"finder not running"

Posted:
in Genius Bar edited January 2014
What could cause this problem?



System boots fine into 10.2.3, dock appears icons in upper right corner appear. But no menu bar, harddisk icons and when hoovering over the finder icon in the dock "finder not running" appears.



This is all happening on an ibook. Booted it as target disk and ran disk utility and repair file permissions. The ibooks is partitioned with an osx volumen and an os9 volume.



and ideas, couldn't seem to find any pertaining topics on Apples discussion form so I cross-posted between the two sites...

Comments

  • Reply 1 of 12
    spartspart Posts: 2,060member
    What happens when you click the Finder icon?



    Other apps in the dock?



    This should probably be in Genius Bar...
  • Reply 2 of 12
    Quote:

    Originally posted by Spart

    What happens when you click the Finder icon?



    Other apps in the dock?




    ... I guess I should have added:



    "needless to say, nothing runs aside from the dock hiding and showing as the mouse moves over it"
  • Reply 3 of 12
    rampancyrampancy Posts: 363member
    Yes, I have the same problem too, on my G4/400 AGP and iBook 14" 700, both running 10.2.6, except that everything works fine, dock, desktop and all; I just get a "Finder Not Running " message when I roll my mouse over the Finder icon in the dock.



    Have you installed any third-party additions to your system, things like applications that install kernel extensions, or "haxies" perhaps?



    I noticed that I started getting this odd behaviour when installed a flurry of third-party hacks, patches and services to my system, so it's my suspicion that it might be something you installed earlier.
  • Reply 4 of 12
    mossymossy Posts: 8member
    Just happened to me too on my 17" iMac.

    I had to reinstall everything which was a right PITA

    Still not sure what caused it

    Hope you have some better luck!

    Jon
  • Reply 5 of 12
    I don't know about the volumes etc. not coming up, but the "Finder not running" thing I had (I could use the Finder, but the Dock said it was not running), and that was connected to the APE plug-in from Unsanity. However the lates version of that (included in the latest FruitMenu for example) fixed that for me.
  • Reply 6 of 12
    jwilljwill Posts: 209member
    Wow! I thought I was the only one that got that "Finder Not Running" thing. It's quite odd.



    It seems like, sometimes, after you quit the Finder or Dock, it appears to be running (according to the Dock) again. It's annoying because you can't view open windows in it anymore.
  • Reply 7 of 12
    placeboplacebo Posts: 5,767member
    Did you install transparent dock? That messes things up. I must admit that sometimes I actually quit the Finder on purpose, because not having it running speeds up games/photoshop.
  • Reply 8 of 12
    jwilljwill Posts: 209member
    If you mean ClearDock from Unsanity, yes, but it's using factory defaults at the moment.
  • Reply 9 of 12
    aquaticaquatic Posts: 5,602member
    My OS X 10.2.6 is seriously whacked. Funny thing is it happened randomly not after installing ghetto software. I had APE and Ice Coffee and Metallifizer a long time ago. I disabled MenuMaster and Windowshade and no change. Deleted all DS store files with cocktail, no change. The Finder keeps beachballing but the Dock and everything else beachball to so I have to hard reboot. I am having to hard reboot almost twice daily now! I might have to reinstall.
  • Reply 10 of 12
    I'd suggest removing APE and any associated files ASAP. Considering the random and otherwise inexplicable problems that unsanity's software has caused in the past, I wouldn't be surprised it it was up to trouble here.



    Of course, you should go through the typical regiment of /sbin/fsck -fy, repair permissions, and delete caches. If you don't know what I mean by these, say so and I'll (or I'm sure someone else here will) give the explanations.



    Moving to Genius Bar.
  • Reply 11 of 12
    jimzipjimzip Posts: 444member
    Sorry to bring up this thread again, but I was browsing...

    I'd like to know what you mean Brad..

    Quote:

    Originally posted by Brad Of course, you should go through the typical regiment of /sbin/fsck -fy, repair permissions, and delete caches. If you don't know what I mean by these, say so and I'll (or I'm sure someone else here will) give the explanations



    I know about deleting caches, but...



    Jimzip
  • Reply 12 of 12
    Quote:

    Originally posted by Jimzip

    Sorry to bring up this thread again, but I was browsing...

    I'd like to know what you mean Brad..





    I know about deleting caches, but...



    Jimzip




    You can start up in a Terminal-like 'single-user mode' by holding down command-s at startup. Once you have a command-line prompt, you can type



    /sbin/fsck -fy



    /sbin/fsck is the path to the Unix file-system check utility. The -f option forces it to examine your volume; the -y option automatically responds 'yes' to any repair requests that it might make. You can combine the options (without using -f -y) into -fy.



    Permissions repair can be done through Apple's Disk Utility application (under /Applications/Utilities/). Select your volume and choose 'Repair Permissions.'



    Hope this helps!
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