Your largest jump in performance

Posted:
in General Discussion edited January 2014
Hello all. I was just wandering what was you largest jump in performance. I just went from a Lombard PowerBook (400 Mhz G3) to a Dual 1.8 G5 (rev. A).

I must say that it is damn nice to be able to run all the apps that I've wanted to run for the past few years.
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Comments

  • Reply 1 of 39
    concordconcord Posts: 312member
    Commodore Vic 20 to an Amiga 2000!



    At least that felt like the biggest jump in performance - it was like a whole new world... 8)





    Cheers,



    C.
  • Reply 2 of 39
    durandaldurandal Posts: 277member
    Hmm... guess 't was the upgrade from a Performa 5200/75 (PPC 603, 75Mhz) to the original iMac (G3, 233Mhz)...
  • Reply 3 of 39
    andersanders Posts: 6,523member
    Vic 20 -> Pismo 400
  • Reply 4 of 39
    Apple IIe -> Turbo IBM PC(12MHZ)
  • Reply 5 of 39
    a_greera_greer Posts: 4,594member
    biggest upgrade for me:



    from: IBM pc intel 80286 2mb ram 20MB(for those who are too young to remember those were megabytes, 1/1000 of a gigabyte) HDD and dos 4-ish(I think)

    to: Compaq piss-ario(my pet name for it, it broke a lot) intel pent 150 mhz 16 megs of ram, 2.5 gb hdd and windows 95 rev a



    ok so the os crashed more but it was faster when it worked...
  • Reply 6 of 39
    mattyjmattyj Posts: 898member
    First mac:



    iMac rev.a 233Mhz

    160MB RAM

    4MB Rage II graphics

    4GB Hard drive



    To my currenct mac

    Powermac G4 Dual 1Ghz DDR

    1GB RAM

    128MB GF4Ti

    80GB + 20GB Hard drives.



    Quite a leap, my imac couldn't play quake at 1024x768!
  • Reply 7 of 39
    splinemodelsplinemodel Posts: 7,311member
    Radio Shack Tandy with 256k RAM



    to



    PM 8500/132 with 80MB RAM
  • Reply 8 of 39
    a_greera_greer Posts: 4,594member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by Splinemodel

    Radio Shack Tandy with 256k RAM



    to



    PM 8500/132 with 80MB RAM




    Tandy
  • Reply 9 of 39
    gongon Posts: 2,437member
    All my computer upgrades (386->486->PentiumII->Duron) have roughly quadrupled both processor performance and memory, except the last one, which was from a 800MHz Duron to 1.33GHz Powerbook. Smallest upgrade ever in computing speed terms.
  • Reply 10 of 39
    Stream This, I'll take your Lombard and downgrade it to a Wallstreet 266. I also got a rev A DP 1.8.



    To make the jump even better, I had been running the PB with a broken hinge (propped against the wall) and a power cord that would only work if plugged in the back "just so".



    Of course, 8.6 hummed right along with 128 megs of RAM, but that 4 gig HD was sure getting small...
  • Reply 11 of 39
    johnqjohnq Posts: 2,763member
    Going from 4300 RPM drive to a 7200 PRM drive with my iBook.



    Sooooooo much of Mac OS X's perceived slowness (especially on the G3s) is due to slow disk drives.



    Even my iMac DV SE is a speed demon now.



    Man, I wish I could go 10 or 15k RPM!!!!!



  • Reply 12 of 39
    gongon Posts: 2,437member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by johnq

    Going from 4300 RPM drive to a 7200 PRM drive with my iBook.



    Sooooooo much of Mac OS X's perceived slowness (especially on the G3s) is due to slow disk drives.



    Even my iMac DV SE is a speed demon now.




    How much memory do you have on the most affected machines? (trying to figure out if the benefit comes from "normal" access speedup or virtual memory speedup)
  • Reply 13 of 39
    resres Posts: 711member
    My largest jump was going from an Apple IIgs (65C816 processor running at 2.8MHz on a 1 MHz bus) to a Macintosh IIci (MC68030 CPU running at 25 MHz plus a 68882 FPU al running on a mighty 25MHz bus).
  • Reply 14 of 39
    johnqjohnq Posts: 2,763member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by Gon

    How much memory do you have on the most affected machines? (trying to figure out if the benefit comes from "normal" access speedup or virtual memory speedup)



    768 on the iBook and 1GB on the iMac DV SE, so yeah it helps. Less disk access and, when it is accessed, much faster at 7200RPM.



    Kinda sad that Apple could dramatically increase the default performance by upping the supplied RAM (I mean prior to BTO) and hard disk speeds. If Apple could manage to ship iBooks and iMacs with 512 or 768 for RAM and up the drives to 7200 RPM, most casual users would think they are running G5s



    I mean that for 99% of the casual users that don't bother upping the RAM (and certainly don't install their own faster drives) it'd be a nice treat to give them the added performance. Not sure how it'd price out (assuming Apple could do so cheaper than now if they were to do it across the board).



    It is all relative though, I know that they are still pokey compared to a G5 with 4GB of RAM and 10,000 RPM drives...but still.



    Both of my Macs were out of warrantee so I felt brave enough to bump the drives up past what was suggested, although the iMac might get too hot if I ever do anything severely HDD intensive.
  • Reply 15 of 39
    mac voyermac voyer Posts: 1,283member
    Dial-up to broadband.
  • Reply 16 of 39
    performa 6300 to a quicksilver 867 had to buckle into my seat before i pressed the on button
  • Reply 17 of 39
    placeboplacebo Posts: 5,767member
    G3/300 running OS X to a G5 1.8 running OS X. I was frickin ELATED.
  • Reply 18 of 39
    powerdocpowerdoc Posts: 8,123member
    the biggest jump was my first mac an apple 2 vi (68 030 without math coprocessor at 16 mhz) to an powermac G3 333 mhz. 20 more times the mhz, 4 generations of difference for the CPU ...

    The difference was terrific.



    The second jump was between this G3 and my dual G5. But the difference was less important ...
  • Reply 19 of 39
    Original Mac to Mac SE.

    What's a HARD DRIVE?

    You mean I don't have to have a floppy drive for the program and another one for the data. COOL!
  • Reply 20 of 39
    jlljll Posts: 2,709member
    From a IIci to a Power Mac 9500/132
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