battery pack which can be nice if you are using the USB-C port to charge the battery and the USB-A to charge a device out the other side.

SuperMini can Fast Charge an iPhone
SuperMini can Fast Charge an iPhone


The Type-C port is capable of 18W and supports Power Delivery whereas the USB-A port is also capable of 18W if using QuickCharge 3 -- something the iPhone doesn't support.

That speed is very useful for both iPhones as well as iPads. That means it will support Fast Charge on iPhone, providing 50% charge in only 30 minutes. Since iPhone 11 Pro comes with a USB-C Lightning cable in the box, we expect many more users will want these faster 18W chargers.

Low power, not no power

A problem we usually encounter with battery packs is issues charging low-draw devices. Think Fitbits, headphones, and the Apple Watch -- all which draw a trickle amount of power compared to the massive requirements we see from phones or tablets.

The draw can be so small that a normal battery pack will just turn off and enter standby mode rather than continue to charge. If you've picked up a cheap battery pack and tried to charge these smaller devices you know the struggle it can be.

X-Charge mode can charge low-draw devices like AirPods or Apple Watch
X-Charge mode can charge low-draw devices like AirPods or Apple Watch


Zendure negates this issue with X-Charge mode. By double-tapping the button, the LEDs will start to flash notating that it is in this special low-power draw mode. Here we were able to charge our Apple Watch and MW07 headphones without any issue.

The downside to low power mode is that it needs to be disabled after being used or the LEDs will continue to pulsate.

A portable powerhouse

SuperMini really does qualify as super. 10KmAh isn't going to power you for days at a time but it the perfect amount for a night out or even overnight. The port selection is solid though we'd have preferred dual USB-C rather than one USB-C and one USB-A, but we understand the decision. Many people using Apple Watch likely use the bundled USB-A charging puck so if using this overnight with a watch and a phone, USB-A is required.

The battery pack feels durable, strong, full-featured enough to be out go-to for compact power.

Zendure SuperMini in silver, black, and Blue Horizon
Zendure SuperMini in silver, black, and Blue Horizon


Three colorways are available for SuperMini. There is the iconic silver, the classic black, and a particularly stunning electric blue Zendure is calling Blue Horizon.

Rating: 4.5 out of 5

Where to buy

SuperMini is now available to back on Indiegogo. Early birds can grab the battery pack for $34, or $45 off retail price. At time of publication, SuperMini has raised over $235,000. Well above the $30K goal.

Check out the rest of Zendure's lineup over on Amazon.

Remember, backing a project on Indiegogo or Kickstarter is not a guarantee you will receive the product, you are simply pledging your support behind the company. Fortunately, Zendure has successfully completed more than seven campaigns and has delivered on each one so the risk is relatively low.

Comments

  • Reply 1 of 8
    elijahgelijahg Posts: 1,014member
    Seems pretty good, especially having two different charging outputs. However, 10KmAh?! That unit does not exist, you're looking for 10Ah: 10 amp hours.
    edited September 12 watto_cobra
  • Reply 2 of 8
    This thing looks like a suitcase.
  • Reply 3 of 8
    Can it charge two devices at once?
  • Reply 4 of 8
    GG1GG1 Posts: 282member
    elijahg said:
    Seems pretty good, especially having two different charging outputs. However, 10KmAh?! That unit does not exist, you're looking for 10Ah: 10 amp hours.
    I'm waiting for the MegaMicro 10MμAh model...
    chiaelijahgwatto_cobra
  • Reply 5 of 8
    GG1 said:
    elijahg said:
    Seems pretty good, especially having two different charging outputs. However, 10KmAh?! That unit does not exist, you're looking for 10Ah: 10 amp hours.
    I'm waiting for the MegaMicro 10MμAh model...
    Let's just skip right to the Terapico.
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 6 of 8
    elijahg said:
    Seems pretty good, especially having two different charging outputs. However, 10KmAh?! That unit does not exist, you're looking for 10Ah: 10 amp hours.
    It's one and the same. Just bad phrasing on AI's part. The correct way to specify is to write 10,000 mAh, not 10kmAh. Power banks are always rated in mAh, not Ah.
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 7 of 8
    macguimacgui Posts: 1,519member
    The correct way to specify is to write 10,000 mAh, not 10kmAh. Power banks are always rated in mAh, not Ah.
    That's a load of bullshit. Either 10,000mAh or 10Ah is correct, as they are indeed the same thing.

    There is no EE standard for rating power banks, ergo neither is incorrect.

    mAh is only used because early power banks had very little capacity, and mAh seems so much bigger than Ah, to people not used to using the Metric system.

    It's marketing convention, not electrical standard. Like pricing things at $9.99 instead of $10, the former being so much cheaper. Following convention does have marketing aspect that actually benefits the consumer who's unfamiliar with the pesky metric system – it makes it easy to compare different capacities without trying to figure which is more –10,000mAh or 10Ah.

    I will say probably nobody uses 10KmAh, but it's still an accurate value..
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 8 of 8
    @AppleInsider - Please test the capacity of these batteries while reviewing.  Some MFGs lie about capacity (Zendure is one of them).  You can test with this nice data logging USB/USB-C meter:  https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B073R7YRM9/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_search_asin_title?ie=UTF8&psc=1

    Zendure has a bad track record with regards to their recent battery packs.  I was a Kickstarter backer of their SuperTank.  Stated delivery was May/June.  They stalled, lied and started to deliver in August, AFTER THEY WERE AVAILABLE FOR SALE ON AMAZON & B&H Photo!!!  There are often delays in Kickstarter project I back, but none have ever lied/delayed like Zendure.  Look at the unhappy backer comments:  https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/zendure/supertank-power-your-phone-for-a-week-recharge-in/comments .  There are the same comments/concerns on Zendure's SuperTank listing on Indigogo.

    And the product that I have does not meet the advertised specifications.  They stated charge in an hour with their SuperPort (part of the Kickstarter campaign), and it's 2+ hours.  My Apple 87W USB-C adapter charged the SuperTank faster, at 60W (USB-C PD standard is 60W, and then 100W - there is no 87W in USB-C PD standard), than the SuperPort did!

    I have data logging USB power meters.  The device only puts out the rated 100W on USB-C PD until it drops to about 50-60% capacity.  Then it drops to 60W output.

    My meters shows the SuperTank only holds < 23500mAh - it's rated at 27000mAh.  This is considering loss in cables, battery, etc.

    So reviewers, please, "Trust, but verify!"
    watto_cobra
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