Buying A Mac Direct From The US...

Posted:
in General Discussion edited January 2014
If one hypothetically bought a brand new Mac direct from the US and had it imported to their country of residence, what physically would be the difference from it, to the same model Mac bought in another country, i.e. Australia?



Just the power plug, or more?



I'm thinking that one could save thousands, this way... m.

Comments

  • Reply 1 of 10
    pbpb Posts: 4,234member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by Merovingian



    I'm thinking that one could save thousands, this way... m.




    When leaving the U.S. or entering your country, I think you have to declare it somewhere, no? And pay some taxes...
  • Reply 2 of 10
    talksense101talksense101 Posts: 1,737member
    Unless your country is part of the axis of evil or it has some trade restrictions with the US, the only thing you have to bother with is support for the product and taxes.



    p>s> It still cheap with all taxes paid.
  • Reply 3 of 10
    crazychestercrazychester Posts: 1,339member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by talksense101

    Unless your country is part of the axis of evil or it has some trade restrictions with the US, the only thing you have to bother with is support for the product and taxes.



    p>s> It still cheap with all taxes paid.




    Nope it's illegal to purchase a US Mac and bring it back into Oz under any circumstances (iPods might be OK). I have an email from Apple USA telling me so when I tried it a couple of years back (but not here sorry).



    While there may be ways around it, getting an iMac or G5 through customs without anybody noticing would be something of a challenge. And, personally, at this particular point in time I wouldn't even try it with a PB as they could well find it while looking for something else.



    Merovinginian email Apple USA yourself and see what they say. It seems the issue is one of legality not technical considerations but I can't remember the reasoning behind it.
  • Reply 4 of 10
    Merovingian,



    I bought an IBM Thinkpad in Canada a few years back whilst on vacation and didn't have any problems bringing it home (to England).



    Regarding technical issues, it depends on whether you're looking at a notebook or a desktop. Notebook's aren't a problem because the power adaptor should be universal (my IBM worked fine by switching the lead, but you could use an adaptor. I have a US ipod and it works fine in the UK). I'd figure desktops would be a bigger issue depending on where you are. If you live in an area with different voltage (i.e England), you would have to look into getting a voltage convertor/adaptor. Shouldn't be a problem but they can get pretty expensive.



    Legally, I guess it depends on where you live but I didn't have any problems bringing mine into England. Yes I should have declared it, but that would have doubled the price of the notebook. If you are able to purchase in the USA my advice would be to get rid of all the packaging and set up the notebook whilst in the US, so it looks used. Customs don't have any record of you taking it over there.



    And no I don't feel guilty for not paying any customs charges on my notebook, because technically it was a gift!
  • Reply 5 of 10
    satchmosatchmo Posts: 2,699member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by crazychester

    Nope it's illegal to purchase a US Mac and bring it back into Oz under any circumstances (iPods might be OK). I have an email from Apple USA telling me so when I tried it a couple of years back (but not here sorry).





    I'm not so sure about that.



    You may not be able to order directly from the U.S. and have it delivered to Australia, but I can't see why one can't buy a Mac in the U.S. (perhaps while on vacation or delivered to a relatives home) and take it with them wherever, freely.



    Isn't the product your personal property?
  • Reply 6 of 10
    Quote:

    Originally posted by satchmo

    I'm not so sure about that.



    You may not be able to order directly from the U.S. and have it delivered to Australia, but I can't see why one can't buy a Mac in the U.S. (perhaps while on vacation or delivered to a relatives home) and take it with them wherever, freely.



    Isn't the product your personal property?




    I would tend to agree. You just have to pay any customs or taxes for the purchase. I've been buying Macs between U.S. and Germany for a few years now.



    What I can't do is order it directly from Apple, U.S. I can buy it in the States and bring it back here to Germany. If the custom guys aren't paying attention, I have no issues.
  • Reply 7 of 10
    bka77bka77 Posts: 331member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by GardenOfEarthlyDelights

    ...I've been buying Macs between U.S. and Germany for a few years...







    I am thinking of doing that, but I am hesitant because of the different keyboard layout. Are you changing the keyboards?
  • Reply 8 of 10
    crazychestercrazychester Posts: 1,339member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by satchmo



    You may not be able to order directly from the U.S. and have it delivered to Australia, but I can't see why one can't buy a Mac in the U.S. (perhaps while on vacation or delivered to a relatives home) and take it with them wherever, freely.



    That's what I was trying to do - get a friend to buy it while she was in the US. Can't remember if Apple's reply distinguished between laptops and desktops but I was struck by the whole it's illegal thing. It related specifically to computers. Damn I wish I could get hold of that email to remind myself what it said.



    But yeah you wouldn't think they'd know with a laptop.
  • Reply 9 of 10
    zozo Posts: 3,115member
    dont worry.



    Customs are concerned when you bring back stuff that is still SEALED because you might re-sell it and the state wouldnt get the VAT, bla bla bla.



    If you buy anything anywhere and bring it through customs, but its opened and you are using it, they almost NEVER give you any problems.



    A few years back I used to buy digital cameras for friends in europe when I went back to the USA. I'd take all the digital cameras out of the boxes, fold boxes to bottom of suitcase, etc put the documentation in my backpack (along with receipts, guaranteees, etc), and then slip a digital camera here and there. I mean, it was at most 4 digital cameras at most... of which one was really mine. And anyway, these cameras didnt even have worldwide guarantees or whatnot. I probably saved a few hundred dollars for my friends back then.



    Regarding PowerBooks... I often calculate how much it costs in europe and compare in the USA. Almost ALWAYS I can SAVE MONEY by BUYING a ticket for NYC, picking up a PowerBook, and then coming back.



    Its about 255-300eur for a flight to NYC fyi.



    Isnt that ridiculous?



    Oh well, it enables me to go back home a couple days AND pick up a powerbook
  • Reply 10 of 10
    jwri004jwri004 Posts: 626member
    From some of the posts above you would think it was harder than robbing a bank!



    Quite simple:



    Go into store

    Buy laptop

    Buy laptop bag

    Take on airplane as carry on luggage

    Declare nothing



    I think the guys at customs have bigger issues to deal with, and reporting "illegal" shipments of one apple laptop is not high on the list.



    As far as other issues your power cord will have US plugs on it. You can either buy an adaptor, or apple has an international kit, or you can take a pair of pliers and bend the prongs so they will fit into your wall.



    Warranty is not an issue as it is a worldwide warranty. You may have to ring them to set it up as when you try to register online it wont recognise your serial number.



    You can also buy applecare for it as well. You can hold off and buy applecare later in Oz if you want. That the machine was bought in the US is irrelevant, but once again you will need to ring apple to register the product.
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