If Apple replaced your iPhone or Mac, expect an email about a class action settlement

Posted:
in General Discussion
Administrators of Apple's $95 million settlement over the definition of refurbished replacement devices is now contacting customers who may be eligible for a payout.

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Back in 2021, Apple agreed to pay $95 million to settle a class action lawsuit alleging that it offered refurbished replacement devices that were not "equivalent to new in performance and reliability."

Recently, the website for the "Replacement Device Lawsuit" has been updated and case administrators have begun contacting potential class members who could be eligible for a payment.

Customers who purchased AppleCare or AppleCare+ for an iPhone and iPad on or after July 20, 2012 and received a refurbished replacement device could be included in the class.

The lawsuit originated in 2016, when claimants alleged that refurbished or remanufactured devices offered by Apple as replacements were not functionally the same as new products. The complaint alleged that replacement devices were "secondhand unit[s] that [have] been modified to appear to be new."

Apple has agreed to settlement the lawsuit with a $95 million payment, but did not publicly admit to any wrongdoing. It still denies that refurbished devices are somehow inferior to new products.

Although the settlement has received preliminary approval, a final hearing is slated for April 27, 2022. Class members won't be able to receive any payments before then.

Read on AppleInsider
Roderikus

Comments

  • Reply 1 of 12
    Fred257Fred257 Posts: 164member
    I remember when Apple was going to replace my battery in my iPhone SE. They came back from the back room and said that they destroyed my phone. They supposed gave me a new phone but the camera was nowhere near as good at taking photos as my other phone. I believe they gave me an inferior product. Hopefully I see some money out of this
    Roderikus
  • Reply 2 of 12
    This evil business practice - when this story s right - makes me puke
    edited January 25
  • Reply 3 of 12
    badmonkbadmonk Posts: 1,072member
    I usually buy only refurbished Macs and I have gotten replacement iPhones in the past and I have to say they have been great for me,  I think they have been rigorously tested, maybe more than the standard production units?

    In fact the only “lemon” Mac I have purchased in multiple decades and more than two dozen Macs, was new and not refurbished.

    In all cases the refurbished units have looked indistinguishable from new.

    I thought we were suppose to be environmentally conscious and not generate more e-waste than we have to.
    Dogperson
  • Reply 4 of 12
    Fred257 said:
    I remember when Apple was going to replace my battery in my iPhone SE. They came back from the back room and said that they destroyed my phone. They supposed gave me a new phone but the camera was nowhere near as good at taking photos as my other phone. I believe they gave me an inferior product. Hopefully I see some money out of this

    Good luck.  With class action lawsuits, the lawyers typically get most of the money.  Maybe you'll get $5 or a coupon good for an iPhone accessory or something.  That's usually about all the people who actually suffered damages end up getting.

  • Reply 5 of 12
    badmonk said:
    I usually buy only refurbished Macs and I have gotten replacement iPhones in the past and I have to say they have been great for me,  I think they have been rigorously tested, maybe more than the standard production units?

    In fact the only “lemon” Mac I have purchased in multiple decades and more than two dozen Macs, was new and not refurbished.

    In all cases the refurbished units have looked indistinguishable from new.

    I thought we were suppose to be environmentally conscious and not generate more e-waste than we have to.
    I'm sure refurb directly from Apple is far different, but I procured a purportedly refurbished Mac mini from Woot. It did not boot, and there was layer of lint inside the removable bottom.
  • Reply 6 of 12
    jimh2jimh2 Posts: 401member
    Apple refurbs purchased directly from them are as good as buying new. Same warranty with no marks or scratches. The only way you can tell is the by the box and possibly if it is not on the latest version of the OS. The refurb phones and Macs were most likely better than what you turned in.

    As for expecting something from a class action lawsuit...you are dreaming. Enjoy your coupon or $25 towards your next iPhone. The lawyers are the only ones who win in class actions. The results are so one-sided that it is all but fraudulent to trick people into thinking they will get something substantial if the suit is won knowing that the class members will get screwed by being offered a pittance.
    Dogperson
  • Reply 7 of 12
    I have bought more than a few Apple refurbs, iPod, iPad, iPhone, watch. All have been tested and with a new case and battery. Just reusing the motherboard! 
    Lawyers are feeding at a trough that should be empty. 
  • Reply 8 of 12
    The last time I was a part of a class-action lawsuit was the Blockbuster one, and the result was a coupon for free rentals and some popcorn. Lawyers made out like bandits. I worked for Blockbuster. I got free movies anyway. 
  • Reply 9 of 12
    GeorgeBMacGeorgeBMac Posts: 11,421member
    I've only had one phone replaced by Apple:   My beat up 4 year old iPhone 6+ was replaced with one that was either brand new or ran and looked like it was (no way for me to tell).

    Then, last summer they replaced my scratched up AppleWatch Series 4 with, again, one that looks and runs like a brand new one.

    But:  I protest!  I think Apple should pay be me money!   /s

    (Actually, my real complaint is:  I want a Series 7 Watch -- but can't get myself to replace watch that runs (almost) perfectly.  The idea just offends me on many different levels)
    muthuk_vanalingam
  • Reply 10 of 12
    I've only had one phone replaced by Apple:   My beat up 4 year old iPhone 6+ was replaced with one that was either brand new or ran and looked like it was (no way for me to tell).

    Then, last summer they replaced my scratched up AppleWatch Series 4 with, again, one that looks and runs like a brand new one.

    But:  I protest!  I think Apple should pay be me money!   /s

    (Actually, my real complaint is:  I want a Series 7 Watch -- but can't get myself to replace watch that runs (almost) perfectly.  The idea just offends me on many different levels)
    Your replacement watch was probably a watch that was never used and manufactured to be a replacement. 

    This is why Apple doesn’t elaborate on what kind of device you are getting because for phones and iPads it depends on how old it is. Newer model iPhones and iPads are usually new devices made for use as a replacement. When the model to replace is getting older, Apple has to source out replacements or worse case scenario, actually have older iPhones made from parts they still have. 

    If you get a replacement device and think there is an issue with it, document it, have proof of the issue and then make sure Apple is aware of the issue. Most of the time they will replace the device again, or repair it, if it’s a repairable issue. 

    The irony is if you have a carrier replace your device. Most of the time it’s a poorly refurbished product that may have non-Apple
    parts. 
    edited January 26 GeorgeBMac
  • Reply 11 of 12
    GeorgeBMacGeorgeBMac Posts: 11,421member
    I've only had one phone replaced by Apple:   My beat up 4 year old iPhone 6+ was replaced with one that was either brand new or ran and looked like it was (no way for me to tell).

    Then, last summer they replaced my scratched up AppleWatch Series 4 with, again, one that looks and runs like a brand new one.

    But:  I protest!  I think Apple should pay be me money!   /s

    (Actually, my real complaint is:  I want a Series 7 Watch -- but can't get myself to replace watch that runs (almost) perfectly.  The idea just offends me on many different levels)
    Your replacement watch was probably a watch that was never used and manufactured to be a replacement. 

    This is why Apple doesn’t elaborate on what kind of device you are getting because for phones and iPads it depends on how old it is. Newer model iPhones and iPads are usually new devices made for use as a replacement. When the model to replace is getting older, Apple has to source out replacements or worse case scenario, actually have older iPhones made from parts they still have. 

    If you get a replacement device and think there is an issue with it, document it, have proof of the issue and then make sure Apple is aware of the issue. Most of the time they will replace the device again, or repair it, if it’s a repairable issue. 

    The irony is if you have a carrier replace your device. Most of the time it’s a poorly refurbished product that may have non-Apple
    parts. 

    Apparently they will also upgrade the device if they don't have an exact replacement.
    When the Haptic engine on my Apple Watch Series 0 stopped working they replaced it with a Series 1.
  • Reply 12 of 12
    Is this international?
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