Has iTunes Music store changed your buying habits?

Posted:
in iPod + iTunes + AppleTV edited January 2014
I've always listened to music but havne't really bought a lot of music. I have a modest CD library of about 150-200 CDs. I did most of my listening on the radio.



I've started to buy a lot more music with the introduction of the ITMS -- at last check I had bought 168 songs (most of them singles) which is much more than I would normally spend in a year on music.



I've also stopped buying music on CD and now only buy my music at ITMS. How many people are also only shopping at ITMS and no longer visit the local record store?



I'm sure part of the reason I'm spending more money on music is because I also have an iPod. I got one as a gift from my sister for Christmas (very cool!!!) The iPod has really proven to be a great thing. I now spend a lot more time listeting to music and even got an iTrip so I could use it in the car.

Comments

  • Reply 1 of 20
    dmband0026dmband0026 Posts: 2,345member
    I'm more of a CD guy myself. I have thousands. I do buy some stuff off of the iTMS, but I still go for the CD most of the time (unless it's cheaper on the iTMS).
  • Reply 2 of 20
    homhom Posts: 1,098member
    Actually, when I got my iPod my music buying skyrocketed. Before the iPod I would listen to the same 50 CDs, but now I buy one or two albums a week either from iTMS or in person.
  • Reply 3 of 20
    wrong robotwrong robot Posts: 3,907member
    Yes, I buy a lot more music now. I never liked CDs much anyway.



    I haven't been to any record stores in a while, but I there are a couple albums I really want that are partial on iTMS, so I may have to take a trip down to just get the CD. too bad it'll be more expensive, and the CD will likely never be played.
  • Reply 4 of 20
    hmurchisonhmurchison Posts: 12,294member
    Now that I buy music on iTunes I get chicks like crazy!





    Actually what I find on iTunes is what I get on P2P even better actually. The ability to listen to music and get a sense for what a track is like. I've cashed in more than 20 caps now and over half are from artists that I didn't know of before iTunes.



    I'm not buying alot of full albums yet but that'll change in the future.
  • Reply 5 of 20
    bungebunge Posts: 7,329member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by briang5000

    I've always listened to music but havne't really bought a lot of music. I have a modest CD library of about 150-200 CDs. I did most of my listening on the radio.



    I think I've bought close to 60 CDs this week. I'm a sick ****.
  • Reply 6 of 20
    scavangerscavanger Posts: 286member
    I buy on average about 20 records (yes vinyl, fear the analouge goodness) (btw excuse spelling I'm somewhat drunk while writing this)



    I also pick up about 10 cds a month, mostly used for 7 bucks a pop. Perfect condition, and cheaper then iTunes.



    I can't see paying for a file. I won't buy software thats download only either, I feel if I pay money for something I should have a tangible product. Besides, I'm not that trust worthy in DVD or Hard Drives to store hunderds of dollars of music.



    And now to rip off an Apple switch campagin.



    My name is Scavanger, and I am a Pro DJ.
  • Reply 7 of 20
    johnqjohnq Posts: 2,763member
    I always hated CDs particularly juggling them, the stupid cases (which break) and superfluous album art. I have about 20 CDs at any given time, and hate CDs so much I usually treat them like crap and toss 'em.



    Since iTunes, I've imported all my CDs and now have bought perhaps 100 CDs worth of songs via iTunes. Never looked back.



    Now I make some backup CDs and they sit on a shelf gloriously untouched.



    I far prefer the pureness of focussing not on the media and decoration but the music itself.



    Now I wouldn't mind if iTunes had a lyrics browser and if you could buy music videos to go along with the music. But the covers and jackets I don't miss at all. Sucks for graphic designers I guess. Oh well they can still do t-shirts and computer desktop images.
  • Reply 8 of 20
    akumulatorakumulator Posts: 1,111member
    iTunes music store has sealed the deal with me as far as cds........ I will now only buy real cds. I tried to export some of my iTunes AAC songs to swf for internet streaming and it wouldn't let me. I don't like the limitations of iTunes music and actually prefer the real physical packaging of a cd. So, for now on..... I will buy the real thing. Thank you Apple for showing me the way.
  • Reply 9 of 20
    johnqjohnq Posts: 2,763member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by Akumulator

    iTunes music store has sealed the deal with me as far as cds........ I will now only buy real cds. I tried to export some of my iTunes AAC songs to swf for internet streaming and it wouldn't let me. I don't like the limitations of iTunes music (...) So, for now on..... I will buy the real thing. Thank you Apple for showing me the way.



    swf?? I won't ask...
  • Reply 10 of 20
    mac writemac write Posts: 289member
    My CD buying has skyrocketed thanks to the iTMS. I however wil never use it AIFF all the way. AAC is too limiting [B]NO ONE[/B} knows if it will be aorund in 10 years, where as AIFF will, or at least I will be able to convert my Music to anything from AIFF at that time (but I won't I am moving to only using AIFF within 18-24 momths).



    Also CD's are much cheaper then iTMS. 9 out of 10 CD's I buy are cheaperr then the Album on iTMS.
  • Reply 11 of 20
    akumulatorakumulator Posts: 1,111member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by johnq

    swf?? I won't ask...



    Shockwave.......Flash...... you never heard of it?



    Well, my problem with iTunes music store is that I purchase the music for nearly the same price as a normal cd and don't have any other options with it. I can only burn cds but can't export to any other format.
  • Reply 12 of 20
    thegeldingthegelding Posts: 3,230member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by Akumulator

    Shockwave.......Flash...... you never heard of it?



    Well, my problem with iTunes music store is that I purchase the music for nearly the same price as a normal cd and don't have any other options with it. I can only burn cds but can't export to any other format.




    well you can burn to cd ad then export that to any other format and them swf if you so desire...



    if i like 80% of the songs and the price is similar, i buy the cd at a store...if i like 80% of the songs on a cd and iTunes is much cheaper (2 bucks or more), i buy it on iTunes...if it is a classic cd (sticky fingers, revolver etc) i buy the cd at a store...



    i use iTunes to buy singles and to buy albums i find hard to get (feli kuti and such)...of the 530 songs i've bought at iTMS, about half are from albums and half are single...i use my iPod alot and i burn alot of collections for the car and i play music at my computer alot....so iTMS is wonderful for me...digital is likely the way to go and i see packaged cds slowly dying away as most people will have digital means of music in their computer, their cars, their portable devices...who wants to carry cds when you can have every song in something smaller??



    g



    edit...when computers connect to home audio wirelessly, physical, pre-packaged cd will become a niche market...then internet music stores will really take off and the current numbers will reverse (90% stores: 10% downloads to 90% downloads: 10% stores)
  • Reply 13 of 20
    keshkesh Posts: 621member
    I prefer CDs, for the most part, since I prefer higher bitrates and dont' want to spend all my time downloading music.



    However, for singles, iTMS is a lifesaver. I got a couple NIN tracks that were only available on movie soundtracks the other day. I hate buying an entire soundtrack for one song, since usually the other 11 or so tracks are stuff I don't care for. This makes it a lot easier to round out my collection.
  • Reply 14 of 20
    I don't forsee packaged CD's dying anytime soon. Thats what they said about vinyl when the compact disc came out, and its still here going strong. Vinyl won't be leaving us until aobut 2015. They still even make cassette tapes. I forsee CD's to last atleast 5 to 7 years, then be replaced by DVDA or SACD.



    The majority of music buyers, I would say, aren't computer people.
  • Reply 15 of 20
    johnqjohnq Posts: 2,763member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by Akumulator

    Shockwave.......Flash...... you never heard of it?





    Oh, I know what swf is. What do you mean by exporting "as" swf?? swf isn't a sound format. Do you mean it should build swf files with mp3 data already in them? Just the single oddest, obscure complaint of iTunes I've ever heard. It's not audio production software. You aren't even supposed to stream music without permission, why would Apple build that feature in?
  • Reply 16 of 20
    hmurchisonhmurchison Posts: 12,294member
    Quote:

    I forsee CD's to last atleast 5 to 7 years, then be replaced by DVDA or SACD.



    The majority of music buyers, I would say, aren't computer people.





    The latter point is spot on. CDs will last easily another 10 years. However I doubt that DVDA/SACD will escape their niche states for two primary reasons.



    1. Consumer don't really care about Multichannel audio or the higher bitrate



    2. Expense of media. If consumers don't like paying $12.99 for CDs what makes the industry think they'll cough up $16 on the average for hirez music. SACD/DVDA has another two years to take hold of they'll be in the dustbin of promising tech along with DCC/Minidisc and a bevvy of other forgotten tech.





    I think Digital Downloads will eventually match CD sales in 4-5 years. Storing DVDS/CD/VHS and the like take up space and eventually consumers will ask themselves why are they juggling physical media. Sure I like getting the booklet and liner notes but hell I don't have all day to read that information. Just gimme the music.



    I do think that iTMS will need to up the quality. I'd like to see 160 VBR for that extra bit of insurance that I'm buying a transparent recording.



    CDs are going to diminish. The more broadband connections and home networks that are created the more people will realize that digital files are better and easier managaged. It's really a no brainer here and the industry has been slow as molasses to respond appropriately beyone suing people.
  • Reply 17 of 20
    eugeneeugene Posts: 8,254member
    I buy most of the big label stuff from iTunes, though I've just been exposed to a site called Magnatunes.



    - Indie artists

    - No DRM

    - File format of your choosing, including various lossless codecs

    - You choose your price per album, starting at $5. $8 recommended.

    - 50% goes directly to the artist

    - Music redownloadable

    - Music distributed under the Creative Commons license

    - Anonymous purchasing possible...no account set-up, no e-mail registration



    That's no way to run a business.
  • Reply 18 of 20
    cubs23cubs23 Posts: 324member
    yeah, changed my ways. I don't do illegal anymore. 1.) iTMS is so easy, it is not bad spending 99¢. 2.) Respect for artist's work. 3.) Even though Macs are 3% of market, not worth the risk to pay the RIAA. Took awhile for my siblings to understand why to pay when you could get it for free, but for me it basically came down to respect for the work and morals. (Stealing is Stealing)
  • Reply 19 of 20
    pscatespscates Posts: 5,847member
    Well, I have to say that iTunes, in general, has changed EVERYTHING about how I play and listen to music. About two years ago, I started encoding all my CDs because it dawned on me how neat it was to have all my stuff right there, easily accessible. I honestly credit iTunes with getting me BACK into music again, because prior to iTunes, I had this 300-plus CD collection but just hated the whole "scan my shelf and find the one I want, put it on, etc." thing. I was getting to where I wasn't listening to music, just because I didn't dig the hassle of it all. Now music has become a HUGE part of my life again: during work, at home, while surfing, working on freelance projects, relaxing and doing a crossword, etc.







    Well, starting last April, the iTMS did for my acquisition of music what iTunes - the software - did for my listening/enjoyment of it.



    So yes, I can't remember the last time I went to Tower, Sam Goody, etc. or even ventured to the CD section at Target or whatever. I honestly believe that I've bought my last $15.99 retail CD.



    I certainly did the Napster/Macster thing about 4 years ago, and flirted for a few weeks with LimeWire (but it sucked so bad, I honestly don't think I got much from it).



    But the iTMS is great. I buy singles and known songs and hidden treasures and childhood/teen memories and one-hit wonders and all kinds of cool stuff. And if it happens to be 3am, so what?



    Instant gratification. I'm not cheating anyone and I get WHAT I want, WHEN I want.



    I just need to get an iPod, to complete the circle.
  • Reply 20 of 20
    hmurchisonhmurchison Posts: 12,294member
    Well said Paul. Mirrors what I'm going through as well. You know I'd like Apple to offer the option of 45 second pieces. There are some songs like Classical or other that could really use another 15 seconds to flesh out what they're about.



    I love it. Great for cross over hits because I don't have to buy the whole album if I like one song from a particular album. THe artist gets paid..I get the song. Win/win.



    Things will be even better one there are a million songs. The next battle will be how to get people to new and fresh music.
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