'iPhone 15' will get in-screen Touch ID, 'iPhone Fold' arrives in 2024 says Ming-Chi Kuo

Posted:
in Future Apple Hardware edited September 20
In a note to investors, noted Apple analyst Ming-Chi Kuo predicts that under-display Touch ID will arrive in 2023, plus when he's expecting the long-rumored folding iPhone.

What Touch ID could look like under the display of an iPhone

The note, seen by AppleInsider delves into details about the financial prospects of Apple's iPhone component suppliers. However, in the note, Kuo laid out a timeline for the return of Touch ID to Apple's all-screen iPhone lineup and when he expects a folding iPhone to ship.

Kuo attributes a one-year slip for under-display Touch ID and the folding iPhone to "lower than expected development progress." However, it isn't made clear in the note what the development progress stalls are attributable to.

A 2022 iPhone SE with 5G is also discussed again, with no change in timetable from his previous reports. Also repeated are a "new and more affordable 6.7-[inch] iPhone" and a punch-hole display plus 48 megapixel camera arriving in the 2022 iPhone.

Also in the note, he says that the later-than-expected rollout of the features will "hurt iPhone shipments in 2022 and 2023."

Reports of testing Touch ID in a next-generation iPhone surfaced in January 2021, with a new in-screen optical system accompanying the existing Face ID. By March, Kuo forecast that Apple would not add Touch ID to the iPhone 13, pointing to supply chain data.

Kuo focused on the folding iPhone concept in May of 2021. At the time, he said that Apple's first foldable iPhone would have an 8-inch QHD+ display. The display is predicted to have a 3,200 x 1,800 pixel resolution. If the report is accurate, that is a higher effective resolution panel than Samsung Fold's 7.3-inch QXGA+ screen, with a 16:9 ratio.

Initially, Kuo said that Apple would manufacture between 15 million and 20 million foldable iPhone units in 2023. However, with the latest report, Kuo believes that it will be ready for the traditional iPhone season, but in the fall of 2024.

Read on AppleInsider
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Comments

  • Reply 1 of 29
    What a waste of effort adding touch ID back in - I haven't missed it one little bit since I 'upgraded' to Face ID.
    longpathDBSyncwilliamlondonradarthekatwatto_cobrajony0
  • Reply 2 of 29
    Same for me. Before switching from TouchID, I was curious/skeptical. After switching, I haven’t looked back: it’s sooooo convenient to be logged in before even noticing!
    Incidentally, TouchID might come in handy when your face isn’t in front, like when it’s on a table, or in your pocket before using Apple Pay. But with the latter I use my Apple Watch anyway. 
    edited September 20 longpathDBSyncwatto_cobrajony0
  • Reply 3 of 29
    Kinda ‘heard it all before’ with the rumors around iPhone 11,12,13. Add it in powerbutton if it’s that difficult. I don’t miss it, tbh. 
    I get that apple want to make it working flawless, and that it takes time. not like the hit and miss (literally) on several android devices 
    longpathDBSyncwatto_cobrajony0
  • Reply 4 of 29
    In screen Touch ID will be so much better than Face ID. I like multitasking. I hate having to make sure I’m looking at the phone just right, and with my eyes open for it to unlock (I just went into my settings to turn that off, can’t believe I’ve kept it on for years, and I’m sure I’m not the only one).

    The ability to do double authentication (face and finger) may be helpful for some people. 

    Face ID may not work well if Apple is trying to put everything behind the screen. 
    darkvaderwilliamlondon
  • Reply 5 of 29
    I dont understand why people are so eager to bring touchID back. Its certainly not more secure than FaceID and its not faster than FaceID either. The only reason I could think to bring it back is some sort of double authentication process to get your Drivers License, healthcare record or other super sensitive information to pull up from the secure enclave. First you have to authenticate with FaceID then confirm with touchid?  Just seems cumbersome to me.  

    And now that we have solved the FaceID with mask issue by using Apple Watch, TouchID is really not needed. I cant imagine too many people with an iPhone DONT have at least a Series 3 if they wanted an apple watch at this point.
    caladanianllamawatto_cobra
  • Reply 6 of 29
    With the apparent demise of the mini  after the iPhone 13, I’m holding off on any future upgrade as long as possible.
    williamlondon
  • Reply 7 of 29
    Wait. What about the satellite antenna? The other things are far off enough that "noted" analyst Kuo will have moved those predictions around several times (in some cases, several times more than he has already) until it will be claimed that he was "accurate."

    As for the possibility of a return of TouchID, there are some potential benefits. One is that it could be enabled as an alternate to FaceID when FaceID won't work, like when you're wearing a mask (hopefully by then we'll just be back to thinking about ski masks and scarves in the winter).

    The other is if you want to really heighten your level of security. At least a few years ago, the probability of a false-positive for touchID was something like 1/50,000, and the probability of a false-positive for FaceID was something like 1/1,000,000. The numbers for both are probably better than that by now. If you set your phone to require both to unlock it, you get to multiply those probabilities for each, resulting in an infinitesimally small chance of false positives happening for both and unlocking your phone. Using the above stats, your denominator becomes 50 billion, which is roughly seven times larger than the total human population. This means that it would be, for practical purposes, an impossibility for anyone but the owner of an iPhone to get through both TouchID and FaceID to unlock an iPhone. 


    patchythepiratewatto_cobra
  • Reply 8 of 29
    Still sporting a Touch ID phone. How easy it to use Face ID at payment terminals etc?
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 9 of 29
    loopless said:
    What a waste of effort adding touch ID back in - I haven't missed it one little bit since I 'upgraded' to Face ID.

    I haven't missed it either - because I never downgraded to the useless Face ID.  And I never intend to.
    williamlondon
  • Reply 10 of 29
    lwio said:
    Still sporting a Touch ID phone. How easy it to use Face ID at payment terminals etc?

    It doesn't work with masks.  I strongly recommend continuing to avoid it.
    williamlondon
  • Reply 11 of 29
    wood1208wood1208 Posts: 2,572member
    Hello, Mr. whatever. What happened to your predictions regarding iPhone 13 will connect to low orbit satellite ? You are hit and miss !
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 12 of 29
    I use my iPhone to pay for literally everything I buy.  Resting my thumb on Touch ID is effortless. Face ID requires double clicking the side button and looking at the phone to register it before placing it on the terminal. 

    May not sound a lot, but it’s two steps more than I like and over dozens of occasions in a day, it gets tiresome. (Add to that my side button sometimes sticks or doesn’t click first press.)
    edited September 20 williamlondon
  • Reply 13 of 29
    sdw2001sdw2001 Posts: 17,721member
    darkvader said:
    lwio said:
    Still sporting a Touch ID phone. How easy it to use Face ID at payment terminals etc?

    It doesn't work with masks.  I strongly recommend continuing to avoid it.
    They are working on a way for it to work with masks.  Not that it matters, because masks will be gone in 6 months.  
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 14 of 29
    sdw2001sdw2001 Posts: 17,721member
    Honestly, I don't get the reputation this guy has.  Yes, he's been right about some specific things, but many of his predictions are more general or obvious evolutionary changes.  We've known about in-screen Touch ID for several years now.  So the guy correctly predicts some specs.  Why is that interesting?  His bolder statements like "delaying feature rollout will hurt iPhone sales in 2022 and 2023" are completely unfounded speculation.  
    radarthekatwatto_cobra
  • Reply 15 of 29
    lwio said:
    Still sporting a Touch ID phone. How easy it to use Face ID at payment terminals etc?
    It's a bit annoying, but fine, unless you're wearing a mask (which aren't going away anytime soon -- if you believed them when they said "two weeks to slow the curve," I've got some bad news for you..). For that specific issue the watch is better anyway, just double tap the side button and scan.
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 16 of 29
    To the people who keep saying they don’t understand why anybody wants to “go back” to Touch ID -  the answer is simple - many people like it,  that’s why.  
    williamlondon
  • Reply 17 of 29
    Are there people out there that actually want a folding iPhone? I don’t mean people that would buy one if they were available, because that may or may not include me. I mean people that actively wish that Apple would make one, and are longing for the day that they do. How many of those people are out there?
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 18 of 29
    M68000 said:
    To the people who keep saying they don’t understand why anybody wants to “go back” to Touch ID -  the answer is simple - many people like it,  that’s why.  
    Just like the headphone jack.
  • Reply 19 of 29
    thttht Posts: 4,094member
    Japhey said:
    Are there people out there that actually want a folding iPhone? I don’t mean people that would buy one if they were available, because that may or may not include me. I mean people that actively wish that Apple would make one, and are longing for the day that they do. How many of those people are out there?
    Tech is not out there just yet. I can see myself getting a 2-hinge (tri-fold as it were) as it would be a nice phone and bed video player, book reader combo.

    Eg, when folded up, 6" 2:1 aspect ratio, which is just a little shorter than today's iPhones, and when unfolded, it would be 9.7" 3:2. Problem is that the thickness is pretty darn hard to workaround. You want the folded thickness to be about 0.4" (12mm) or less, about the original iPhone thickness. This means when unfolded, it would be about 0.16" (4mm). Not a lot of room for display and battery.

    If it is thin phone thick, about 0.27" (7mm), that would make for a 0.83" (21mm) thick device when folded. The bulk is really adding up. Also have a mass issue. Thing is going to be about 0.5 lb. Heavy.

    The current issue imo with folding phones is that there isn't a comfortable aspect ratio for either folded or unfolded configurations, robustness aside.
    williamlondonmuthuk_vanalingamwatto_cobra
  • Reply 20 of 29
    tht said:
    Japhey said:
    Are there people out there that actually want a folding iPhone? I don’t mean people that would buy one if they were available, because that may or may not include me. I mean people that actively wish that Apple would make one, and are longing for the day that they do. How many of those people are out there?
    Tech is not out there just yet. I can see myself getting a 2-hinge (tri-fold as it were) as it would be a nice phone and bed video player, book reader combo.

    Eg, when folded up, 6" 2:1 aspect ratio, which is just a little shorter than today's iPhones, and when unfolded, it would be 9.7" 3:2. Problem is that the thickness is pretty darn hard to workaround. You want the folded thickness to be about 0.4" (12mm) or less, about the original iPhone thickness. This means when unfolded, it would be about 0.16" (4mm). Not a lot of room for display and battery.

    If it is thin phone thick, about 0.27" (7mm), that would make for a 0.83" (21mm) thick device when folded. The bulk is really adding up. Also have a mass issue. Thing is going to be about 0.5 lb. Heavy.

    The current issue imo with folding phones is that there isn't a comfortable aspect ratio for either folded or unfolded configurations, robustness aside.
    Also, the radius of the fold point I would assume must be a certain size in order to be able to reliably bend without showing significant disruption at the fold line. I can't imagine there's a material that would ever make this practical. Hope I'm wrong, but it feels like a stretch..
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