India will make iPhone 14 from launch, says Kuo

Posted:
in iPhone
Analyst Ming-Chi Kuo claims that for the first time, part of Apple's new iPhone 14 range will be made in India "almost simultaneously" with usual suppliers in China.




Shortly after reporting that Apple is diversifying its production with both more companies and more countries, Kuo now says the first sign of this will be with the base iPhone 14.

My latest survey indicates Foxconn's iPhone production site in India will ship the new 6.1" iPhone 14 almost simultaneously with China for the first time in 2H22 (India being one quarter or more behind in the past).

— (Ming-Chi Kuo) (@mingchikuo)
In further tweets, Kuo notes that for the short term, "India's iPhone capacities/shipments still have a considerable gap with China." But he notes that "it's an important milestone for Apple in building a non-Chinese iPhone production site."

"It implies that Apple is trying to reduce the geopolitical impacts on supply," he continues, "and sees the Indian market as the next key growth driver."

Kuo says his report comes from his "latest survey," presumably of the supply chain.

He also repeatedly refers to India making "the 6.1-inch iPhone 14." That's because Apple is expected to add a second model to the non-Pro iPhones, a 6.7-inch "iPhone Max."

Read on AppleInsider

Comments

  • Reply 1 of 4
    Sigh ... this could be a mistake as India nudges closer to Russia ...

    I'd like to see a production facility in a non-BRIC country.
    edited August 5 qwerty52
  • Reply 2 of 4
    This is a fantastic development, some logistical/regulatory issues notwithstanding. 1) Counterweight to China; 2) Contrary to the post above, India is one of America's best friends in the region (there's a reason that the US has fundamentally reframed its foreign policy in the region as being "Indo-Pacific"); 3) Modi's government is incredibly stable and non-corrupt.

    Many in the US overreact to India's neutral stance -- which, I personally I do not agree with -- on the Russia-Ukraine war, missing the point that over 160 countries around the world, including Mexico, Brazil, Indonesia, much of the ME and Africa are either neutral (i.e., abstain from votes) or negative towards the NATO view on it. I might behoove us to ask our foreign policy mavens why that is the case. Moreover, there is a long (75-year), complicated history involving the relationships and UN votes involving Pakistan, Russia, US, China and India around the Kashmir issue that has, rightly or wrongly, led to India's current stance on the war.

    Interested folks can look up all of this and more.
  • Reply 3 of 4
    This is a fantastic development, some logistical/regulatory issues notwithstanding. 1) Counterweight to China; 2) Contrary to the post above, India is one of America's best friends in the region (there's a reason that the US has fundamentally reframed its foreign policy in the region as being "Indo-Pacific"); 3) Modi's government is incredibly stable and non-corrupt.

    Many in the US overreact to India's neutral stance -- which, I personally I do not agree with -- on the Russia-Ukraine war, missing the point that over 160 countries around the world, including Mexico, Brazil, Indonesia, much of the ME and Africa are either neutral (i.e., abstain from votes) or negative towards the NATO view on it. I might behoove us to ask our foreign policy mavens why that is the case. Moreover, there is a long (75-year), complicated history involving the relationships and UN votes involving Pakistan, Russia, US, China and India around the Kashmir issue that has, rightly or wrongly, led to India's current stance on the war.

    Interested folks can look up all of this and more.
    I don't object to Indian market manufacturing in India - pretty much a necessity due to Indian policies - any more than I object to Chinese manufacturing in China for the Chinese market.

    But Modi's been moving closer in the autharitarianism direction and I'd like to see global production facilities in a non-BRIC country.

    As for India's corruption level - the Corruption Perceptions Index doesn't rate India doesn't give India that high a rating.
    edited August 5 qwerty52
  • Reply 4 of 4
    This is a fantastic development, some logistical/regulatory issues notwithstanding. 1) Counterweight to China; 2) Contrary to the post above, India is one of America's best friends in the region (there's a reason that the US has fundamentally reframed its foreign policy in the region as being "Indo-Pacific"); 3) Modi's government is incredibly stable and non-corrupt.

    Many in the US overreact to India's neutral stance -- which, I personally I do not agree with -- on the Russia-Ukraine war, missing the point that over 160 countries around the world, including Mexico, Brazil, Indonesia, much of the ME and Africa are either neutral (i.e., abstain from votes) or negative towards the NATO view on it. I might behoove us to ask our foreign policy mavens why that is the case. Moreover, there is a long (75-year), complicated history involving the relationships and UN votes involving Pakistan, Russia, US, China and India around the Kashmir issue that has, rightly or wrongly, led to India's current stance on the war.

    Interested folks can look up all of this and more.
    I don't object to Indian market manufacturing in India - pretty much a necessity due to Indian policies - any more than I object to Chinese manufacturing in China for the Chinese market.

    But Modi's been moving closer in the autharitarianism direction and I'd like to see global production facilities in a non-BRIC country.

    As for India's corruption level - the Corruption Perceptions Index doesn't rate India doesn't give India that high a rating.
    The "Corruption Perceptions Index" is about as useful as your perception of Modi's authoritarianism (which, I am sure, was picked up from some authoritarianism perception index or more likely, some useless media outlet...)
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