new iMac---awake position vs asleep position

Posted:
in Current Mac Hardware edited January 2014
<a href="http://homepage.mac.com/gavinmcc/PhotoAlbum2.html"; target="_blank">http://homepage.mac.com/gavinmcc/PhotoAlbum2.html</A>;



you don't have to do this, but i like to stand my iMac upright when it is sleeping to increase free desk space...i bring it down and forward when on....g

Comments

  • Reply 1 of 18
    emaneman Posts: 7,204member
    After looking at the pics... how do you live with The Dock that big? On a 15" LCD it seems kinda big.
  • Reply 2 of 18
    imacfpimacfp Posts: 750member
    Well the size doesn't matter if you use dock hiding. It looks so much better somehow on a user's desk. Now if it was only my desk.
  • Reply 3 of 18
    thegeldingthegelding Posts: 3,230member
    just learning x....turned hiding on...thanks...g
  • Reply 4 of 18
    applenutapplenut Posts: 5,768member
    nevermind



    [ 02-03-2002: Message edited by: applenut ]</p>
  • Reply 5 of 18
    actually made dock smaller just for you EmAn and took off hiding....kinda like seeing that dock down there...of course that may wear off as i use X more...but then i can hide it again....but you were right, it was too big...made icons smaller too....now how do i see what applications are use how much ram with X?? g
  • Reply 6 of 18
    Memory allocation is a thing of the past with OS X. OS X dynamically allocates memory to applications, so they can get as much as they need while active, and when inactive they use little to no physical RAM.



    That's just one of the many cool things about OS X you will find. I'm sure you already have noticed, that multitasking is awesome in OS X. You never have to wait for any app, just switch to another one and do stuff.
  • Reply 7 of 18
    emaneman Posts: 7,204member
    [quote]Originally posted by thegelding:

    <strong>now how do i see what applications are use how much ram with X?? g</strong><hr></blockquote>



    Maybe it's too early in the morning for me, but that sentance doesn't make sense. If you're asking how can you tell how much RAM an app uses, you can't. It's not like OS 9.
  • Reply 8 of 18
    low-filow-fi Posts: 357member
    EmAn: You can see how much RAM an application uses (type "top" without quotes in the terminal), you just can't allocate RAM to applications by yourself.
  • Reply 9 of 18
    [quote]Originally posted by Mr A J:

    <strong>EmAn: You can see how much RAM an application uses (type "top" without quotes in the terminal), you just can't allocate RAM to applications by yourself.</strong><hr></blockquote>



    Gawd I love un*ces. Top and ps are becoming universal.
  • Reply 10 of 18
    emaneman Posts: 7,204member
    [quote]Originally posted by Mr A J:

    <strong>EmAn: You can see how much RAM an application uses (type "top" without quotes in the terminal), you just can't allocate RAM to applications by yourself.</strong><hr></blockquote>



    Thanks. I didn't know that.
  • Reply 11 of 18
    I am stupid. How do you get root access once you open the app? <img src="graemlins/embarrassed.gif" border="0" alt="[Embarrassed]" />



    [ 02-04-2002: Message edited by: Macintosh ]</p>
  • Reply 12 of 18
    applenutapplenut Posts: 5,768member
    [quote]Originally posted by Macintosh:

    <strong>I am stupid. How do you get root access once you open the app? <img src="graemlins/embarrassed.gif" border="0" alt="[Embarrassed]" />



    [ 02-04-2002: Message edited by: Macintosh ]</strong><hr></blockquote>



    open what app?



    terminal? type su root

    or

    sudo root



    and then type in your password.



    if you haven't enabled root yet you need to go into the netinfo manager in your utilties folder and set it using that program. (enable root is under one of the menus)
  • Reply 13 of 18
    Just a nitpick, but I believe that 'sudo root' is a nonsensical command. 'sudo' means 'execute the following as root', and 'root' isn't a command.

    You can 'sudo' with just an admin password, but you need to activate the root account in NetInfo Manager to just plain 'su'. I believe.



    [ 02-04-2002: Message edited by: wyntir ]</p>
  • Reply 14 of 18
    thegeldingthegelding Posts: 3,230member
    EmAn sez:

    [quote]After looking at the pics... how do you live with The Dock that big? On a 15" LCD it seems kinda big.<hr></blockquote>



    ok...you are absouletly right (as usual)....but i'm just learning X...made dock smaller, added word, entourage, quark , quicken and iphoto to dock (which was very easy to do)....deleted mail and appleworks from dock, and turned hiding off but magnify on....this has allowed me to keep all icons off the desktop except the dock and the HD icon....much cleaner looking...plus i changed the background...will take a photo tonight and add it here....thanks for all the help and suggestions...g
  • Reply 15 of 18
    Why don't you put the sub-wooffer on the floor? <img src="confused.gif" border="0">
  • Reply 16 of 18
    personally, i don't like putting my computer to sleep. i either leave it on with the screen dimmed and running [email protected] as a screensaver--what geek am i-- (i have an ibook 600), or shut it off altogether.

    i've heard horror stories of what happens when a mac is put to sleep. (uh...i don't mean like what they do for dogs)

    my cousin's imac dv se had its hard drive totally broken due to constantly waking up and going into sleep. he had to spend 300 canadian bucks to had it replaced (to a 40 gig one, btw) by an authorized apple service provider.



    i'm not risking it

    ;p



    [ 02-07-2002: Message edited by: pismeov ]</p>
  • Reply 17 of 18
    [quote]Why don't you put the sub-wooffer on the floor? <hr></blockquote>



    1. like the way it looks on the desk

    2. i don't constantly kick it when i hyperactively swing my leg like a 6 yr old...and 3. it actually sounds better on the desk as it seems the rug on the floor dampins the sound, while the hard wood of the desk doesn't....g



    [quote]personally, i don't like putting my computer to sleep. i either leave it on with the screen dimmed and running [email protected] as a screensaver--what geek am i-- (i have an ibook 600), or shut it off altogether.

    i've heard horror stories of what happens when a mac is put to sleep <hr></blockquote>



    i've always heard that shuting down and powering up is harder on your system than sleep?? which is best, always on but sleeping when not in use, or turning on and off with each use???



    my old iMac i usually turned on and off, and that didn't seem to hurt it...with the new iMac i have been leaving it on and letting it sleep...either way is fine for me....a start up time of a minute isn't going to kill me vs the quicker time of coming out of sleep.....killing my HD would make me very unhappy though....g
  • Reply 18 of 18
    well...it depends.

    when i shut down my computer...it's off for a pretty long time...like overnight

    but during the day... it's permanently on.

    i don't like putting it to sleep because sometimes during....uh..naps, the hard drive spins down. when you wake it up, it spins up again. it's almost the equivalent of turning your computer off...and starting it up again. so to me, i prefer shutting it off altogether when i know i'm not using it. otherwise...i'll just leave it on with the screen dimmed and the processor set to slower.
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