Autocad

Posted:
in Mac Software edited January 2014
hey,



I bet a lot of mac users would love to have autocad on their favorite operating system. Since there isn't an os x version (as far as I know) what other software satisfy the need for a native os x autocad ? I know I can always use Virtual PC, but I really would like to get an os x native alternative to autocad.



thanks

peace []

Comments

  • Reply 1 of 17
    ebbyebby Posts: 3,110member
    It was hard enough finding Autocad for OS9. I don't think there will be a Native OSX version. VPC is your best bet.



    EDIT: Oh, Alternative to autocad. I know there is a really popular drawing program for mac, but I never used it and don't know what its called. Sorry.
  • Reply 2 of 17
    buonrottobuonrotto Posts: 6,368member
    A few very worthy alternatives:



    ArchiCAD

    VectorWorks

    High Design

    BOA

    PowerCADD



    When you get into 3D, there are more:



    FormZ

    Modo

    Maya

    SketchUp

    Cheetah

    Blender



    There are more, but at least somewhat familiar with these and I like them. Nothing is going to be totally transparent to AutoCAD files or exchange since even AutoCAD isn't that easy with its own files. But a lot of these are not only as capable, but a lot nicer. If you're really intimate with all the old aCAD text input though, we're tlaking about a fair learning curve. In terms of the modelers, well, every modeler has a big learning curve with exception maybe to SketchUp which is easy to pick up but doens't have the advanced tools or rendering support in itself.



    You can look up more Mac CAD apps at www.versiontracker.com and www.macupdate.com
  • Reply 3 of 17
    AutoCAD sucks.



    I have a PC at work, and I still don't use it, since, quite frankly, for what I do FormZ is better in all respects for everything except tradition.



    AutoCAD and other programs with "CAD" in their names tend to be 2D programs with some kludged capacity for 3D. They have some usefulness for some applications, namely civil engineering projects, but if your projects are mechanical or ID focused, it's just a pile of shit.



    I have mentioned FormZ quite a few times on these forums, because I like it immensely. It has 2D and 3D capabilities. I use it to design:



    - Complex wiring for analog PCB circuits

    - PCB antennas

    - Die cutting tools

    - 2D/3D schematics and plans

    - Injection molded plastic parts

    - Industrial Design work for commercial/industrial electronics



    That covers a pretty big core of the market AutoCAD has managed to somehow maintain over the years.
  • Reply 4 of 17
    Quote:

    Originally posted by BuonRotto

    A few very worthy alternatives:



    ArchiCAD

    VectorWorks

    High Design

    BOA

    PowerCADD



    When you get into 3D, there are more:



    FormZ

    Modo

    Maya

    SketchUp

    Cheetah

    Blender





    I have used VectorWorks a little. It's supposed to be based on the orginal AutoCAD program. AutoCAD is a great program, but their are plenty of drawing programs on the Mac and it's AutoCAD's fault if they won't port to OS X
  • Reply 5 of 17
    kcmackcmac Posts: 1,051member
    VectorWorks is great.



    However, AutoCADD is just like MS Word. De-facto standard.



    Bloated, loaded with features, etc. They do enough tweaks with each version to destroy compatibility with other programs like VW.



    If you really must be 100% compatible with AutoCADD, use it.



    BTW, at about 5K per, Auto Desk has set the standard for overpricing that makes MS look like a saint.
  • Reply 6 of 17
    buonrottobuonrotto Posts: 6,368member
    AutoCAD is barely compatible with itself. I mean, even if everyone involved with a particular project uses AutoCAD, if even one computer is using a different version from the others, you have to jump through hoops to deal with compatibility issues even within the platform. AutoCAD figures that this forces everyone to upgrade, but people simply refuse to pay out the nose for a more bloated version of AutoCAD each year even if it means not being fully compatible with whoever did upgrade. The lowest common denominator wins out in all situations where CAD data is being exchanged, and if that's the release 9 version of the .dwg format, then so be it. At that point, why not just use what you like? Virtually every other CAD app out there can read and write even very recent versions of the .dwg format. If you have to "dumb" down to the aCAD 2000 format, that's fine too.



    I've never bought into the argument that you have to have AutoCAD because it's "what everyone else uses." Something like 50-60% of architects use some version of AutoCAD, but considering how incompatible each release is with the last, the market is in effect much more fragmented. AutoCAD's hold in engineering and construction is larger, I believe, but the effect is the same.



    Truth is, the format itself is pretty dumb and always will be the lowest common denominator. With BIMs, parametric modelers and 3D coming down the pipe, even AutoDesk knows that the .dwg format is too dumbed down even in the 2005 format for really meaningful exchange of data. They're hoping that Revit and its very poor concept of using a monolithic project database will lock in users too, but of course, they don't have the same traction with BIMs as they did with dumb old AutoCAD, and people are looking at more able, more manageable, faster, more flexible alternatives.



    AutoCAD is the Quark Xpress of the AEC industry. It will always have a decent user base of people who only know AutoCAD and have no interest or motivation to graduate to better, and they will do a good job with the tools they have. But this group and the platform will atrophy as others come in to supplant it. Unlike Quark, at least AutoDesk knows this, which is why they've bought up so many other tools and are pushing them (particularly Revit) onto its installed aCAD base to try to catch the next wave. Unfortunately for them Revit is rather poorly considered. It is simply poorly executed and cumbersome, especially for large projects and at the earliest phases of design.



    /end rant



  • Reply 7 of 17
    kcmackcmac Posts: 1,051member
    You are correct BuonRotto.



    What also is interesting with AC right now is you can't upgrade to XP SP2 because of issues with AC. At least that is Microsoft's story. (Corporate networking environment.)
  • Reply 8 of 17
    Quote:

    Originally posted by BuonRotto

    You can look up more Mac CAD apps at www.versiontracker.com and www.macupdate.com



    You can also check out www.architosh.com for Mac related CAD applications.
  • Reply 9 of 17
    e1618978e1618978 Posts: 6,073member
    On a related note, what is the best program for doing house drawings?
  • Reply 10 of 17
    Quote:

    Originally posted by e1618978

    On a related note, what is the best program for doing house drawings?



    What do you mean? You are an architect and you want to produce working drawings or you are not and you want an application to move rooms around?
  • Reply 11 of 17
    e1618978e1618978 Posts: 6,073member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by k squared

    What do you mean? You are an architect and you want to produce working drawings or you are not and you want an application to move rooms around?



    I'm not an architect, and I want an application to move rooms around. Preferably something that can generate good enough drawings for building permits.
  • Reply 12 of 17
    buonrottobuonrotto Posts: 6,368member
    Oddly, the choices on the Mac for this are quite limited. Weird that there are tons of 3D modelers and CAD apps, but few mom-and-pop floor plan apps. The only one that I know of that's close is MicroSpot Interiors, and I'm not sure that's exactly what you're looking for. Try searching either www.versiontracker.com or www.macupdate.com to see if I'm missing something.
  • Reply 13 of 17
    Quote:

    Originally posted by e1618978

    I'm not an architect, and I want an application to move rooms around. Preferably something that can generate good enough drawings for building permits.



    Just curious: why not hire an architect? Too expensive? Haven't thought about it? Bad experience in the past?
  • Reply 14 of 17
    e1618978e1618978 Posts: 6,073member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by k squared

    Just curious: why not hire an architect? Too expensive? Haven't thought about it? Bad experience in the past?



    This is for an addition to my house - I can already picture exactly what I want, and I just need to generate drawings.



    Architects always want to change things, so you end up having to explain why you want it a particular way. Plus they add 17% to the cost of the project.

    The guy that build my house originally was an architect, and he spent way too much time trying to make the house look cool, and not enough time making the house solid and usable - and this was a house he built for himself!



    I will hire a civil engineer to make sure that the planned structure is ok, though, and I will also get a computer generated HVAC plan.



    My first addition, I did the general contracting and the electrical. I hired an Autocad fellow to do the drawings. This next time, I will just do the general contracting, and sub out the electrical - but the way my wife and I interact I will have to revisit the drawings 10 or so times, so I want to be able to do them myself.



    Even if it didn't generate drawings that were good enough for the planning board - I could use them to get past the planning stages with my wife.
  • Reply 15 of 17
    e1618978e1618978 Posts: 6,073member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by BuonRotto

    Oddly, the choices on the Mac for this are quite limited. Weird that there are tons of 3D modelers and CAD apps, but few mom-and-pop floor plan apps. The only one that I know of that's close is MicroSpot Interiors, and I'm not sure that's exactly what you're looking for. Try searching either www.versiontracker.com or www.macupdate.com to see if I'm missing something.



    Actually - that interior program might just do the trick for me. I could do the rough drawings on graph paper, and each room with MicroSpot. This would be enough to get my wife's buy in, and also enough to send to the drafter for autocad work.



    Thanks!
  • Reply 16 of 17
    buonrottobuonrotto Posts: 6,368member
    Well, glad I could help. Sorry there's a dearth of this kind of software on the Mac.



    BTW, you just got help from an architect, so there! Seriously, don't worry about skipping an architect for something like that. Architects charge a much higher percentage for those kinds of projects because they're really, really hard to make a profit on them. I know a lot of architects and landscape architects who would turn down this kind of work even if they had nothing else going on because while no work means no money made, a little work can mean money lost.



    If you can find a decent contractor (one who won't hit you up for money with each problem hit during construction) or design-build contractor, that can help a lot. With a design-build outfit, you can help reduce the risk less reputable contractors (and some big, mean ones) will try to claim that every construction problem is really a design problem (which is your problem, not theirs), and thus you have to pay them extra to "fix" it. It's one of the best ways to bilk the client out of money, and it's an ugly legal issue to deal with. Ask to see one of their projects under construction too. The condition they keep the worksite in is usually indicative of their work ethic, the quality of the materials and methods they use, and how seriously they take site safety. If there's no broom in site, nails all over the floor and no drawings laying around, keep searching for a better contractor.
  • Reply 17 of 17
    aplnubaplnub Posts: 2,583member
    I wish autocad would get motivated and get on board with the Mac again.



    It is my industries standard and I have to have it to survive.



    Eric
Sign In or Register to comment.