Sprint PCS Bluetooth phones?

Posted:
in iPod + iTunes + AppleTV edited January 2014
i just killed my sanyo 8100 and am going to have to get a replacement. are there still no bluetooth options for sprint?

Comments

  • Reply 1 of 13
    regreg Posts: 832member
    The only current phone for sprint that supports blue tooth is the Treo 600 by palmone. Then you still have to get the integrated SD/MMC card. At least Sprint has one phone listed. Verizon does not support any.



    reg
  • Reply 2 of 13
    applenutapplenut Posts: 5,768member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by reg

    The only current phone for sprint that supports blue tooth is the Treo 600 by palmone. Then you still have to get the integrated SD/MMC card. At least Sprint has one phone listed. Verizon does not support any.



    reg




    bleh.



    what's taking so long with implementing bluetooth in cell phones here. it's been years now since the first ones were released and it's still few and far between.
  • Reply 3 of 13
    savvysavvy Posts: 1member
    Actually, Sprint has the Sony Ericson T608 available, and it has bluetooth. My friend has one and it works great. The catch is that you have to call Sprint Automotive and tell them that you want to buy a T608. It was 199 and arrived in one or two days I think. He had no problems, as its actually a Sprint phone and they just moved his phone service from his old phone to the T608. I don't have the number but I know he found it on one of the websites dedicated to that phone
  • Reply 4 of 13
    sroachsroach Posts: 105member
    I have the Sony Ericsson T608 and I love it, as soon as I powered it up my Powerbook saw it. I paired the two devices and iSync went to work. It's awesome.



    I have the Sony Ericsson HBH-65 bluetooth headset for it and am having lots of luck with it.



    One thing I don't like it the battery life, it's a little short, I am going to buy a extended life 3rd party battery and give it a try.



    Everything I bough was from e-bay and had NO TROUBLE turning on the new phone.



    OS X's built in bluetooth support makes this a great phone I can send Pictures, Themes, and Game to my phone with the built in bluetooth file transfer.
  • Reply 5 of 13
    f1turbof1turbo Posts: 252member
    Don't think the Treo 600 supports bluetooth--check out Treocentral.com for the "Bluetooth bounty" for info. I'm waiting for the new Treo Ace with Bluetooth, hopefully out by Sep or Oct this year.
  • Reply 6 of 13
    dstranathandstranathan Posts: 1,717member
    Rumor: There might be a Treo 610 with BT inside.
  • Reply 7 of 13
    geobegeobe Posts: 235member
    you are are not going to like this answer, but here is why cell carriers aren't carring bluetooth.



    They want to sell access minutes!!!



    If you have a bluetooth phone with unlimited mintutes and an ISP with unlimited access plan,then all you have to do is use your laptop to connect to your phone and you are unlimited......



    They don't want this, they want you to sync with their address book so you tend to say with them. They want you to use there minutes, especially with faster wireless connections coming to a carrier near you.



    Since carriers get to certify and ultimatly choose which manufacturer's and which phones run on their networks, they have all the control.



    It is sad, but if cell phones continue to crush the PDA and they don't pick up bluetooth, bluetooth might be in trouble.



    Acura, Saab and Sony Ericsson cannot carry the weight alone.
  • Reply 8 of 13
    applenutapplenut Posts: 5,768member
    don't really understand that. but ok





    well, do any of them sync up with isync via USB?
  • Reply 9 of 13
    geobegeobe Posts: 235member
    allow me to try and explain again.



    Here are some items you needs to understand first.



    1) Cell carriers and phone manufacturers all have exclusive agreements. (ie, LG, Samsung and some others are run off sprint, almost exclusively), Most of Nextel is all Motorola, most of At&T is sony ericsson.



    2) carriers dictate which phones will be allowed on their network.



    3) carriers have major influence on cell phone manufacturers because if they don't want a phone on the network, the encentive for creating a certain phone or building certain feature in a phone is nearly non-existant.



    4) Cell carriers want to sell you data minutes and high prices.



    5) Bluetooth features go beyond just sync. Bluetooth can allow you to wirelessly connect your laptop to your cell phone. Once you have establised the connection between the laptop and the cell phone, one can open up the connection manager and dial your ISP's local phone number for your particular area.

    **********



    If you have an internet access account with unlimited access and an easy way to connect it to your computer, ala bluetooth, you have an easy and often used method to connect to the internet.



    If you have a "nights & weekend" plan through you cell carrier then you can connect through your phone... to your ISP account and surf all weekend long without paying dime over your normal ISP and Phone minimum package costs.



    CARRIERS DO NOT WANT THIS. They want you to pay by-the-minute for your data usage. If you have bluetooth, then you have a totally mobile, always accessible, easy way to do whatever it is you need to do. In concept, the carriers want you do feel you can be connected, they just want you to pay them for the extra minutes instead of your ISP.



    Make sense now?
  • Reply 10 of 13
    dfilerdfiler Posts: 3,420member
    The ironic thing is that cell phones already have a worldwide wireless data connection build in. Bluetooth obviously has some differences in the connection it offers. However, most gadget-heads with BT cell phones also have always-on internet connections.



    What the cell market is really needs are easy to use, built in, data syncing services. Why is it that phones offer mp3 ring tones, cameras, and color screens yet cannot transfer a few k of information over the net?



    I think the real answer is that the communications industry is filled with slow moving giants. Why else would we not have phone book access on our mobile phones yet? It seems like a phone book would be the most useful feature after one's personal phone number list. In other words... don't hold your breath on BT, the phone industry doesn't seem to be playing directly to consumer needs.
  • Reply 11 of 13
    wmfwmf Posts: 1,164member
    I think the problem is simpler than that. Virtually all CDMA (Sprint/Verizon) phones use Qualcomm chipsets. Qualcomm thought that Bluetooth would never take off, so they didn't support it in their chipsets. Oops.
  • Reply 12 of 13
    I don't buy all this "they don't want you to connect" BS. If customers demanded bluetooth phones, they would ship them...it's that simple. The problem is most people don't even know what bluetooth is. Windows doesn't have good bluetooth support so the drones aren't very impressed by it. An otherwise tech savvy colleague of mine asked me the other day, "What in the hell is this bluenose thing that Apple keeps talking about?



    The good thing is that nearly every well-designed phone does have bluetooth.



    I just got a new plan with T-Mobile with unlimited GPRS data for 19.99 and 3000 voice minutes for $49.99. I couldn't be happier. Does Sprint even have a GPRS network? That whole "all digital from the ground up" thing is kind of a joke now. T-Mobile, At&t, and Cingular all share GSM/GPRS towers and satellites...now that's a network.
  • Reply 13 of 13
    applenutapplenut Posts: 5,768member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by Michael Wilkie

    I don't buy all this "they don't want you to connect" BS. If customers demanded bluetooth phones, they would ship them...it's that simple. The problem is most people don't even know what bluetooth is. Windows doesn't have good bluetooth support so the drones aren't very impressed by it. An otherwise tech savvy colleague of mine asked me the other day, "What in the hell is this bluenose thing that Apple keeps talking about?



    The good thing is that nearly every well-designed phone does have bluetooth.



    I just got a new plan with T-Mobile with unlimited GPRS data for 19.99 and 3000 voice minutes for $49.99. I couldn't be happier. Does Sprint even have a GPRS network? That whole "all digital from the ground up" thing is kind of a joke now. T-Mobile, At&t, and Cingular all share GSM/GPRS towers and satellites...now that's a network.






    I'm probably gonna go with the Sanyo 8200. New version of my previous phone.





    They have a CDMA network so no. They get the best reception in the two areas I frequent and my family and gf are all on sprint so I just use the PCS-PCS free mins and it works well.
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