Roxio Popcorn - Do I Need It?

Posted:
in Mac Software edited January 2014
I've been using DVD Backup and DVD2oneX for the last few months to backup my DVD collection.



Does Popcorn offer any advantages over my current system? The Roxio site claims impressive compression results, but is it noticably better than DVD2oneX?

Comments

  • Reply 1 of 20
    r3dx0rr3dx0r Posts: 201member
    looks like you don't. i haven't tried it myself but there are a few reader reviews at accelerate your mac which tend to be quite accurate.
  • Reply 2 of 20
    No, Roxio Popcorn does not offer any advantage based on what you have been doing. I was using (still use) DVD2OneX to backup my DVD's. If your DVD is CSS Encrypted (which is like 99.9% of the DVD's you buy at Best Buy) Popcorn will not work. It does not have the ability to decode the CSS. So in my opinion Popcorn is the biggest waste of time and money until they get that ability. Once they have that I think it will be the best DVD Backup application on the planet, better then Fast DVD Copy (which hardly ever works right for me).
  • Reply 3 of 20
    jlljll Posts: 2,709member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by O4BlackWRX

    No, Roxio Popcorn does not offer any advantage based on what you have been doing. I was using (still use) DVD2OneX to backup my DVD's. If your DVD is CSS Encrypted (which is like 99.9% of the DVD's you buy at Best Buy) Popcorn will not work. It does not have the ability to decode the CSS. So in my opinion Popcorn is the biggest waste of time and money until they get that ability.



    Neither does DVD2oneX. If you don't have DTOX, Popcorn is cheaper.
  • Reply 4 of 20
    wilcowilco Posts: 985member
    Thanks for the input.



    Just to be clear, I use DVD Backup to strip away the CSS and Region-coding info, and then DVD2oneX to compress (if necessary).



    My question was whether Popcorn offered any features not found in DVD2oneX -- and it seems like the answer is no.
  • Reply 5 of 20
    From what I understand, Popcorn is meant to be a two-in-one solution. With DVD2OneX you'll still need to launch either Disk Utility or Toast to burn. Popcorn is supposed to do this built in. Maybe it bothers some to have to launch Toast, but it was never a big deal to me.



    Based on the feedback I've read DVD2OneX still seems to be the better option. Popcorn is missing features like specifying audio tracks or video chapters to include/strip.
  • Reply 6 of 20
    idunnoidunno Posts: 645member
    What do you mean by "back up" your dvd collection? Do you really mean rip rented dvd's to your hard drive?



    Why would you back up your dvd's?



    iDunno.
  • Reply 7 of 20
    wilcowilco Posts: 985member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by iDunno

    What do you mean by "back up" your dvd collection? Do you really mean rip rented dvd's to your hard drive?



    Why would you back up your dvd's?



    iDunno.




    Why does anyone need to back-up their DVDs/CDs/Application Disks? To keep the originals from getting f'ed up.

  • Reply 8 of 20
    kcmackcmac Posts: 1,051member
    My brother and I experimented with Popcorn recently. I can see how it would be good to have copies of certain DVD's that our young daughter and her friends watch over and over. The movies start instantly with no selections or warnings. That is nice.



    Otherwise, I don't know why you would need to back up a movie DVD. We have a lot of movies and we watch them only occasionally. We usually buy them for $7-$8 each at BlockBuster and you get all of the extras plus a DVD case and artwork.



    We found it took about 30 minutes to get rid of the protection stuff using mac the ripper. Then it took popcorn about 45 minutes to compress the file and then write it to disk. (iMac G5).



    Until Popcorn could do it all in one step (third party plug in?) I would have much better things to do with my time.
  • Reply 9 of 20
    wilcowilco Posts: 985member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by kcmac





    Otherwise, I don't know why you would need to back up a movie DVD. We have a lot of movies and we watch them only occasionally. We usually buy them for $7-$8 each at BlockBuster and you get all of the extras plus a DVD case and artwork.




    I'm glad your system works for you.



    However, many of my DVDs are either out of print, imports, or more expensive than something you'd pick up used at Blockbuster (i.e. Criterion Collection DVDs). I need a back-up because many of my DVDs simply cannot be replaced, or would be prohibitively expensive to do so.



    Obviously there's a need for such software, or Roxio wouldn't have gone through the trouble of creating software to address it.
  • Reply 10 of 20
    keshkesh Posts: 621member
    Here's a simple question: suppose I stick a DVD in my Powerbook and use Disk Utility to make a bit-by-bit disc image. Can I then burn that image to a DVD-R, even though the original was CSS encrypted?



    I ask, because I bought a cheap set of werewolf movies on DVD... but they're dual-sided discs. I can't stand dual sided discs, since they're more likely to get damaged than normal ones. So, I'd like to break all four movies onto four seperate DVDs (instead of the two double-siders they're on now).
  • Reply 11 of 20
    kcmackcmac Posts: 1,051member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by wilco

    I'm glad your system works for you.



    However, many of my DVDs are either out of print, imports, or more expensive than something you'd pick up used at Blockbuster (i.e. Criterion Collection DVDs). I need a back-up because many of my DVDs simply cannot be replaced, or would be prohibitively expensive to do so.



    Obviously there's a need for such software, or Roxio wouldn't have gone through the trouble of creating software to address it.




    Hope you don't think I was insinuating anything about your needs. You clearly have different ones than me and it's all good.
  • Reply 12 of 20
    rhoqrhoq Posts: 190member
    I have been using DVD Backup and DVD2OneX as well. I have Popcorn, but I haven't felt the need to the try it out yet.



    Anyways to answer the "Why would need to backup your DVD collection?" question: Convenience and peace of mind.



    I have a decent sized DVD collection. Friends are always asking to borrow movies. I find it easier to burn copies than to lend out the orginal disc. This way I don't have to worry about the disc getting damaged or lost, plus I still have the original in case I want to watch it instead of waiting until it's returned to me.
  • Reply 13 of 20
    rokrok Posts: 3,519member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by iDunno

    What do you mean by "back up" your dvd collection? Do you really mean rip rented dvd's to your hard drive?



    Why would you back up your dvd's?



    iDunno.




    well, considering how easy it is to scratch the surface of a DVD (still one drawback compared to the nigh-impenetrable plastic-doored house of a vhs cassette), having digital copies of DVDs is a good idea, especially with how cheap hard drive space is getting these days.



    of course, the riaa doesn't want you to EVER make backups of your own, purchased work, because you might give it to someone else. so your child ran your out-of-print dvd over the floor? too bad. fork over the cash for a replacement.
  • Reply 14 of 20
    brussellbrussell Posts: 9,812member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by Kesh

    Here's a simple question: suppose I stick a DVD in my Powerbook and use Disk Utility to make a bit-by-bit disc image. Can I then burn that image to a DVD-R, even though the original was CSS encrypted?



    I ask, because I bought a cheap set of werewolf movies on DVD... but they're dual-sided discs. I can't stand dual sided discs, since they're more likely to get damaged than normal ones. So, I'd like to break all four movies onto four seperate DVDs (instead of the two double-siders they're on now).




    Probably not, but it's easy enough to strip the copy protection with something like DVDBackup.
  • Reply 15 of 20
    No you cann't just make an image of the DVD and burn the image. YOu need to use something to decode the CSS encryption, something like MacTheRipper, and then use DVD2OneX to compress it, and lastly burn it with something like Roxio Toast Titanium.
  • Reply 16 of 20
    keshkesh Posts: 621member
    Actually, I tried using Disk Utility to do this last night... and it worked.



    I had it create a 'DVD/CD Master' of my movie, then burned the .cdr image to disc and it plays just fine.



    I'll have to try with another disc, just to see if this one didn't have CSS for some reason...
  • Reply 17 of 20
    ast3r3xast3r3x Posts: 5,012member
    Hmm...I thought even if it had CSS if you make a disc image (and it was single layered...less then 4.37GB) that it would work.



    Your duplicating the entire disc, not just copying the files.
  • Reply 18 of 20
    keshkesh Posts: 621member
    That's what I thought too.



    It's odd. The first one (some old werewolf flick I got in a bundle) copied just fine. The second (Bram Stoker's Dracula) came up as a blank screen when played.
  • Reply 19 of 20
    Yeah it's honestly not suppose to work, you might have just gotten lucky the first time or I've had bad luck everytime I've tried it. Not just that but what's the point in having CSS on the DVD's if it's that easy to copy? Just some thoughts.
  • Reply 20 of 20
    i have some live music dvds to make copies for friends, which is the program i should use?



    edit: does mactheripper make an exact copy?
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