Interesting news headline re: AMD and dual-core...

Posted:
in Future Apple Hardware edited January 2014
AMD Demonstrates World's First x86 Dual-Core Processor



http://biz.yahoo.com/bw/040831/305770_1.html



Of course, there's a big difference between sampling chips and mass producing them, but this is quite promising.

Comments

  • Reply 1 of 7
    hmurchisonhmurchison Posts: 12,225member
    Marketing.



    Can anyone get AMD to shutup about anything nowadays. According to reliable rumors Apple already has dual core chips for sampling. No need to have a press release and pat yourself on the back too hard. By end of 2005 everyone should be shipping dual core options. It's ok for AMD to get some mindshare but mass produce and ship first please.
  • Reply 2 of 7
    chagichagi Posts: 284member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by hmurchison

    Marketing.



    Can anyone get AMD to shutup about anything nowadays. According to reliable rumors Apple already has dual core chips for sampling. No need to have a press release and pat yourself on the back too hard. By end of 2005 everyone should be shipping dual core options. It's ok for AMD to get some mindshare but mass produce and ship first please.




    Well, I understand where you're coming from, but I wouldn't really be so quick to bash AMD. I personally think that the sheer quantity of press releases that some companies put out can be a bit annoying at times, but as a publicly traded company, they generally have to ensure that they are supplying full disclosure to the public.



    That said, AMD has been executing very well for the past couple of years, and I think that we are going to see them begin to truly make significant marketshare progress vs. Intel. Just look at some of the recent released figures for shipped Opteron-based systems, and you'll see that AMD is finally starting to make a serious dent in the backrooms of corporate IT. The company is looking better and better long-term financially, and if they can beat Intel to shiping dual-core processors, things are going to get very interesting next year.
  • Reply 3 of 7
    onlookeronlooker Posts: 5,252member
    It';s funny how they all go Ooooo, and Ahhh , but hasn't IBM been selling dual core Power CPU's for a while already? I may be mistaken.
  • Reply 4 of 7
    chagichagi Posts: 284member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by onlooker

    It';s funny how they all go Ooooo, and Ahhh , but hasn't IBM been selling dual core Power CPU's for a while already? I may be mistaken.



    I think that's correct, but the huge difference here is the pricepoint. We're going to be seeing dual-core chips at a consumer pricepoint in about a year, and workstation/server chips even sooner. Going to be really, really interesting to see how they bench.



    The other interesting thing is that apparently the Opteron/Athlon 64 cores were designed from the beginning with dual-core in mind for future revisions, the "hooks" are essentially already there, whereas Intel is apparently being forced to essentially go back to the drawing board with their designs.
  • Reply 5 of 7
    hmurchisonhmurchison Posts: 12,225member
    Naturally.



    Intel is always doing things ass backward. Both AMD and IBM will be able to move to dual core easily. The 970 is a POWER4 lite with one core. Shouldn't be too hard to tack that second core back on.
  • Reply 6 of 7
    thttht Posts: 3,110member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by Chagi

    That said, AMD has been executing very well for the past couple of years, and I think that we are going to see them begin to truly make significant marketshare progress vs. Intel.



    I don't. Intel will always be able to counterpunch.
  • Reply 7 of 7
    amorphamorph Posts: 7,112member
    I have to agree with THT. Intel did end up chasing the big-hot-core model a bit far, but all that means is that (as with 64-bit) their competitors have a window of opportunity.



    Don't forget the Pentium M. Intel certainly hasn't. It's relatively cool, relatively small, pretty easy to evolve into a multicore design. The major obstacle to the acceptance of a multicore CPU on Windows will be that platform's dearth of multithreaded applications, and Windows' own lackluster threading performance, which has actually gotten worse over time as far as I've been able to discern. But when Apple went to dual processors, developers started threading. I don't see why it would go differently on the x86 side, especially if AMD was also shipping dual core CPUs.



    The key here is for AMD (and IBM, and Freescale) to get as much as they can out of the time before Intel counterpunches.
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