Wemo Smart Video Doorbell review: The new HomeKit doorbell of choice

Posted:
in General Discussion edited January 19
This HomeKit Secure Video doorbell is the epitome of an Apple smart home device. Let's take a close look at the just-announced Belkin Wemo Smart Video Doorbell.

Belkin Wemo Smart Video Doorbell
Belkin Wemo Smart Video Doorbell


Revealed during the annual Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas, Belkin has continued its push into HomeKit-first accessories.

The Belkin Wemo Smart Video Doorbell measures 4.9 inches tall and 1.7 inches wide. Many have questioned how thick the doorbell is, and it is marginally thicker than its closest competitor -- the Logitech Circle View Wired Doorbell. The Wemo is 1.4 inches deep, while the Logitech is 1.1 inches. If you use the angled wedge plate, it does extend to 2.1 inches which is on the thick side.




It has a 4MP sensor that captures 1200x1600 video with a 178-degree field of view. It works exclusively with Apple HomeKit and supports HomeKit Secure Video, which means all cloud recordings are stored securely inside of iCloud.

Like most HomeKit doorbells, it connects over Wi-Fi and supports 2.4GHz and 5GHz connections. The doorbell also incorporates infrared enhanced night vision for low-light, motion detection, and two-way communication.



Belkin Wemo Smart Video Doorbell review - Installation

Most people won't have any issues installing the Wemo doorbell. The doorbell only connects with a single pair of wires that shouldn't pose a problem to even the most novice users. That said, if you are hesitant or are buying this as a gift, Belkin does offer a professionally installed version through OnTech -- at a $99 fee, of course.

Connecting to your chime takes a little more tinkering, but in all, we knocked out our install in under 15 minutes.

If this is your first smart doorbell, you may need to use the included drill bit to drill pilot holes into your doorframe. The Wemo doorbell is slightly larger than a typical doorbell button and won't fit into existing holes.

Back of the Wemo doorbell
The back of the Wemo doorbell


With the power off, remove your existing doorbell or video doorbell. We then used a Philips screwdriver to secure the two wires into the mounting plate. With the wires connected, we then screwed the plate onto the wall.

The screws are long, lending towards a more secure install than the half-inch screws common on other devices. Optionally, you can install the wedge mount, which will angle the camera and fits on the left or the right.

Two spring pins are situated on the front of the plate and pressed into two contact points on the back of the doorbell. Slide the doorbell over the pin at the top and tighten the screw at the bottom.




The doorbell is held in place with a Torx screw rather than a Philips, which helps bolster the security. If you don't have Torx drivers handy, there's one included.

After the installation is complete, it's time to turn to the HomeKit setup.

Belkin Wemo Smart Video Doorbell - HomeKit support

A sticker bearing your unique HomeKit pairing code is stuck on the camera's back, which is easy to access but isn't convenient during the setup process. You could plug the camera into a Micro USB cable and pair it before finishing the installation, or you can install it and scan the code on the back pages of the setup manual.

HomeKit setup
HomeKit setup


A modal dialog sequence walks you through the basics of adding a new HomeKit accessory. Give your accessory a name, assign it a location in your home, and choose when your camera will record, stream, or be set to private. You're also able to determine who in your home has access to these streams or recordings.

After that, you can toggle facial recognition on or off and set access control.

More of the HomeKit setup
More of the HomeKit setup


The last few steps in the setup include choosing your chime preferences and enabling any automations that HomeKit suggests.

At this point, the camera is largely good to go. If you dive into the features a bit, you're able to hone the experience more suitably to your needs.

As an example, HomeKit allows you to set customized activity zones. Without activity zones, any motion will trigger the camera. Any car rambling down the road will send an unnecessary alert to our phone. By setting activity zones limited to our driveway and porch, we only get the notifications we want.

Video interface in HomeKit
The video interface in HomeKit


Beyond that, you can set notifications to filter based on activity type. You can filter to allow only notifications of vehicles, people, animals, packages, or any combination of the lot. This ensures you don't get hit with notification fatigue and start ignoring alerts that come in.

Other benefits of HomeKit include rich notifications that can stream a live feed from your door, notifications on your Apple TV, and a chime that will ring on your designated HomePods or HomePod minis.

We have a HomeKit wall switch that controls our porch light for our setup. That allows us to create an automation routine where the porch light turns on whenever the Wemo Smart Video Doorbell detects motion.

Belkin Wemo Smart Video Doorbell
Belkin Wemo Smart Video Doorbell


Any qualms we have are more with HomeKit than the doorbell itself. Apple's interface for perusing video clips is a bit lackluster, and there is still no way to quickly change a camera's privacy mode with a scene or Siri.

At least firmware updates can be done through the Home app now, with Belkin being the first to take advantage of this.

Belkin Wemo Smart Video Doorbell - Video quality

The video quality captured by the doorbell is almost as important as the deep integration to HomeKit. As mentioned, this camera captures 1200 by 1600 video. This is tailored for viewing on mobile by being taller than it is wide.

The 178-degree field of view is also quite expansive. We can see both the brickwork to the left of our doorbell, as well as our door. We can see the doormat and the top of the doorframe. There's no way someone would be able to approach the door without being spotted.

Wemo versus Arlo video quality and field of view
Wemo versus Arlo video quality and field of view


Belkin does tout HDR deep in its list of specs, but the background was just blown out. Compared to the Arlo doorbell cam, the Belkin Wemo lost some detail and contrast in the sunlit driveway versus our shady porch.

How this works out for you will vary. If you're southern-facing, the sun might be an issue during parts of the day. You may have to fiddle with mounting angles to get it just right.

Belkin Wemo Smart Video Doorbell
Belkin Wemo Smart Video Doorbell


HomeKit limits the video capture resolution from cameras. With any luck, the maximum resolution will see a boost in future updates to iCloud. We'd need new hardware to support higher resolutions, though.

Should you buy the Belkin Wemo Smart Video Doorbell?

As it stands, if you want the best HomeKit video doorbell, Wemo is what you want. In the market, there are only a handful of video doorbells that currently take full advantage of HomeKit by supporting HomeKit Secure Video.

You can choose between the Logitech Circle View, the Robin ProLine, or the Robin ProLine Compact. If you're ok with just vanilla HomeKit support, you can opt for the Netatmo Secure Video Doorbell, the Arlo Wired Video Doorbell, or the Yobi B3 -- though that last one is basically vaporware at this point.

Belkin Wemo Smart Video Doorbell
Belkin Wemo Smart Video Doorbell


Its closest competitor is the Logitech Circle View. Still, Wemo has two benefits in its wider field of view and the ability to perform firmware updates manually in the Home app. So deciding between the two, we have to give it to the Belkin Wemo Smart Video Doorbell.

We appreciate how easy installing the Wemo doorbell was, and its HomeKit support is top-notch. HomeKit remains the largest problem in the doorbell category, and Apple has periodically addressed these in iOS updates.

Belkin Wemo Smart Video Doorbell
Belkin Wemo Smart Video Doorbell


As it stands, if you want the best smart video doorbell to work with HomeKit today, Wemo has to be your choice. Tomorrow is another story, as the category has yet to fully mature.

Belkin Wemo Smart Video Doorbell pros
  • Support for Apple HomeKit and works With HomeKit Secure Video

  • Motion and doorbell notifications on Apple TV

  • Chime on HomePod and HomePod mini

  • Ultra-wide 178-degree field of view

  • Supports both 2.4GHz and 5GHz Wi-Fi unlike many smart home devices

  • Infrared night vision

  • No additional subscription required outside of iCloud
Belkin Wemo Smart Video Doorbell cons
  • With the wedge, it is very thick

  • Doesn't support Alexa or Google Assistant - your mileage may vary on if this is actually a con, though

  • No wireless version available with HomeKit

  • HDR is lackluster

Rating: 4.5 out of 5

Where to buy

You can preorder the Belkin Wemo Smart Video Doorbell now from Belkin's website for $249. It's expected to begin shipping in February or March.

Read on AppleInsider
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Comments

  • Reply 1 of 42
    rraburrabu Posts: 254member
    Another con for the Logitech is that it is still not available in many countries like Canada…
    scstrrfwatto_cobra
  • Reply 2 of 42
    JapheyJaphey Posts: 1,067member
    Like I said previously, this will probably be my first smart doorbell. And, like I asked earlier…what material is the outside casing made from? Is it metal? Is it plastic? This information should be included in the review. 
    ioniclewatto_cobra
  • Reply 3 of 42
    Andrew_OSUAndrew_OSU Posts: 509member, editor
    Japhey said:
    Like I said previously, this will probably be my first smart doorbell. And, like I asked earlier…what material is the outside casing made from? Is it metal? Is it plastic? This information should be included in the review. 
    It will always be plastic for connectivity. The only metal one is the Robin ProLine because it uses PoE rather than Wi-Fi. Every other HomeKit doorbell is plastic. The mounting plate is metal though.
    gregoriusmscstrrfexceptionhandlerwatto_cobra
  • Reply 4 of 42
    How much better is this vs the Nest Hello wired doorbell? 

    Can I bypass my doorbell chime and if so what can I use to know that someone is ringing the doorbell? Will the HomePod mini work? 

    Is there a monthly fee? 
    24/7 recording or even recording only?
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 5 of 42
    Total Fail. Need a battery version. 
    Sorry, but so many people these days do not have wires for their doorbells. No new houses in the UK have wires installed. 
    ioniclewatto_cobra
  • Reply 6 of 42
    Total Fail. Need a battery version. 
    Sorry, but so many people these days do not have wires for their doorbells. No new houses in the UK have wires installed. 
    Yes and no, i currently have a wireless one and changing the battery is a chore, im willing to whip out the drill and get some
    calking/silicone and do an install….. only has to be done once and then no more battery changes!
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 7 of 42
    So the Wemo has a wider viewing angle than the Logitech, and the Logitech provides color night vision, excellent HDR (more important than many realize until it’s installed and being used), costs $50 less, and looks less like something you’d have an oncologist look at.
    h4y3swatto_cobra
  • Reply 8 of 42
    AppleZuluAppleZulu Posts: 1,309member
    Is it still the case that there is only one doorbell “ringtone” option when using HomePods as the doorbell chime? 

    The review above is thorough, but skips through “choosing your chime preferences.” I’d sure like to see some detail on that, because those options and settings aren’t visible until after you’ve bought a HomeKit doorbell and you’re setting it up. I currently have a ‘dumb’ doorbell that rings with Westminster chimes, and don’t want to give that up for a weak chime with no options to customize. 
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 9 of 42
    AppleZuluAppleZulu Posts: 1,309member
    So the Wemo has a wider viewing angle than the Logitech, and the Logitech provides color night vision, excellent HDR (more important than many realize until it’s installed and being used), costs $50 less, and looks less like something you’d have an oncologist look at.
    This is an option that I don’t think a lot of people fully understand. Color night vision is implemented by having a bright visible-light spotlight that’s either always on or turns on with a motion sensor. 

    Black-and-white night vision is achieved using infrared lighting that isn’t visible to humans or animals (but is visible to the camera, which translates it into visible B&W for you and me). Looking directly at the camera, the most you’ll see at night are some very dim red LEDs. 

    It’s personal preference, but I don’t want doorbells and security cameras that disturb the natural nighttime darkness. Depending on proximity, your neighbors might not like that, either. 

    So for some of us, cameras and doorbells with “color night vision” are a firm nope
    gregoriusmbeowulfschmidtwatto_cobra
  • Reply 10 of 42
    mike1mike1 Posts: 2,843member
    ionicle said:
    Total Fail. Need a battery version. 
    Sorry, but so many people these days do not have wires for their doorbells. No new houses in the UK have wires installed. 
    Yes and no, i currently have a wireless one and changing the battery is a chore, im willing to whip out the drill and get some
    calking/silicone and do an install….. only has to be done once and then no more battery changes!

    From where would you get power? Drilling the hole is easy. Wiring is the pain-in-the-butt part.

    I too would like a battery-operated version. I already keep a spare battery for my Ring and swap out every 4-6 weeks. I wouldn't mind doing it more often if necessary to have this camera's functionality.
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 11 of 42
    AppleZuluAppleZulu Posts: 1,309member
    mike1 said:
    ionicle said:
    Total Fail. Need a battery version. 
    Sorry, but so many people these days do not have wires for their doorbells. No new houses in the UK have wires installed. 
    Yes and no, i currently have a wireless one and changing the battery is a chore, im willing to whip out the drill and get some
    calking/silicone and do an install….. only has to be done once and then no more battery changes!

    From where would you get power? Drilling the hole is easy. Wiring is the pain-in-the-butt part.

    I too would like a battery-operated version. I already keep a spare battery for my Ring and swap out every 4-6 weeks. I wouldn't mind doing it more often if necessary to have this camera's functionality.
    It's my understanding that Apple's protocol for HomeKit precludes battery powered cameras. I believe this is due to the facial/object/pattern recognition activity used to trigger various functions, which means the camera is always active and looking, so batteries would drain fairly quickly. While you individually are o.k. with frequent battery changes, the inevitable resulting customer complaints and dissatisfaction for short battery life would be inconsistent with Apple's ethos. 

    muthuk_vanalingammike1watto_cobra
  • Reply 12 of 42
    JapheyJaphey Posts: 1,067member
    Japhey said:
    Like I said previously, this will probably be my first smart doorbell. And, like I asked earlier…what material is the outside casing made from? Is it metal? Is it plastic? This information should be included in the review. 
    It will always be plastic for connectivity. The only metal one is the Robin ProLine because it uses PoE rather than Wi-Fi. Every other HomeKit doorbell is plastic. The mounting plate is metal though.
    Thank you for your reply. 
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 13 of 42
    Total Fail. Need a battery version. 
    Sorry, but so many people these days do not have wires for their doorbells. No new houses in the UK have wires installed. 
    I just don’t get the craziness of the UK when it comes to electrical stuff. They don’t have to provide doorbell wiring - relying on the installation of battery operated stuff - but when it comes to smoke alarms they have to be mains wired rather than allowing fully battery operated installations - resulting in millions now being unsafe because they’re over 10 years old and have never been replaced.

    And that’s before I get into the lack of outlets installed that are completely insufficient in number for modern needs! The regulations are so prescriptive but based on the position some 20 years ago. But as always, if you define minimum regulations, builders will race to produce the minimum requirements at the cheapest possible cost.
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 14 of 42
    AppleZulu said:
    So the Wemo has a wider viewing angle than the Logitech, and the Logitech provides color night vision, excellent HDR (more important than many realize until it’s installed and being used), costs $50 less, and looks less like something you’d have an oncologist look at.
    This is an option that I don’t think a lot of people fully understand. Color night vision is implemented by having a bright visible-light spotlight that’s either always on or turns on with a motion sensor. 

    Black-and-white night vision is achieved using infrared lighting that isn’t visible to humans or animals (but is visible to the camera, which translates it into visible B&W for you and me). Looking directly at the camera, the most you’ll see at night are some very dim red LEDs. 

    It’s personal preference, but I don’t want doorbells and security cameras that disturb the natural nighttime darkness. Depending on proximity, your neighbors might not like that, either. 

    So for some of us, cameras and doorbells with “color night vision” are a firm nope
    I get what you’re saying—however, the light comes on only with proximity triggering, does not light up the night sky (just the 10 feet or so from the doorbell position), and provides a superior ability to ID a person who has come to your door who may not be a nice person. The infrared cameras (I have those too, of course) will change the color of the garments worn, and provide a significantly degraded image quality if providing an ID of that person is needed. You can see actions mostly clearly, but rarely the actor.

    In my neighborhood, no big deal, but I get that you might not like that feature (which can be toggled off in settings if desired). Still, aside from the wider field of view (which doesn’t close the deal in my circumstances, but may for others), the feature set of the Logitech plus the lower price point mean I am not looking wistfully over the back fence at the Wemo. I am simply happy there are more choices, which can lead to wider options and lower price points.
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 15 of 42
    AppleZuluAppleZulu Posts: 1,309member
    AppleZulu said:
    So the Wemo has a wider viewing angle than the Logitech, and the Logitech provides color night vision, excellent HDR (more important than many realize until it’s installed and being used), costs $50 less, and looks less like something you’d have an oncologist look at.
    This is an option that I don’t think a lot of people fully understand. Color night vision is implemented by having a bright visible-light spotlight that’s either always on or turns on with a motion sensor. 

    Black-and-white night vision is achieved using infrared lighting that isn’t visible to humans or animals (but is visible to the camera, which translates it into visible B&W for you and me). Looking directly at the camera, the most you’ll see at night are some very dim red LEDs. 

    It’s personal preference, but I don’t want doorbells and security cameras that disturb the natural nighttime darkness. Depending on proximity, your neighbors might not like that, either. 

    So for some of us, cameras and doorbells with “color night vision” are a firm nope
    I get what you’re saying—however, the light comes on only with proximity triggering, does not light up the night sky (just the 10 feet or so from the doorbell position), and provides a superior ability to ID a person who has come to your door who may not be a nice person. The infrared cameras (I have those too, of course) will change the color of the garments worn, and provide a significantly degraded image quality if providing an ID of that person is needed. You can see actions mostly clearly, but rarely the actor.

    In my neighborhood, no big deal, but I get that you might not like that feature (which can be toggled off in settings if desired). Still, aside from the wider field of view (which doesn’t close the deal in my circumstances, but may for others), the feature set of the Logitech plus the lower price point mean I am not looking wistfully over the back fence at the Wemo. I am simply happy there are more choices, which can lead to wider options and lower price points.
    Choice is good, but my primary lament is that I don't think most people understand the choice. And while I'm sure the LED spot on the visible-light doorbell doesn't light up the night sky, for a lot of applications, a street-facing doorbell camera's motion sensor is going to be frequently triggered all day and all night, even with zones marked out to try to minimize it. Also, while I agree full color can help with identifying baddies, I just this week watched an IR video from a Ring doorbell when a fellow tried and failed to entice a friend to come to the door in the middle of the night. Even in IR B&W, that person should be pretty easy to ID. Also, also, if I recall correctly, the visible spotlight on the Logitech doorbell can indeed be toggled off in settings, but that just means you get no useful functionality at night. 

    What I'd like to see is the best of both worlds. The default would be an infrared spotlight at night, but when a human is detected (HomeKit does that already...), only then would it switch on the visible light for a full-color image. It would light the way for friends, ID and/or scare away miscreants and capture fun videos of undisturbed night-time wildlife wandering by, which is (fortunately) almost always what my cameras capture, anyway.

    Even more also, since you have yourself set up a HomeKit doorbell, do you have any insight into my other question in this thread? If you use HomePods as the sound for your doorbell chime, is there any choice or customization available for what chime sound will play? I'd like to know, but that setting isn't visible in the Home app until after you've bought and installed a HomeKit-compatible doorbell. As that's a factor for me in any decision to buy a HomeKit doorbell, I sure wish I could see that setting's options for myself first.
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 16 of 42
    mike1mike1 Posts: 2,843member
    AppleZulu said:
    mike1 said:
    ionicle said:
    Total Fail. Need a battery version. 
    Sorry, but so many people these days do not have wires for their doorbells. No new houses in the UK have wires installed. 
    Yes and no, i currently have a wireless one and changing the battery is a chore, im willing to whip out the drill and get some
    calking/silicone and do an install….. only has to be done once and then no more battery changes!

    From where would you get power? Drilling the hole is easy. Wiring is the pain-in-the-butt part.

    I too would like a battery-operated version. I already keep a spare battery for my Ring and swap out every 4-6 weeks. I wouldn't mind doing it more often if necessary to have this camera's functionality.
    It's my understanding that Apple's protocol for HomeKit precludes battery powered cameras. I believe this is due to the facial/object/pattern recognition activity used to trigger various functions, which means the camera is always active and looking, so batteries would drain fairly quickly. While you individually are o.k. with frequent battery changes, the inevitable resulting customer complaints and dissatisfaction for short battery life would be inconsistent with Apple's ethos. 

    Thanks for the response. May be a requirement for Secure Video to function, but I have several Arlo cameras that are battery operated. I use the solar panels to keep them charged, but they are recognized as battery powered and work through HK (not with Secure Video, though. I think that was Arlo's choice as they sell their own service.)
    edited January 14 watto_cobra
  • Reply 17 of 42
    mike1mike1 Posts: 2,843member
    Naiyas said:
    Total Fail. Need a battery version. 
    Sorry, but so many people these days do not have wires for their doorbells. No new houses in the UK have wires installed. 
    I just don’t get the craziness of the UK when it comes to electrical stuff. They don’t have to provide doorbell wiring - relying on the installation of battery operated stuff - but when it comes to smoke alarms they have to be mains wired rather than allowing fully battery operated installations - resulting in millions now being unsafe because they’re over 10 years old and have never been replaced.

    And that’s before I get into the lack of outlets installed that are completely insufficient in number for modern needs! The regulations are so prescriptive but based on the position some 20 years ago. But as always, if you define minimum regulations, builders will race to produce the minimum requirements at the cheapest possible cost.

    Almost all regulations apply only to new construction or major renovations. Completely impractical, if not impossible to force modern standards on older construction.
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 18 of 42
    AppleZuluAppleZulu Posts: 1,309member
    mike1 said:
    AppleZulu said:
    mike1 said:
    ionicle said:
    Total Fail. Need a battery version. 
    Sorry, but so many people these days do not have wires for their doorbells. No new houses in the UK have wires installed. 
    Yes and no, i currently have a wireless one and changing the battery is a chore, im willing to whip out the drill and get some
    calking/silicone and do an install….. only has to be done once and then no more battery changes!

    From where would you get power? Drilling the hole is easy. Wiring is the pain-in-the-butt part.

    I too would like a battery-operated version. I already keep a spare battery for my Ring and swap out every 4-6 weeks. I wouldn't mind doing it more often if necessary to have this camera's functionality.
    It's my understanding that Apple's protocol for HomeKit precludes battery powered cameras. I believe this is due to the facial/object/pattern recognition activity used to trigger various functions, which means the camera is always active and looking, so batteries would drain fairly quickly. While you individually are o.k. with frequent battery changes, the inevitable resulting customer complaints and dissatisfaction for short battery life would be inconsistent with Apple's ethos. 

    Thanks for the response. May be a requirement for Secure Video to function, but I have several Arlo cameras that are battery operated. I use the solar panels to keep them charged, but they are recognized as battery powered and work through HK (not with Secure Video, though. I think that was Arlo's choice as they sell their own service.)
    I have some Arlo cameras with solar panels as well. I think plugging them into the solar panels 'tricks' HomeKit into seeing them as wired to the mains. I don't think HomeKit can see the difference, so long as the camera is plugged into an external power source. You're correct about Arlo's non-participation in HK Secure Video. I'm a little surprised they haven't totally forced the issue and eliminated the free tier option for using their cloud recording service if you have five or fewer cameras. 
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 19 of 42
    AppleZulu said:
    mike1 said:
    AppleZulu said:
    mike1 said:
    ionicle said:
    Total Fail. Need a battery version. 
    Sorry, but so many people these days do not have wires for their doorbells. No new houses in the UK have wires installed. 
    Yes and no, i currently have a wireless one and changing the battery is a chore, im willing to whip out the drill and get some
    calking/silicone and do an install….. only has to be done once and then no more battery changes!

    From where would you get power? Drilling the hole is easy. Wiring is the pain-in-the-butt part.

    I too would like a battery-operated version. I already keep a spare battery for my Ring and swap out every 4-6 weeks. I wouldn't mind doing it more often if necessary to have this camera's functionality.
    It's my understanding that Apple's protocol for HomeKit precludes battery powered cameras. I believe this is due to the facial/object/pattern recognition activity used to trigger various functions, which means the camera is always active and looking, so batteries would drain fairly quickly. While you individually are o.k. with frequent battery changes, the inevitable resulting customer complaints and dissatisfaction for short battery life would be inconsistent with Apple's ethos. 

    Thanks for the response. May be a requirement for Secure Video to function, but I have several Arlo cameras that are battery operated. I use the solar panels to keep them charged, but they are recognized as battery powered and work through HK (not with Secure Video, though. I think that was Arlo's choice as they sell their own service.)
    I have some Arlo cameras with solar panels as well. I think plugging them into the solar panels 'tricks' HomeKit into seeing them as wired to the mains. I don't think HomeKit can see the difference, so long as the camera is plugged into an external power source. You're correct about Arlo's non-participation in HK Secure Video. I'm a little surprised they haven't totally forced the issue and eliminated the free tier option for using their cloud recording service if you have five or fewer cameras. 
    Eufy do HSV battery cameras. They work well, with or without the solar power option.  
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 20 of 42
    Andrew_OSUAndrew_OSU Posts: 509member, editor
    great15p said:
    How much better is this vs the Nest Hello wired doorbell? 

    Can I bypass my doorbell chime and if so what can I use to know that someone is ringing the doorbell? Will the HomePod mini work? 

    Is there a monthly fee? 
    24/7 recording or even recording only?
    Yes you can bypass the chime, it is a toggle on setup. HomePod mini and OG HomePod will also work as chimes if you want. You can to set exactly what chimes. There is no monthly fee, other than iCloud. No 24/7 recording, but will record any time there is motion.
    watto_cobra
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