Mac Pro now available with $2600 8TB SSD option

Posted:
in Current Mac Hardware
Following its initial launch without the option, Apple has updated the ordering page for the modular Mac Pro with a new storage capacity, with customers now able to configure a version with up to 8 terabytes of built-in storage.




When the new Mac Pro initially became available to order, customers were able to order up to 4TB of built-in SSD storage, comprising of two 2TB modules. Specification pages and other marketing materials advised of configurations where 8TB were possible, but that option wasn't offered within the configuration screen on the Apple website.

An update to the sales page on Thursday adds in the extra option, which adds two 4TB SSD modules to the system, and brings the total list of options up to five: 256GB, 1TB, 2TB, 4TB, and 8TB.

Selecting 8TB of storage is a costly upgrade to make, with a move from the base 256GB SSD to the 8TB version increasing the price of the Mac Pro by $2,600. A similar upgrade from 256GB to 4TB raises the price by $1,400.

The change in storage capacities is the only real change made to the Mac Pro ordering process, but more alternatives for other components are still on the way. The page advises options to use one or two Radeon Pro W5700X GPUs with 16GB of GDDR6 memory apiece will be available to add to an order "soon."

The extra storage now means the most expensive configuration of hardware for the Mac Pro is now $53,948, which includes peripherals and wheels but not the Pro Display XDR nor pre-installed software. Previously, the maximum hardware configuration possible was $52,748.
«1

Comments

  • Reply 1 of 24
    This machine is no slouch.

    guscat1983watto_cobra
  • Reply 2 of 24
    finally
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 3 of 24
    Why not get two?
    fastasleepmarklark1983watto_cobra
  • Reply 4 of 24
    Is this storage much faster than a PCIe board with Nvme? Seems like the economical way to go is get enough for your OS/apps and then do PCIe for bulk storage and move your user folder there even if need be. 
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 5 of 24
    sflocalsflocal Posts: 6,020member
    Is this storage much faster than a PCIe board with Nvme? Seems like the economical way to go is get enough for your OS/apps and then do PCIe for bulk storage and move your user folder there even if need be. 
    My understanding is that the Mac Pro has two NVMe slots, with both slots configured to one as one with RAID0.  
  • Reply 6 of 24
    cpsrocpsro Posts: 3,063member
    Is this storage much faster than a PCIe board with Nvme? Seems like the economical way to go is get enough for your OS/apps and then do PCIe for bulk storage and move your user folder there even if need be. 
    I plan to use 8TB in both! ;)  Will see how fast the Sonnet card works in the MP, but expect it to be much faster than the built-in SSD due to twice the SSD card slots. Barefeats.com benchmarked the Sonnet in an old Mac Pro at nearly 6GB/s.
    Now, why do wheels add a month to the delivery time? Wheels should make it faster. :p

    Update: Otherworld Computing (macsales.com) is now selling a PCI SSD for Mac Pro that provides "over 6GB/s real world" speed.
    edited December 2019 fastasleep1983watto_cobra
  • Reply 7 of 24
    neilmneilm Posts: 964member
    They're not standard NVMe slots, and not structured as a RAID 0 configuration, a term that applies to arrays of separate drives that could otherwise function as independent units. The Apple Pro's "drive" modules contain NVRAM memory chips and support circuitry, but no drive controller. That function is handled separately as part of Apple's proprietary T2 chip, which is on the main logic board. 

    It seems to me that they're better thought of as storage memory modules, almost like regular RAM modules, except with persistent memory. They're essential components of an SSD, but not an SSD themselves.

    This is unfortunate for Mac Pro owners who might want to substitute their own solid state storage for the Apple modules. Of course they could use regular PCIe drive cards.
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 8 of 24
    I used to visit Apple's site and build towers that topped out at 11 grand, then drooling before closing window. This new Mac Pro is a lot more fun, and keeps getting better!
    StrangeDaysguscat1983watto_cobrachia
  • Reply 9 of 24
    lkrupplkrupp Posts: 10,336member
    neilm said:
    They're not standard NVMe slots, and not structured as a RAID 0 configuration, a term that applies to arrays of separate drives that could otherwise function as independent units. The Apple Pro's "drive" modules contain NVRAM memory chips and support circuitry, but no drive controller. That function is handled separately as part of Apple's proprietary T2 chip, which is on the main logic board. 

    It seems to me that they're better thought of as storage memory modules, almost like regular RAM modules, except with persistent memory. They're essential components of an SSD, but not an SSD themselves.

    This is unfortunate for Mac Pro owners who might want to substitute their own solid state storage for the Apple modules. Of course they could use regular PCIe drive cards.

    What will it take for you to understand that the organizations this machine is targeted at will not tinker with third party add-ons. These machines will be configured stock Apple and purchased by companies who also pay $80.000.00 for a RED 8K camera. To repeat the obvious, this machine is not designed for tinkerers and hobbyists. The users this machine was built for do not have the time or inclination to play with “PCIe drive cards” or RAM from OWC. They’ve got real work to do and deadlines to meet. They want instant support from Apple, not arguments over which third party component is causing trouble.

    edited December 2019 sweetheart777mwhite80s_Apple_GuyRayz2016watto_cobra
  • Reply 10 of 24
    but, but, but...
    I want 16tb.
    1983rezwitswatto_cobra
  • Reply 11 of 24
    neilmneilm Posts: 964member
    lkrupp said:
    neilm said:
    They're not standard NVMe slots, and not structured as a RAID 0 configuration, a term that applies to arrays of separate drives that could otherwise function as independent units. The Apple Pro's "drive" modules contain NVRAM memory chips and support circuitry, but no drive controller. That function is handled separately as part of Apple's proprietary T2 chip, which is on the main logic board. 

    It seems to me that they're better thought of as storage memory modules, almost like regular RAM modules, except with persistent memory. They're essential components of an SSD, but not an SSD themselves.

    This is unfortunate for Mac Pro owners who might want to substitute their own solid state storage for the Apple modules. Of course they could use regular PCIe drive cards.

    What will it take for you to understand that the organizations this machine is targeted at will not tinker with third party add-ons. These machines will be configured stock Apple and purchased by companies who also pay $80.000.00 for a RED 8K camera. To repeat the obvious, this machine is not designed for tinkerers and hobbyists. The users this machine was built for do not have the time or inclination to play with “PCIe drive cards” or RAM from OWC. They’ve got real work to do and deadlines to meet. They want instant support from Apple, not arguments over which third party component is causing trouble.

    Thanks for your irrelevant rebuttal to an argument I didn’t make. If you think you understand what I understand, you don’t.
    edited December 2019 cy_starkmanmuthuk_vanalingam
  • Reply 12 of 24
    @lkrupp ;
    Indeed. I amused myself with a Linus Tech Tips (LTT) YouTube video last night where he put together an impressive petabyte disk array.

    While I certainly have the chops to do such a thing myself, my hourly billing rate (and that of many professionals) dictates that any time spent worrying about hardware issues or downtime due to flaky third-party memory is simply not worth it.  An hour spent diagnosing a problem that causes my team to lose an hour of work is a five-figure loss, not to mention the loss of reputation.

    I am hoping Apple comes to market with a still more Pro Mac Pro. Maybe dual-socket CPU complex for twice the cores. And I have projects that approach 8 TB, and would eagerly buy 32 TB for an extra $10K.

    An 8K pro sensor (just the sensor, not the whole camera) costs more than a fully-loaded Mac Pro. See https://www.red.com/dsmc2 High quality glass (lenses) can be five figures easily.

    The reason why more "pro" users aren't responding to this nonsense about the Mac Pro being "expensive" is that they're too busy making money, not trying to save $500. Speaking of which...
    FileMakerFellerviclauyycdewmemwhitestompyguscatwatto_cobrachia
  • Reply 13 of 24
    sflocalsflocal Posts: 6,020member
    An 8K pro sensor (just the sensor, not the whole camera) costs more than a fully-loaded Mac Pro. See https://www.red.com/dsmc2 High quality glass (lenses) can be five figures easily.

    The reason why more "pro" users aren't responding to this nonsense about the Mac Pro being "expensive" is that they're too busy making money, not trying to save $500. Speaking of which...
    Shhh...  You don't want logic and real-world use to upset the weekend wannabe-"pros" that think they know what real "pros" want.
    viclauyycmwhiteguscatwatto_cobrachia
  • Reply 14 of 24
    Is this storage much faster than a PCIe board with Nvme? Seems like the economical way to go is get enough for your OS/apps and then do PCIe for bulk storage and move your user folder there even if need be. 
    OWC just announced a bootable PCIe card with up to 8TB that is 2x as fast (6000MB/s) $1900, I think.
    fastasleepwatto_cobra
  • Reply 15 of 24
    sflocal said:
    Is this storage much faster than a PCIe board with Nvme? Seems like the economical way to go is get enough for your OS/apps and then do PCIe for bulk storage and move your user folder there even if need be. 
    My understanding is that the Mac Pro has two NVMe slots, with both slots configured to one as one with RAID0.  
    Wrong — they're proprietary modules/slots, and that's not what I even asked. 
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 16 of 24
    Finally the Mac Pro catches up with my 16-inch MacBook Pro!
  • Reply 17 of 24

    lkrupp said:
    What will it take for you to understand that the organizations this machine is targeted at will not tinker with third party add-ons. These machines will be configured stock Apple and purchased by companies who also pay $80.000.00 for a RED 8K camera. To repeat the obvious, this machine is not designed for tinkerers and hobbyists. The users this machine was built for do not have the time or inclination to play with “PCIe drive cards” or RAM from OWC. They’ve got real work to do and deadlines to meet. They want instant support from Apple, not arguments over which third party component is causing trouble.
    Uh, wrong — that's the whole fucking point of having 8 PCIe slots, to use them for things like fast storage and other third party expansion options. Same reason Promise is making their drive sleds for this box as well. 
    edited December 2019 rain22muthuk_vanalingam
  • Reply 18 of 24

    Is this storage much faster than a PCIe board with Nvme? Seems like the economical way to go is get enough for your OS/apps and then do PCIe for bulk storage and move your user folder there even if need be. 
    OWC just announced a bootable PCIe card with up to 8TB that is 2x as fast (6000MB/s) $1900, I think.
    Interesting. So you could not even use the built in storage at that point, have a faster boot drive, and spend $700 less.
  • Reply 19 of 24
    Rayz2016Rayz2016 Posts: 6,957member
    lkrupp said:
    neilm said:
    They're not standard NVMe slots, and not structured as a RAID 0 configuration, a term that applies to arrays of separate drives that could otherwise function as independent units. The Apple Pro's "drive" modules contain NVRAM memory chips and support circuitry, but no drive controller. That function is handled separately as part of Apple's proprietary T2 chip, which is on the main logic board. 

    It seems to me that they're better thought of as storage memory modules, almost like regular RAM modules, except with persistent memory. They're essential components of an SSD, but not an SSD themselves.

    This is unfortunate for Mac Pro owners who might want to substitute their own solid state storage for the Apple modules. Of course they could use regular PCIe drive cards.

    What will it take for you to understand that the organizations this machine is targeted at will not tinker with third party add-ons. These machines will be configured stock Apple and purchased by companies who also pay $80.000.00 for a RED 8K camera. To repeat the obvious, this machine is not designed for tinkerers and hobbyists. The users this machine was built for do not have the time or inclination to play with “PCIe drive cards” or RAM from OWC. They’ve got real work to do and deadlines to meet. They want instant support from Apple, not arguments over which third party component is causing trouble.

    How many more times is this going to need explaining?


  • Reply 20 of 24
    Rayz2016 said:
    lkrupp said:
    neilm said:
    They're not standard NVMe slots, and not structured as a RAID 0 configuration, a term that applies to arrays of separate drives that could otherwise function as independent units. The Apple Pro's "drive" modules contain NVRAM memory chips and support circuitry, but no drive controller. That function is handled separately as part of Apple's proprietary T2 chip, which is on the main logic board. 

    It seems to me that they're better thought of as storage memory modules, almost like regular RAM modules, except with persistent memory. They're essential components of an SSD, but not an SSD themselves.

    This is unfortunate for Mac Pro owners who might want to substitute their own solid state storage for the Apple modules. Of course they could use regular PCIe drive cards.

    What will it take for you to understand that the organizations this machine is targeted at will not tinker with third party add-ons. These machines will be configured stock Apple and purchased by companies who also pay $80.000.00 for a RED 8K camera. To repeat the obvious, this machine is not designed for tinkerers and hobbyists. The users this machine was built for do not have the time or inclination to play with “PCIe drive cards” or RAM from OWC. They’ve got real work to do and deadlines to meet. They want instant support from Apple, not arguments over which third party component is causing trouble.

    How many more times is this going to need explaining?


    In this case I think he's dead wrong. PCIe storage is absolutely what this Mac is meant for even if (most?) enterprise customers aren't going to necessarily use it.
    watto_cobra
Sign In or Register to comment.