Proxy

Posted:
in macOS edited January 2014
I am trying to learn how to setup a proxy. My google results lead me to campus stuff so is there anyone here who can share some info? 10.3, A link would be fine as well. Thx

Comments

  • Reply 1 of 17
    xdedxded Posts: 41member
    Typical
  • Reply 2 of 17
    nothingnothing Posts: 23member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by XdEd

    Typical



    Well... I might recommend Squid.... it's at:



    http://www.squid-cache.org/





    You're going to have to compile and configure it - so that will require some UNIX knowledge.... but it's free. If you don't know how to use a shell, well - then consider that to be the cost of the software - which is still free as in beer, but not as in brain cells



    Hope that helps!
  • Reply 3 of 17
    nothingnothing Posts: 23member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by XdEd

    Typical



    Oops... looking at a great site dedicated to all things OS X Server / used as a server... it seems that the source needs a small change for it to compile correctly.



    Here's their article... this might have been fixed by now, since this article is slightly out of date....



    http://www.afp548.com/Articles/workbench/squid.html



    I would try the 2.5 stable or the 3.0 devel first, and then if it fails to compile, try the fix listed.



    Good Luck!
  • Reply 4 of 17
    Quote:

    Originally posted by nothing

    Oops... looking at a great site dedicated to all things OS X Server / used as a server... it seems that the source needs a small change for it to compile correctly.



    Here's their article... this might have been fixed by now, since this article is slightly out of date....



    http://www.afp548.com/Articles/workbench/squid.html



    I would try the 2.5 stable or the 3.0 devel first, and then if it fails to compile, try the fix listed.



    Good Luck!




    That patch is old news, 2.5 will compile cleanly. If you are looking to proxy on your own machine, have a look at http://www.privoxy.org as well. If you plan to filter urls, then http://www.squidguard.org is a great redirector.
  • Reply 5 of 17
    1337_5l4xx0r1337_5l4xx0r Posts: 1,558member
    Before compiling anything, what is it you hope to achieve with a proxy? There are many proxies for many occasions.



    Elaborate.
  • Reply 6 of 17
    xdedxded Posts: 41member
    Its a simple matter of privacy.
  • Reply 7 of 17
    1337_5l4xx0r1337_5l4xx0r Posts: 1,558member
    Elaborate. Privacy? Are you talking filtration of cookies? Blocking of ad banners? Hiding requests of several machines behind one central proxy? All of the above?
  • Reply 8 of 17
    xdedxded Posts: 41member
    I like the idea of being able to control within reason who sees my ip address, or at least make it a little less obvious. Specifically, I recently visited a random web site that showed my IP address, the browser I was using and even My ISP. I dont really mind about 95% of the time but every once in awhile it would be nice.
  • Reply 9 of 17
    dobbydobby Posts: 794member
    A proxy won't stop all that.



    You can't block your internet ip address. The ISP has a fixed range of ip addresses to use and you can find out what the range is by doing a lookup of the ip on whois or other site.



    Dobby.
  • Reply 10 of 17
    enderender Posts: 353member
    Unless I've misunderstood how a proxy works, you need to have a proxy running on some other machine (preferrably on another network) for it to have the desired effect.



    So you'd have your machine A

    Then you'd have a proxy on machine B

    Then you have the webserver (or whatever else you're connecting to) on machine C



    With this setup, here's what would happen when you requested a webpage:

    You type the URL in your browser on machine A

    A sends the request to your proxy on B

    B sends the request to the webserver on C

    C sees the IP information of machine B, and doesn't even know that machine A exists

    C sends the html (or whatever) that you requested back to B

    B sends the information back to A and you see the result



    You *could* have the proxy on your machine or on another machine in your network, but it would defeat the purpose entirely. The ideal solution is to have a machine that nobody but you has access to on somebody else's network. I'm gonna go out on a limb here and say that this would be expensive. Another way is to pony up the monthly fee and subscribe to one of the anonymous web proxy sites. You can find em using google. Just make sure that they will respect your privacy, because it would probably be worse for your proxy to sell your surfing habits than for each individual site you go to to know that you were there. Another thing is to make sure that the data between you and the proxy is encrypted or at least obfuscated to some degree. Otherwise your ISP can still see the pages that you're requesting.



    Probably the easiest (and cheapest) is to just not go to sites that you wouldn't want people to know about in the first place.



    Hope that helps somewhat,

    -Ender
  • Reply 11 of 17
    xdedxded Posts: 41member
    You have misunderstood at least the intent. I am not trying to hide from the ISP. Thx for the tips I will try them out and post results.
  • Reply 12 of 17
    1337_5l4xx0r1337_5l4xx0r Posts: 1,558member
    1. a) The IP address shown will be the proxy's, but if it is on your network there really is little point.



    1. b) If the proxy is remote and you are accessing it, it is wide open to hackers, and believe me, they will exploit your open relay for malicious purposes.



    2. Your browser will still be traceable, as that functionality is built into the web browser itself. You can 'spoof' other browsers, but why bother?



    3. Your ISP will always be traceable.



    It sounds to me like you are looking for anonymizer.com, but unless you are looking at child porn, again, there's really little point. There's also many questions about how anonymous anonymizer is.



    The internet is traceable, dude, there's no way around it. It's all about sending packets from a to b, so obviously a and b can be determined.
  • Reply 13 of 17
    xdedxded Posts: 41member
    Dude, I am not interested in hiding from any ISP as I clearly stated in the post above yours and once again here. Hope its clear, thx for the posts.
  • Reply 14 of 17
    kickahakickaha Posts: 8,760member
    Dude, you're missing the point.



    Say you set up the proxy on your network. It has IP address A. Your machine has IP address B.



    Your ISP had to have given you both A *and* B in the first place, so anyone who goes to your ISP and asks for the person who owns A will be given your name *anyway*. You can't just make up an IP, you know, you have to get it from somewhere in the first place.



    This isn't hiding from your ISP, just trying to point out that even your proxy IP address will be tied to your name/account through your ISP.



    ie, you haven't gained a bloody thing.



    Unless you're explicitly spoofing your IP, which is illegal, you're traceable. Just a fact of life on the Internet.



    Your browser info can be set to whatever you want, as stated above, but that can cause headaches when a site thinks you're running IE, so it sends you IE-specific code, when you're really running Safari.
  • Reply 15 of 17
    xdedxded Posts: 41member
    Doesn't a website have to actually perform a trace to determine if someone is using a proxy. See I couldn't care less about the ISP. I was interested in a particular site that says ok IP # so and so is visiting. With a proxy enabled wouldnt that site only see the proxy #? At least without doing a trace? Thats all I was trying to do.
  • Reply 16 of 17
    Wouldn't NAT on your router give you what you want?
  • Reply 17 of 17
    xdedxded Posts: 41member
    I Forgot to check back. I figured it out weeks ago but, I used none of these tips thx for your feedback though. There is a much simpler way that I have found.
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