Apple explains security & privacy risks of side-loading in detailed new paper

Posted:
in iPhone
Apple has published a new research paper taking a deep dive into some of the security and privacy risks of side-loading, or obtaining apps outside of the App Store.

Credit: Andrew O'Hara, AppleInsider
Credit: Andrew O'Hara, AppleInsider


The whitepaper, "Building a Trust Ecosystem for Millions of Apps," is an update on a previous version released in June. It leaves behind the approach of using fictional characters to explain security threats in favor of a more academic tone.

From the start, the paper takes a hard stance against side-loading, claiming that the practice would "cripple the privacy and security protections that have made iPhone so secure, and expose users to serious security risks."

Apple says that being forced to allow side-loading on iOS would allow harmful apps to proliferate among users, take away user control once apps are already downloaded onto their systems, and mandate removing protections from sensitive areas on an iPhone. The company claims these risks would be present even if side-loading was only available through third-party app stores on a device.

"Users could be forced to sideload an app they need for work or school," Apple writes. "Users also may have no choice other than sideloading an app that they need to connect with family and friends because the app is not made available on the
App Store."

The rest of the paper takes a deep dive into the current mobile threat landscape, using statistics and examples of current spyware that leverage side-loading or tricking users to spread.

Apple gives specific malware examples too, including adware HiddenAds, ransomware CryCryptor, and surveillance app FakeSpy. Notably, those mobile threats are all present on Android, which Apple used as an example of the dangers of allowing side-loading.

The Cupertino tech giant highlights research suggesting that the iPhone is the most secure mobile consumer device. It also details some of the methods that make malware rare on the platform, including the App Review process and an iPhone's built-in layers of protection.
Forcing Apple to support sideloading on iOS through direct downloads or third-party app stores would weaken these layers of security and expose all users to new and serious security risks: It would allow harmful and illegitimate apps to reach users more easily; it would undermine the features that give users control over legitimate apps they download; and it would undermine iPhone on-device protections. Sideloading would be a step backwards for user security and privacy. Supporting sideloading on iOS devices would essentially turn them into "pocket PCs," returning to the days of virus-riddled PCs.
The research paper comes in response to increasing talk of side-loading as a potential remedy for antitrust concerns. Both the U.S. and European Union, for example, are exploring legislation or rules that could force Apple to allow side-loading on its platforms.

Apple has argued against wide adoption of side-loading in the past, including in court during the Epic Games v. Apple trial. Company CEO Tim Cook also spoke out against the practice in the EU earlier in 2021, claiming that it would threaten iPhone security.

Individual users can side-load through Xcode now, but it requires a modicum of technical ability to do so. Enterprise certificates exist as well, but there are restrictions on what it can be used for, what volumes of installs are allowed, and more.

While Android can be configured to allow side-loading, it is not shipped with the feature enabled by default. Both Google and Samsung consider it a security risk.

Compared to previous iterations of its security research, the new white paper is much more in-depth and features expanded information on what it believes are the threats of side-loading. The paper is available to download.

Read on AppleInsider

Comments

  • Reply 1 of 17
    Apple, next please explain the security and privacy risks of allowing a backdoor into people's devices, no matter what form that takes. Thanks.
    rcfamuthuk_vanalingamcuriousrun8watto_cobra
  • Reply 2 of 17
    mobirdmobird Posts: 646member
    Who determines whether an app is "legitimate or illegitimate" and what is considered "legitimate"?
    rcfawilliamlondon
  • Reply 3 of 17
    lkrupplkrupp Posts: 9,557member
    Kinda rings hollow when the Apple II and the Mac have allowed ‘side-loading’ since day one. I think I have come over to the side of those wanting to ‘side-load’. As for those who could be compromised by installing software, make it like the Mac and Gatekeeper. You can install whatever you want but if the software is not signed and verified you need to jump through some hoops to screw yourself. And if you screw yourself, have your bank account emptied, and lose all your personal data, well then, that’s totally on you. And I agree with the idea that the vast majority of iOS users will stick with the App Store. I know I will.

    Secondly, we read all the articles about how leaky Android is regarding security but we don’t see reports of massive compromises of Android user’s. I know a lot of people who use Android phones and not one of them has lamented having their data stolen. Are they more careful than iOS users?

    Apple has used the security and privacy issue as one of the pillars of its marketing campaigns. It’s a pillar that’s a little unstable these days.
    edited October 13 gatorguyrcfamuthuk_vanalingamwilliamlondonavon b7
  • Reply 4 of 17
    'Side loading' also known, prior to 2007, as installing an application on your computer.  The key phrase here being 'your computer'.  Who does Apple think they are to deny people the right to install any application they want on THEIR iPhone?  Apple's entire case falls apart when you realize the Macintosh can still 'side load' applications to this day.  Right-click, open.  Annoyed by that?  Disable Gatekeeper completely with a command in the Terminal.  Why does this 'side loading' persist on the Macintosh? Simple, their customers would not tolerate such computer tyranny. Remember, Gatekeeper was added in to the Macintosh in Snow Leopard. iPhone customers should start to speak up about Apple's heavy handedness on their iPhones.  The iPhone's walled garden should be optional just like it is on the Macintosh.  Heck, most times I'd choose to stay in the walled garden for security, but when Apple gets heavy handed, like they are today with their outrageous censorship on the App Store and Podcasts, we need an opt out.

    Bottom-line, this is about maintaining 30% profit on apps and control of people's devices.  It is as simple as that.
    rcfamuthuk_vanalingamwilliamlondon
  • Reply 5 of 17
    rcfarcfa Posts: 1,113member
    Apple can’t have it both ways:

    1) For legitimate reasons they want to control what apps are associated with an Apple branded AppStore, as they affect the Apple brand. 
    OK, so then, since Apple has no right to act as a private industry censorship authority, they must allow users to install what Apple considered unsavory apps some other way on the devices the bought and own.

    OR

    2) Apple wants to control privacy and security, then it must allow for more fine-grained access to resources (e.g. access to MAC addresses if the user confirms and the app can demonstrate a legitimate use during the application process) and permit all apps to be listed in their AppStore.

    Also, there are some restrictions, like the ban on emulators, which in the context of sandboxed apps makes no sense. If someone ports e.g. Previous to iPadOS allowing legacy NeXT apps to run within a sandboxed emulator, exactly what are privacy implications supposed to be?

    As it stands, sideloading aka installing apps, should always be possible; Apple can warn against the potential risks, but the decision must remain the users’.

    I’m glad Apple doesn’t manufacture cutlery: it would be spoons only, because knives are dangerously sharp, and forks and chopsticks might get someone’s eyes poked… 
    williamlondonlibertymatterselijahg
  • Reply 6 of 17
    'Side loading' also known, prior to 2007, as installing an application on your computer.  The key phrase here being 'your computer'.  Who does Apple think they are to deny people the right to install any application they want on THEIR iPhone?  Apple's entire case falls apart when you realize the Macintosh can still 'side load' applications to this day.  Right-click, open.  Annoyed by that?  Disable Gatekeeper completely with a command in the Terminal.  Why does this 'side loading' persist on the Macintosh? Simple, their customers would not tolerate such computer tyranny. Remember, Gatekeeper was added in to the Macintosh in Snow Leopard. iPhone customers should start to speak up about Apple's heavy handedness on their iPhones.  The iPhone's walled garden should be optional just like it is on the Macintosh.  Heck, most times I'd choose to stay in the walled garden for security, but when Apple gets heavy handed, like they are today with their outrageous censorship on the App Store and Podcasts, we need an opt out.

    Bottom-line, this is about maintaining 30% profit on apps and control of people's devices.  It is as simple as that.
    Apps that sell physical goods, 0% most streaming apps pay 0% as they do not offer IAP and make you sign up and pay outside the store. You can as a developer use this approach, granted a bit cumbersome, but you get a free hosting and updated platform for free (99$ per year developer contract). You are a digital content provider, after year one your IAP drops to 15%. You are a small developer you pay 15% Today the 30% is exception not the rule.

    Gaming consoles (which today offer more than gaming, 30% and closed as well) ...

    Computers you say well yeah I'll trust my computer with my personal and financial data, NOT, for the reason it's an open door, though I'm not easily to fool, I;'m not so sure about my family members ...
    Apple needs to be paid for the constant free updates/ hosting / reimbursement if for example you get tricked into IAP scams etc ... 

    Last but not least, not happy, there is choice out there, so buy something else ,,,, I do not want to manage another set of stores like on Windows, what a Fing nightmare that has become, hence the reason I'm switching to an AppleSilicon Mac soon.



     
    williamlondonwatto_cobra
  • Reply 7 of 17
    GeorgeBMacGeorgeBMac Posts: 10,490member
    lkrupp said:
    Kinda rings hollow when the Apple II and the Mac have allowed ‘side-loading’ since day one. I think I have come over to the side of those wanting to ‘side-load’. As for those who could be compromised by installing software, make it like the Mac and Gatekeeper. You can install whatever you want but if the software is not signed and verified you need to jump through some hoops to screw yourself. And if you screw yourself, have your bank account emptied, and lose all your personal data, well then, that’s totally on you. And I agree with the idea that the vast majority of iOS users will stick with the App Store. I know I will.

    Secondly, we read all the articles about how leaky Android is regarding security but we don’t see reports of massive compromises of Android user’s. I know a lot of people who use Android phones and not one of them has lamented having their data stolen. Are they more careful than iOS users?

    Apple has used the security and privacy issue as one of the pillars of its marketing campaigns. It’s a pillar that’s a little unstable these days.

    1)  Apple has already admitted that Mac security is not as robust as that of iPhone
    2)  The iPhone tends to hold far more sensitive user data than do Macs.
    3)  The iPhone tends to be more mobile and thus more vulnerable to loss, theft and WiFi hacking.

    The security requirements of the two are not the same and should not be equated.
    Plus, all of that simply ignores the history of the two:  The Mac was created back when security & privacy and hacking were not such critical issues.   Actually, they weren't issues at all.

    The security requirements of the two should not be equated.
    ericthehalfbeeFileMakerFellerwatto_cobrajony0
  • Reply 8 of 17
    GeorgeBMacGeorgeBMac Posts: 10,490member
    Anybody who does not understand the security risks of open platforms versus those in a walled garden is not qualified to participate in the discussion.

    Some though say:   Nobody should care about security because "freedom".
    ... The truth is:  maybe they don't -- but the broad majority of Apple customers do care.
    ....  The concerns of the vocal minority should not override those of the far quieter majority.
    Detnatorwatto_cobrajony0
  • Reply 9 of 17
    gatorguygatorguy Posts: 23,252member
    Anybody who does not understand the security risks of open platforms versus those in a walled garden is not qualified to participate in the discussion.


    These guys understand it:

    From Wired and written by security researchers: “Android security is improving with every new release of the OS thanks to the security teams of Google and Samsung, so it became very hard and time-consuming to develop full chains of exploits for Android and it’s even harder to develop zero-click exploits not requiring any user interaction.” But on the other hand, he writes, “During the last few months, we have observed an increase in the number of iOS exploits, mostly Safari and iMessage chains, being developed and sold by researchers from all around the world. The zero-day market is so flooded by iOS exploits that we’ve recently started refusing some of them.”

    Maor Shwartz, an independent vulnerability researcher who also spoke to Wired, agreed. He says that the majority of the targets are Android users, but the number of vulnerabilities is lower because a lot of those vulnerabilities have been patched. “Every researcher I’ve talked to, I’ve told them, if you want to make money, go focus on Android,” said Shwartz.

    Shwartz also says that the reason Android vulnerabilities are more valued is because it’s harder to find a browser vulnerability in Chrome than Safari. That, combined with the difficulty of finding something called a “local privilege escalation exploit, makes Android a difficult target. Previously, this exploit was only hard to find in iOS, but recent security improvements have made it rare in Android as well.

    Over the years, Google has also been silently strengthening Android by adding new file-based encryptions, modifying what resources an app can access and how, and adding mitigations to make hacking harder even with zero-day exploits. If you’re interested in learning more about this, watch Android’s principal software engineer, Narayan Kamath, go over the privacy features of the upcoming Android 11 in this video. Ironically, Shwartz credits these improvements to Android’s open source approach. For many years, the better security in Apple devices was attributed to its closed nature.

    edited October 13 ctt_zhmuthuk_vanalingamelijahg
  • Reply 10 of 17
    My two —usually useless— comments:

    1— ASK THE CUSTOMERS! We paid around $1,000- for an iPhone because it gives us ‘security and privacy.’
    The people that ask for side loading are: politician looking for votes; developers trying to avoid paying for Apple's IP; sellers and business looking to get into the ‘golden garden’ without paying anything; ad seller looking to track users…

    The FCA, FCC, EU, et als should do a poll: The telcos have the numbers, ask users —by OS— what they want!

    2— Apple could sell a ‘Yellow iPhone’ —as the Product RED—. It must be clearly distinguished as what it is: a side-loading device… Apple will take no responsability in anything that happens with the device —other that physical, but many users will break it when everything is stollen from them!—.

    ASK THE CUSTOMERS! THEY PUT THEIR MONEY WHERE THEIR HEART IS!
    GeorgeBMacDetnatorwatto_cobrajony0
  • Reply 11 of 17
    These issues have a simple solution: If the users chooses to enable side loading they lose certain iOS features like access to iCloud or the App Store. A user must first reset and wipe their iPhones of all existing apps and data before it can be put into open or side loading mode. In that mode users can do all kinds of potentially dangerous things with the devices they own including installing third party app stores and side loading potentially dangerous apps. In this open mode, iOS would work just like MacOS and Windows and every other computer going back to the days of the Apple II which all allowed users to load any app they desired. Obviously this is not the mode you would want to use with your main iPhone but that one you put in the draw last year would be perfect.
    edited October 13
  • Reply 12 of 17
    gatorguy said:
    Anybody who does not understand the security risks of open platforms versus those in a walled garden is not qualified to participate in the discussion.


    These guys understand it:

    From Wired and written by security researchers: “Android security is improving with every new release of the OS thanks to the security teams of Google and Samsung, so it became very hard and time-consuming to develop full chains of exploits for Android and it’s even harder to develop zero-click exploits not requiring any user interaction.” But on the other hand, he writes, “During the last few months, we have observed an increase in the number of iOS exploits, mostly Safari and iMessage chains, being developed and sold by researchers from all around the world. The zero-day market is so flooded by iOS exploits that we’ve recently started refusing some of them.”

    Maor Shwartz, an independent vulnerability researcher who also spoke to Wired, agreed. He says that the majority of the targets are Android users, but the number of vulnerabilities is lower because a lot of those vulnerabilities have been patched. “Every researcher I’ve talked to, I’ve told them, if you want to make money, go focus on Android,” said Shwartz.

    Shwartz also says that the reason Android vulnerabilities are more valued is because it’s harder to find a browser vulnerability in Chrome than Safari. That, combined with the difficulty of finding something called a “local privilege escalation exploit, makes Android a difficult target. Previously, this exploit was only hard to find in iOS, but recent security improvements have made it rare in Android as well.

    Over the years, Google has also been silently strengthening Android by adding new file-based encryptions, modifying what resources an app can access and how, and adding mitigations to make hacking harder even with zero-day exploits. If you’re interested in learning more about this, watch Android’s principal software engineer, Narayan Kamath, go over the privacy features of the upcoming Android 11 in this video. Ironically, Shwartz credits these improvements to Android’s open source approach. For many years, the better security in Apple devices was attributed to its closed nature.


    You have the same MO as a conspiracy theorist (as I’ve pointed out to you before).

    Instead of explaining something yourself you are only capable of telling others to “go read this” or “go watch that”. It’s the hallmark of someone who doesn’t know anything about the topic at hand, but has a strong opinion on it anyway. You lack the ability to formulate your own argument so you let others speak for you. As long as what they say aligns with your beliefs.

    You are the Apple/Google tech equivalent of a fiat-Earther.
    williamlondonGeorgeBMacwatto_cobra
  • Reply 13 of 17
    gatorguygatorguy Posts: 23,252member
    gatorguy said:
    Anybody who does not understand the security risks of open platforms versus those in a walled garden is not qualified to participate in the discussion.


    These guys understand it:

    From Wired and written by security researchers: “Android security is improving with every new release of the OS thanks to the security teams of Google and Samsung, so it became very hard and time-consuming to develop full chains of exploits for Android and it’s even harder to develop zero-click exploits not requiring any user interaction.” But on the other hand, he writes, “During the last few months, we have observed an increase in the number of iOS exploits, mostly Safari and iMessage chains, being developed and sold by researchers from all around the world. The zero-day market is so flooded by iOS exploits that we’ve recently started refusing some of them.”

    Maor Shwartz, an independent vulnerability researcher who also spoke to Wired, agreed. He says that the majority of the targets are Android users, but the number of vulnerabilities is lower because a lot of those vulnerabilities have been patched. “Every researcher I’ve talked to, I’ve told them, if you want to make money, go focus on Android,” said Shwartz.

    Shwartz also says that the reason Android vulnerabilities are more valued is because it’s harder to find a browser vulnerability in Chrome than Safari. That, combined with the difficulty of finding something called a “local privilege escalation exploit, makes Android a difficult target. Previously, this exploit was only hard to find in iOS, but recent security improvements have made it rare in Android as well.

    Over the years, Google has also been silently strengthening Android by adding new file-based encryptions, modifying what resources an app can access and how, and adding mitigations to make hacking harder even with zero-day exploits. If you’re interested in learning more about this, watch Android’s principal software engineer, Narayan Kamath, go over the privacy features of the upcoming Android 11 in this video. Ironically, Shwartz credits these improvements to Android’s open source approach. For many years, the better security in Apple devices was attributed to its closed nature.


    You have the same MO as a conspiracy theorist (as I’ve pointed out to you before).

    Instead of explaining something yourself you are only capable of telling others to “go read this” or “go watch that”. It’s the hallmark of someone who doesn’t know anything about the topic at hand, but has a strong opinion on it anyway. You lack the ability to formulate your own argument so you let others speak for you. As long as what they say aligns with your beliefs.

    You are the Apple/Google tech equivalent of a fiat-Earther.
    Eric, are you credentialed in the field of security research? Heck I stayed at a Holiday Inn Express once, making me as qualified as you AFAIK. That's why I trust professionals skilled in the field for their explanations and not EricTheHalfBee. You should have just as high a standard and not rely on my expertise in it. Trust the pros. 
    muthuk_vanalingamelijahgjony0
  • Reply 14 of 17
    mattinozmattinoz Posts: 1,658member
    lkrupp said:
    Kinda rings hollow when the Apple II and the Mac have allowed ‘side-loading’ since day one. I think I have come over to the side of those wanting to ‘side-load’. As for those who could be compromised by installing software, make it like the Mac and Gatekeeper. You can install whatever you want but if the software is not signed and verified you need to jump through some hoops to screw yourself. And if you screw yourself, have your bank account emptied, and lose all your personal data, well then, that’s totally on you. And I agree with the idea that the vast majority of iOS users will stick with the App Store. I know I will.

    Secondly, we read all the articles about how leaky Android is regarding security but we don’t see reports of massive compromises of Android user’s. I know a lot of people who use Android phones and not one of them has lamented having their data stolen. Are they more careful than iOS users?

    Apple has used the security and privacy issue as one of the pillars of its marketing campaigns. It’s a pillar that’s a little unstable these days.
    When both those system did it, it was just called loading and you had to physically remove the 'App' from the machine to run another. 
    Then again the Commodore 64 had side loading but mostly because it didn't have enough space on the top of the machine so the drive/tape deck sat behind and was easier to get to if you put the door to the side. 

    iOS don't even have tape drives to side load from. ;-)


    elijahgGeorgeBMacwatto_cobra
  • Reply 15 of 17
    You have the legal right to modify the device you own as you see fit. As a telecommunications device, modifying an iPhone makes you responsible for complying with all the relevant legislation for operating such a device, including the EM radiation profile, ability to operate in an emergency, and a host of other factors that are usually overlooked by those without experience in the field. Battery management is also handled by software, and iPhone batteries store enough energy to do some serious damage if it is released all at once.

    So, what's the risk when changing the OS on the device? For one thing, if you want to make "minimal" changes by keeping most of the code in place and "just" allowing side-loading, you're going to have to contend with Apple's copyright on iOS - you might be able to get away with making changes for personal use, but sharing that information (even for free) is opening you up to significant legal risk and most individuals don't have the resources to cope with that. You can put a modified version of Android on there (AOSP, anyway), but if you want Android on a phone it's a heckuva lot easier to just buy an Android phone.

    What it all boils down to is that the risks and effort for an individual become much too high to make changes to the phone, even though the individual has the right to do so. Forming a community of like-minded individuals to share the effort doesn't actually reduce the legal risk by much. And this is why everyone who wants to side-load is clamouring for Apple to make the required changes - but Apple has financial incentives to not do it, and demonstrable benefits to the user base from not doing it.

    So the complainers voice their frustrations online, discover that they're a minority, and try to use that minority status as influence with government regulators in that hope that Apple can be forced into spending millions of dollars to satisfy their whims. Even when Apple has a system to allow the loading of arbitrary code (but you need a free developer account, and you have to reload the software every seven days). Even when Apple has a system to allow the loading of precompiled apps (but you need to be registered with their Enterprise system so you can deploy those apps to devices with a specified profile).

    No, no, these people think Apple should open up everything on the iPhone even if that has a significantly negative impact on hundreds of millions of people around the world because their own personal desires are not being met.

    You know what? Western society has a mechanism for dealing with situations like this - it's called the free market. If you think it's so important to have these capabilities, go form a company, gather investors, and build your own damn phone. Discover how many people will give you money for your idea and implementation, and live with the consequences. Apple did it. You can too.
    GeorgeBMacDetnatorwatto_cobra
  • Reply 16 of 17
    davidwdavidw Posts: 1,346member
    lkrupp said:
    Kinda rings hollow when the Apple II and the Mac have allowed ‘side-loading’ since day one. I think I have come over to the side of those wanting to ‘side-load’. As for those who could be compromised by installing software, make it like the Mac and Gatekeeper. You can install whatever you want but if the software is not signed and verified you need to jump through some hoops to screw yourself. And if you screw yourself, have your bank account emptied, and lose all your personal data, well then, that’s totally on you. And I agree with the idea that the vast majority of iOS users will stick with the App Store. I know I will.

    Secondly, we read all the articles about how leaky Android is regarding security but we don’t see reports of massive compromises of Android user’s. I know a lot of people who use Android phones and not one of them has lamented having their data stolen. Are they more careful than iOS users?

    Apple has used the security and privacy issue as one of the pillars of its marketing campaigns. It’s a pillar that’s a little unstable these days.
    The better security and privacy offered by a Mac is a goal that PC venders should to strive for. Apple should strive for better security and privacy, than a Mac. 

    Very few users, whether on iOS or Android, wants to side load. They would rather get their apps from the Apple App Store or Google Play Store and pay for it using the account they already have with Apple or Google. And for most, they will not take the extra few steps to side load an app, even if that app is not available in the app store.

    The people that mainly wants side loading are the developers that wants to avoid paying Apple or Google the commission. Or are offering apps that do not meet the security and privacy standards, to be in Apple or Google app stores. These are the people that are crying the loudest about not being able to side load on iOS devices.

    Android can said to be as secure as iOS (for sure Gatorguy would say this) but Google has to work hard at it. Very hard. And even Google admits that preventing side loading is the better way to make Android devices more secure. They recommend to their users needing the highest security, to enroll in their Advance Protection Program, which prevents side loading apps over the internet, on their devices.

    >This program was devised to offer extra protection for Google accounts owned by people who may be prominent targets of malware attacks and phishing scams, such as business leaders, political campaign teams, activists, journalists and so on. < 

    https://www.sammobile.com/news/google-new-advanced-protection-security-features-sideloading/ ;  

    One thing for sure, with iOS devices, one don't have to worry about their old not so tech savvy parents or grandparents or young kids being scammed into loading a malicious app by way of an email link. Even Mac users can and have been known to, fall for that.
    FileMakerFellerDetnatorwatto_cobra
  • Reply 17 of 17
    davidwdavidw Posts: 1,346member

    These issues have a simple solution: If the users chooses to enable side loading they lose certain iOS features like access to iCloud or the App Store. A user must first reset and wipe their iPhones of all existing apps and data before it can be put into open or side loading mode. In that mode users can do all kinds of potentially dangerous things with the devices they own including installing third party app stores and side loading potentially dangerous apps. In this open mode, iOS would work just like MacOS and Windows and every other computer going back to the days of the Apple II which all allowed users to load any app they desired. Obviously this is not the mode you would want to use with your main iPhone but that one you put in the draw last year would be perfect.
    Any extra steps required or features removed, in order to side load, will be seen as Apple using the dominate power they have with their App Store, to be anti-completive. And the developers will sue.

    Epic lawsuit against Google includes a claim that Google is behaving like an illegal monopolist with their Google Play Store, even though Android allows side loading and third party app stores. That's because Google puts up barriers to side loading. When side loading on Android, Google puts up various warnings, alerting the user to the danger of side loading. (Plus a few extra steps that might be scary or difficult to understand for some.) Even if one is side loading from a trusted site like Epic's website. Epic claims that this is anti-completive by discouraging users from side loading and puts developers that don't want to use the Google Play Store, at a disadvantage.

    Developers would never allow Apple to get away with (specially in the EU) having iOS users that wants to side load apps, (even if it's just one app), give up some of the features in their devices, features that iOS users that will never side load apps on to their devices, gets to keep and use. if only a small percentage of iOS users would even consider side loading and put their devices in "side loading mode", then developers would lose easy access all the other iOS users not in "side loading mode". The big developers will not stand for this and won't quit crying about the users rights to side load until is just as easy and convenient to side load an app, as it is to load an app from the App Store. And to them, it's not about the rights of iOS users, but about their "rights" to not have to pay Apple a commission for making money using Apple IP.   
    GeorgeBMacFileMakerFellerwatto_cobra
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