Tim Cook 'feels good' about Apple's Self Service Repair initiative

Posted:
in iPhone edited November 24
Apple CEO Tim Cook is optimistic about the upcoming Self Service Repair program, and that the program is ideal for technicians and enthusiasts "trained to do this."




Apple's Self Service Repair program, which will roll out in 2022, will provide users with the opportunity to buy genuine Apple parts and tools for common iPhone 12 and iPhone 13 repairs. In an interview during the opening of the relocated The Grove Apple Store in Los Angeles, CEO Tim Cook offered some observations about the initiative, as well as other areas.

"We realize that there were some people who wanted to do this, and that are trained to do this," said Cook to KTLA. "They're the Popular Mechanics crowd if you will, which I love and have been focussed on my entire life."

Cook claims it "feels good to put the manuals out there and get the parts out there that enables people to do this," but adds that there's always the Apple Store for those not comfortable with performing their own repairs. "If you're a technician, then have at it," said the CEO.

On what Cook is most excited about for the incoming holiday season, he pointed out Apple had the "best product lineup" ever, and that he didn't have one specific favorite thing. "They're all my favorites, it's like asking you who your favorite child is."





When asked how people's relationship with technology has changed due to the pandemic, Cook believes it has "become much more important to us in getting along with our daily lives. It enabled us to stay connected to each other, connected to our work as well." Cook is optimistic that COVID-19 is "seeing its last days," but after, society will be in a "hybrid mode" that will take lessons learned from remote work.

Cook, as usual, stayed quiet about what Apple has coming up next, but admitted the company is "very focused on augmented reality, very focused on artificial intelligence, very focused on autonomy, focused on all of these things that are core technologies."

Read on AppleInsider
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Comments

  • Reply 1 of 24
    ...this from the CEO at the helm of moving so much 'onboard' including T2 storage controllers...?  Really...?
    I understood shareholder activism pushed Apple to this shift...?  How much of this is simply the latest 'spin'...?

    I've upgraded (and downgraded for repurposing) every mac I've ever owned...

    ...perhaps the web too may again be 'for the rest of us': www.forbes.com/sites/forbestechcouncil/2020/01/06/what-is-web-3-0/
    edited November 24 elijahgwilliamlondon
  • Reply 2 of 24
    BeatsBeats Posts: 2,642member
    A bunch of morons are gonna complain to Apple for breaking their own stuff during self-repair.
    mwhitelkruppwilliamlondonMisterKitmaximara
  • Reply 3 of 24
    elijahgelijahg Posts: 2,506member
    Beats said:
    A bunch of morons are gonna complain to Apple for breaking their own stuff during self-repair.
    Yeah! Just like they do for cars, TVs, dishwashers, washing machines, etc, etc. Oh except they don't.

    You're butthurt because Apple has implemented a policy you vehemently argued they never would. Get over it.
    edited November 24 beowulfschmidtMplsPmuthuk_vanalingamreubsCloudTalkincuriousrun8
  • Reply 4 of 24
    Of course he feels good about it.  Either people will use the service, and Apple will make money, or they won't, and Apple will make money.  All that in addition to the PR bump.

    Win/win/win.
    MplsPwilliamlondonmuthuk_vanalingam
  • Reply 5 of 24
    avon b7avon b7 Posts: 5,959member
    Sometimes it is better for him not to say anything. This is one of those moments. When spin smells to much like spin it loses value fast. 

    The move itself is a good move. Now the best move would be to design for repair and make them easier to carry out.




    elijahgmuthuk_vanalingamMplsP
  • Reply 6 of 24
    DuhSesameDuhSesame Posts: 1,133member
    ...this from the CEO at the helm of moving so much 'onboard' including T2 storage controllers...?  Really...?
    I understood shareholder activism pushed Apple to this shift...?
    How much of this is simply the latest 'spin'...?
    If your on-board solution can provide something better, by all means do it.
    mwhitewatto_cobra
  • Reply 7 of 24
    Of course he feels good about it.  Either people will use the service, and Apple will make money, or they won't, and Apple will make money.  All that in addition to the PR bump.

    Win/win/win.
    Yeah, not like they're losing anything.

    Also, most of the "unrepairable design flaw" can be solved by pull tabs, slots won't necessary make it any better, besides commentaries.
    watto_cobrabeowulfschmidt
  • Reply 8 of 24
    Does he feel as good as James Brown did in the Living in America video?
    king editor the gratewatto_cobra
  • Reply 9 of 24
    DuhSesame said:
    ...this from the CEO at the helm of moving so much 'onboard' including T2 storage controllers...?  Really...?
    I understood shareholder activism pushed Apple to this shift...?
    How much of this is simply the latest 'spin'...?
    If your on-board solution can provide something better, by all means do it.
    ...since the article is about repairability and perhaps flexibility one might need to define better... PCIe 4 blades @ 7+GB/s seem available now, and a second slot might allow RAID upgrades for those whose brains can work that quickly... : )
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 10 of 24
    elijahg said:
    Beats said:
    A bunch of morons are gonna complain to Apple for breaking their own stuff during self-repair.
    Yeah! Just like they do for cars, TVs, dishwashers, washing machines, etc, etc. Oh except they don't. .
    Mainly because when any of those go walkabout it is generally time to replace the device.  Who here know what CPU their cars, TVs, dishwashers, washing machines, even use?  

    Heck, issues about not being able to fix your own car has been a problem going back to the 1990s thanks to the on board computer.  In fact, in some cases just replacing the battery can "lock you out of the car".  

    If that is not enough the AAA mechanic I used wouldn't even try to work on a certain make of car because the system to tell them what was actually wrong (rather than blinding replacing parts) cost $100,000 in 2010.  Who knows what it costs now.  

    My father worked on cars all his adult life and even replaced an engine block.  Then we gut my grandfather's Tarsus (late 1980s) and when it had a problem he opened the hood took one look and called AAA to have them tow to a garage to be fixed. 30 years working on cars and he knew he didn't have the skill to work on that car.

    Never mind you can't repair many AC systems in older cars as the AC system has to be totally retrofitted for the new 
    coolants.

    It is like the App Store bills everybody made a noise about.  They either spectacularly failed when they got to they go to state senate (South Dakota); gets pulled because there weren't enough votes and the state senate didn't want to look like fools (Arizona), or have been in committee so long if they are dead they are on life support.

    Apple, however, went on the record before Congress In November 2019, telling to a House Judiciary Committee probe that it actually lost money on repair services: “For each year since 2009, the costs of providing repair services has exceeded the revenue generated by repairs.” - ‘Right to repair’ law may run into the changing definition of ‘ownership’

    "It’s a noble idea, but one that has significant limitations, and it’s not just economics,” O’Donnell said of the right-to-repair argument, noting that the technical complexity of modern-day products pose a challenge to the concept. As an example, O’Donnell said that if the Intel Corp.CPU in your computer gets fried, the component is so complicated that there’s no point of even trying to repair it.

    You’re not going to fix that, Intel can’t even fix that,” O’Donnell said “You have to pop it apart and go inside. It’s just not something that’s feasible to do, no matter how much you want to do it, no matter how much the government says you should do it, it’s just not possible, and other products like an iPhone have gotten to that same level of complexity.” - ‘Right to repair’ law may run into the changing definition of ‘ownership’

    What the Right To Repair Movement Gets Wrong goes in the reality of the things we buy not some idealistic claptrap by a group who the majority likely won't have the skills needed to do their own self repair.
    edited November 24 williamlondonwatto_cobra
  • Reply 11 of 24
    avon b7 said:
    Sometimes it is better for him not to say anything. This is one of those moments. When spin smells too much like spin it loses value fast. 

    The move itself is a good move. Now the best move would be to design for repair and make them easier to carry out.




    Well said. I was thinking along those lines, but couldn't find the right words to express it.
    williamlondonelijahg
  • Reply 12 of 24
    DuhSesameDuhSesame Posts: 1,133member
    DuhSesame said:
    ...this from the CEO at the helm of moving so much 'onboard' including T2 storage controllers...?  Really...?
    I understood shareholder activism pushed Apple to this shift...?
    How much of this is simply the latest 'spin'...?
    If your on-board solution can provide something better, by all means do it.
    ...since the article is about repairability and perhaps flexibility one might need to define better... PCIe 4 blades @ 7+GB/s seem available now, and a second slot might allow RAID upgrades for those whose brains can work that quickly... : )
    I have no doubt they could, even without slots.  Question is whether it's worth it.  x8 controllers need active cooling to begin with, means a lot more power is needed.
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 13 of 24
    Beats said:
    A bunch of morons are gonna complain to Apple for breaking their own stuff during self-repair.

    Can't imagine they'll receive any more complaints than they currently do. Sounds like you're just triggered because you don't agree with this decision, based on your past posts. Move on. Find something worthy of being butthurt about and be productive in a space that actually matters. I.e., sustainability, climate change etc.

    Furthermore, I've always found it curious how some people can be so defensive on behalf of an enormous multinational that can afford to implement schemes like this. Is your bank account affected? Nah. Consumers own the products that they purchase off companies like Apple, regardless of what the T&Cs say. Consumers therefore should be able to do what ever they want with them.
    elijahgmuthuk_vanalingamwilliamlondonMplsPcuriousrun8
  • Reply 14 of 24
    XedXed Posts: 1,111member
    avon b7 said:
    Sometimes it is better for him not to say anything. This is one of those moments. When spin smells to much like spin it loses value fast. 

    The move itself is a good move. Now the best move would be to design for repair and make them easier to carry out.
    How is it spin? You are an Android shill but you are still smart enough to understand that Cook makes moves that he believes will benefit Apple, specifically Apple’s share price. If you think Cook was not part of this decision or that he failed understand the forces at play determine what was the best course of action for Apple then you really don’t understand why Apple is worth $2.5 trillion nor why it took in nearly $400 billion in revenue for 2021.
    williamlondonSoliwatto_cobra
  • Reply 15 of 24
    Xed said:
    avon b7 said:
    Sometimes it is better for him not to say anything. This is one of those moments. When spin smells to much like spin it loses value fast. 

    The move itself is a good move. Now the best move would be to design for repair and make them easier to carry out.
    How is it spin? You are an Android shill but you are still smart enough to understand that Cook makes moves that he believes will benefit Apple, specifically Apple’s share price. If you think Cook was not part of this decision or that he failed understand the forces at play determine what was the best course of action for Apple then you really don’t understand why Apple is worth $2.5 trillion nor why it took in nearly $400 billion in revenue for 2021.
    Given designs are generally done two to three years in advance the shift in the iPhones had to have been made a while ago.  I think Apple itself was likely having issues repairing the ultra thin designs that the Steve Jobs-Jony Ive era produced.  The MacBooks appear to be getting thicker as will the iPhones.
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 16 of 24
    avon b7avon b7 Posts: 5,959member
    Xed said:
    avon b7 said:
    Sometimes it is better for him not to say anything. This is one of those moments. When spin smells to much like spin it loses value fast. 

    The move itself is a good move. Now the best move would be to design for repair and make them easier to carry out.
    How is it spin? You are an Android shill but you are still smart enough to understand that Cook makes moves that he believes will benefit Apple, specifically Apple’s share price. If you think Cook was not part of this decision or that he failed understand the forces at play determine what was the best course of action for Apple then you really don’t understand why Apple is worth $2.5 trillion nor why it took in nearly $400 billion in revenue for 2021.
    Apple has spent millions on lobbying against right to repair in general and made devices progressively harder to repair. Sometimes requiring non faulty or damaged parts to be replaced as part of a repair. It hasn't been able to guarantee its own staff won't damage a device on taking it apart. Case in point when I took an iPhone in for a battery replacement, I was required to sign a form accepting that the technician could break the device just by trying to get into it and in such case they would hand it back damaged or offer me a refurbished unit at a price I had to accept before handing the device over. This is because the devices are not designed for repair. They are geared for replacement.

    In all these years Apple has done little to nothing to give users options for self repair. 

    Now we get a surprise about turn in tactics and I'm sure it is because Apple sees itself under growing scrutiny and needs a few bones to throw out.

    Good moves, on the face of it but in no way in line with their previous practices. 

    Of course, the decision needs to be 'sold' (that's understandable from a marketing and PR perspective) but you can go too far. 

    Tim is spinning this as Apple doing good and helping users, leading us to believe they always had users front and foremost for repair. That isn't the case. Never has been. Even years ago a Scandinavian consumer body took Apple to task demonstrating a fault that Apple denied existed. Apple is always front and foremost. Fast forward and we have the question about that short screen connector in laptops which Apple denied is a problem in spite of making it longer in newer designs. 

    Like I said, when spin goes to far, it's better not to say anything and let commentators do the selling. So far, this move seems to have been well accepted. The devil will be in the details but on face value it is a move in the right direction. Just don't ask me to believe Apple decided to do this from internal will. This, IMO, is a direct result of external pressures. 

    The EU does not impose change without consultation. Apple has participated in discussions and knows what's likely coming down the pipe. We will surely see more efforts over the coming years to reverse current tactics on design and repair. 

    We can expect a lot more spin as Apple details its changes as 'voluntary' before directives come into effect. 


    edited November 26 muthuk_vanalingamMplsPelijahg
  • Reply 17 of 24
    XedXed Posts: 1,111member
    maximara said:
    Xed said:
    avon b7 said:
    Sometimes it is better for him not to say anything. This is one of those moments. When spin smells to much like spin it loses value fast. 

    The move itself is a good move. Now the best move would be to design for repair and make them easier to carry out.
    How is it spin? You are an Android shill but you are still smart enough to understand that Cook makes moves that he believes will benefit Apple, specifically Apple’s share price. If you think Cook was not part of this decision or that he failed understand the forces at play determine what was the best course of action for Apple then you really don’t understand why Apple is worth $2.5 trillion nor why it took in nearly $400 billion in revenue for 2021.
    Given designs are generally done two to three years in advance the shift in the iPhones had to have been made a while ago.  I think Apple itself was likely having issues repairing the ultra thin designs that the Steve Jobs-Jony Ive era produced.  The MacBooks appear to be getting thicker as will the iPhones.
    And? Are you not familiar with Apple not announcing changes until they're nearly ready to go?

    But, no, the time frame for designing the architecture of a new iPhone is not the same as setting up logistics for selling components, tools, and instructions to 3rd-parties.
    Soliwatto_cobra
  • Reply 18 of 24
    XedXed Posts: 1,111member
    avon b7 said:
    Xed said:
    avon b7 said:
    Sometimes it is better for him not to say anything. This is one of those moments. When spin smells to much like spin it loses value fast. 

    The move itself is a good move. Now the best move would be to design for repair and make them easier to carry out.
    How is it spin? You are an Android shill but you are still smart enough to understand that Cook makes moves that he believes will benefit Apple, specifically Apple’s share price. If you think Cook was not part of this decision or that he failed understand the forces at play determine what was the best course of action for Apple then you really don’t understand why Apple is worth $2.5 trillion nor why it took in nearly $400 billion in revenue for 2021.
    Apple has spent millions on lobbying against right to repair in general and made devices progressively harder to repair. Sometimes requiring non faulty or damaged parts to be replaced as part of a repair. It hasn't been able to guarantee its own staff won't damage a device on taking it apart. Case in point when I took an iPhone in for a battery replacement, I was required to sign a form accepting that the technician could break the device just by trying to get into it and in such case they would hand it back damaged or offer me a refurbished unit at a price I had to accept before handing the device over. This is because the devices are not designed for repair. They are geared for replacement.

    In all these years Apple has done little to nothing to give users options for self repair. 

    Now we get a surprise about turn in tactics and I'm sure it is because Apple sees itself under growing scrutiny and needs a few bones to throw out.

    Good moves, on the face of it but in no way in line with their previous practices. 

    Of course, the decision needs to be 'sold' (that's understandable from a marketing and PR perspective) but you can go too far. 

    Tim is spinning this as Apple doing good and helping users, leading us to believe they always had users front and foremost for repair. That isn't the case. Never has been. Even years ago a Scandinavian consumer body took Apple to task demonstrating a fault that Apple denied existed. Apple is always front and foremost. Fast forward and we have the question about that short screen connector in laptops which Apple denied is a problem in spite of making it longer in newer designs. 

    Like I said, when spin goes to far, it's better not to say anything and let commentators do the selling. So far, this move seems to have been well accepted. The devil will be in the details but on face value it is a move in the right direction. Just don't ask me to believe Apple decided to do this from internal will. This, IMO, is a direct result of external pressures. 

    The EU does not impose change without consultation. Apple has participated in discussions and knows what's likely coming down the pipe. We will surely see more efforts over the coming years to reverse current tactics on design and repair. 

    We can expect a lot more spin as Apple details its changes as 'voluntary' before directives come into effect. 

    1) You need to learn to write more succinctly instead of repeating yourself. Your verbal diarrhea is a bit much on the best of days.

    2) Again, this is not out of line for Apple. Their goal is what is best for Apple. If that means offering some repair guides, tools, and parts to benefit their bottom line in the long run then they'll do it. If they feel that it's best for them to stop they will. It's called business. Do I need to remind you of any of the countess other changes that  Apple and every other company makes when laws change, public opinion changes, tech changes. Just fucking enjoy that it's gong to be an option the time being.
    williamlondonSoliwatto_cobra
  • Reply 19 of 24
    avon b7avon b7 Posts: 5,959member
    Xed said:
    avon b7 said:
    Xed said:
    avon b7 said:
    Sometimes it is better for him not to say anything. This is one of those moments. When spin smells to much like spin it loses value fast. 

    The move itself is a good move. Now the best move would be to design for repair and make them easier to carry out.
    How is it spin? You are an Android shill but you are still smart enough to understand that Cook makes moves that he believes will benefit Apple, specifically Apple’s share price. If you think Cook was not part of this decision or that he failed understand the forces at play determine what was the best course of action for Apple then you really don’t understand why Apple is worth $2.5 trillion nor why it took in nearly $400 billion in revenue for 2021.
    Apple has spent millions on lobbying against right to repair in general and made devices progressively harder to repair. Sometimes requiring non faulty or damaged parts to be replaced as part of a repair. It hasn't been able to guarantee its own staff won't damage a device on taking it apart. Case in point when I took an iPhone in for a battery replacement, I was required to sign a form accepting that the technician could break the device just by trying to get into it and in such case they would hand it back damaged or offer me a refurbished unit at a price I had to accept before handing the device over. This is because the devices are not designed for repair. They are geared for replacement.

    In all these years Apple has done little to nothing to give users options for self repair. 

    Now we get a surprise about turn in tactics and I'm sure it is because Apple sees itself under growing scrutiny and needs a few bones to throw out.

    Good moves, on the face of it but in no way in line with their previous practices. 

    Of course, the decision needs to be 'sold' (that's understandable from a marketing and PR perspective) but you can go too far. 

    Tim is spinning this as Apple doing good and helping users, leading us to believe they always had users front and foremost for repair. That isn't the case. Never has been. Even years ago a Scandinavian consumer body took Apple to task demonstrating a fault that Apple denied existed. Apple is always front and foremost. Fast forward and we have the question about that short screen connector in laptops which Apple denied is a problem in spite of making it longer in newer designs. 

    Like I said, when spin goes to far, it's better not to say anything and let commentators do the selling. So far, this move seems to have been well accepted. The devil will be in the details but on face value it is a move in the right direction. Just don't ask me to believe Apple decided to do this from internal will. This, IMO, is a direct result of external pressures. 

    The EU does not impose change without consultation. Apple has participated in discussions and knows what's likely coming down the pipe. We will surely see more efforts over the coming years to reverse current tactics on design and repair. 

    We can expect a lot more spin as Apple details its changes as 'voluntary' before directives come into effect. 

    1) You need to learn to write more succinctly instead of repeating yourself. Your verbal diarrhea is a bit much on the best of days.

    2) Again, this is not out of line for Apple. Their goal is what is best for Apple. If that means offering some repair guides, tools, and parts to benefit their bottom line in the long run then they'll do it. If they feel that it's best for them to stop they will. It's called business. Do I need to remind you of any of the countess other changes that  Apple and every other company makes when laws change, public opinion changes, tech changes. Just fucking enjoy that it's gong to be an option the time being.
    Let simplify it for you even if it means repeating myself. 

    IMO, it's still spin. 

    That was your question. I answered it. 
    muthuk_vanalingamMplsPelijahg
  • Reply 20 of 24
    MplsPMplsP Posts: 3,441member
    Xed said:
    avon b7 said:
    Xed said:
    avon b7 said:
    Sometimes it is better for him not to say anything. This is one of those moments. When spin smells to much like spin it loses value fast. 

    The move itself is a good move. Now the best move would be to design for repair and make them easier to carry out.
    How is it spin? You are an Android shill but you are still smart enough to understand that Cook makes moves that he believes will benefit Apple, specifically Apple’s share price. If you think Cook was not part of this decision or that he failed understand the forces at play determine what was the best course of action for Apple then you really don’t understand why Apple is worth $2.5 trillion nor why it took in nearly $400 billion in revenue for 2021.
    Apple has spent millions on lobbying against right to repair in general and made devices progressively harder to repair. Sometimes requiring non faulty or damaged parts to be replaced as part of a repair. It hasn't been able to guarantee its own staff won't damage a device on taking it apart. Case in point when I took an iPhone in for a battery replacement, I was required to sign a form accepting that the technician could break the device just by trying to get into it and in such case they would hand it back damaged or offer me a refurbished unit at a price I had to accept before handing the device over. This is because the devices are not designed for repair. They are geared for replacement.

    In all these years Apple has done little to nothing to give users options for self repair. 

    Now we get a surprise about turn in tactics and I'm sure it is because Apple sees itself under growing scrutiny and needs a few bones to throw out.

    Good moves, on the face of it but in no way in line with their previous practices. 

    Of course, the decision needs to be 'sold' (that's understandable from a marketing and PR perspective) but you can go too far. 

    Tim is spinning this as Apple doing good and helping users, leading us to believe they always had users front and foremost for repair. That isn't the case. Never has been. Even years ago a Scandinavian consumer body took Apple to task demonstrating a fault that Apple denied existed. Apple is always front and foremost. Fast forward and we have the question about that short screen connector in laptops which Apple denied is a problem in spite of making it longer in newer designs. 

    Like I said, when spin goes to far, it's better not to say anything and let commentators do the selling. So far, this move seems to have been well accepted. The devil will be in the details but on face value it is a move in the right direction. Just don't ask me to believe Apple decided to do this from internal will. This, IMO, is a direct result of external pressures. 

    The EU does not impose change without consultation. Apple has participated in discussions and knows what's likely coming down the pipe. We will surely see more efforts over the coming years to reverse current tactics on design and repair. 

    We can expect a lot more spin as Apple details its changes as 'voluntary' before directives come into effect. 

    1) You need to learn to write more succinctly instead of repeating yourself. Your verbal diarrhea is a bit much on the best of days.

    2) Again, this is not out of line for Apple. Their goal is what is best for Apple. If that means offering some repair guides, tools, and parts to benefit their bottom line in the long run then they'll do it. If they feel that it's best for them to stop they will. It's called business. Do I need to remind you of any of the countess other changes that  Apple and every other company makes when laws change, public opinion changes, tech changes. Just fucking enjoy that it's gong to be an option the time being.
    Actually, @"avon b7" made a very good argument and took the time to clearly state the different points of his argument and address likely counterarguments. Had s/he been more succinct you would have complained that s/he was just making arguments without any evidence.

    @"Avon b7" is right - Apple has spent a considerable amount of time and energy fighting right to repair initiatives. I'm glad they have changed course, but for Tim Cook to come out and make a bunch of glowing statements about how 'good it feels' rings pretty hollow. 
    muthuk_vanalingamelijahgwilliamlondon
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