New 20 incher NOT sharp-CRT blows it away

Posted:
in Current Mac Hardware edited January 2014
I got the new 20" cinema display and I may have to bring it back. Actually, so far I hate it. The picture is fuzzy. What I don't know is, is it just the way LCD's look, seeing how I never used one. I am am comparing it side by side with my Sony 19" CRT.

The main proble is small to medium text. In Adobe Illustrator and Microsoft word, 12, 14 and even 24pt type looks much fuzzier than on my CRT. Also, if i draw a circle in Illustrator on both displays, the Cinema display shows much more pixel evidence than the CRT.

I'm a graphic designer, and need to have an accurate crisp rendering on screen. Reviews of Apple LCD's always say they are amazingly crisp. I don't know why they say that. Maybe the new 20" isn't as sharp.

From a glance the image looks great, but reading a document in Word with 12pt type at 100% in max resolution doesn't even come close to the matching qualty of my CRT. I want to love this display, I just don't get. I've messed with the font smoothing settings to no avail.

What's the deal? Do I need to stick with a CRT?

:confused: <img src="confused.gif" border="0">
«13

Comments

  • Reply 1 of 53
    Try to play with the display settings in the System preferences, you are probably set on a interpolated resolution.

    Apple displaye are very good and crip. A LCD cannot be blurry by definition.



    If you don't want your 20inches screen, give it to me ;-)



    p.
  • Reply 2 of 53
    I new people would think I was wrong. It is set on the default (highest) resolution. I have fooled around with the display settings. It's the anti-aliasing (font smoothing) that's the problem. It makes the type especially, appear blurry and the consistency of the letter forms changes as you change the point size.
  • Reply 3 of 53
    eotkueotku Posts: 37member
    What hardware and OS are you using with it?
  • Reply 4 of 53
    thegeldingthegelding Posts: 3,230member
    i'm not in front of my lcd iMac, but you can change the front size smoothing in system profiler...so it won't smooth below 8 or 9 or 10 or whatever you like.....g
  • Reply 5 of 53
    -I'm using a Ti Powerbook 1 Ghz with DVI to ADC adapter running OS 10.2.1

    -I tried the font smoothing options, it doesn't help



    ALSO, I noticed a faint red line on the right side of all letterforms and objects. If I draw a square in Illustrator, the right edge of the square has a red shadow, 1 pixel wide. I notice this most in the Apple menus. The vertical lines of letters have a slight red cast. Does this happen on your Apple flatscreens.
  • Reply 6 of 53
    algolalgol Posts: 833member
    either you are a troll or you have a bad display. Apple LCD screens are kick ass!!!! I use them all the time and they are not fuzzy or anything. Call Apple have it replaced...
  • Reply 7 of 53
    I have the 20" Cinema Display and it is absolutely perfect. I have no fuzziness problems. It is extremely sharp from corner to corner. When I came back to work today, I thought my CRT was fuzzy...



    Here are some pics of my cinema display. I can take closeups if you'd like...



    <a href="http://homepage.mac.com/vangorkomm/apple/PhotoAlbum45.html"; target="_blank">My 20" Cinema Display</a>



    ---------

    RosettaStoned
  • Reply 8 of 53
    joekjoek Posts: 93member
    [quote]Originally posted by appdezine:

    <strong>I new people would think I was wrong. It is set on the default (highest) resolution. I have fooled around with the display settings. It's the anti-aliasing (font smoothing) that's the problem. It makes the type especially, appear blurry and the consistency of the letter forms changes as you change the point size.</strong><hr></blockquote>



    System Preferences -&gt; General -&gt; Font Smoothing Style -&gt; Medium (Best for Flat Panel)
  • Reply 9 of 53
    leonisleonis Posts: 3,427member
    [quote]Originally posted by RosettaStoned:

    <strong>

    I can take closeups if you'd like...



    ---------

    RosettaStoned</strong><hr></blockquote>



    YES, please do. Also if possible could you take a shot of the display sitting beside the tower. I want to see the display's physical size in relation to the tower
  • Reply 10 of 53
    eugeneeugene Posts: 8,254member
    How close are you to an Apple Store or dealer? You should go to one ASAP and check out the 20" LCDs they have there to see if they have the same display qualities as yours.
  • Reply 11 of 53
    msanttimsantti Posts: 1,377member
    SHARPNESS is generally one area where an LCD screen blows out a CRT based one.



    <img src="confused.gif" border="0">
  • Reply 12 of 53
    I believe the red you see on the side of letters and lines is the font smoothing. You should also probably see a little blue on the left side. LCDs can do font smoothing by using sub-pixels (red, green, or blue) instead of whole pixels (red+green+blue) to effectively triple the horizontal resolution for text (at least that is how I understand it to work). It may be weird at first to get used to, but I like it more.
  • Reply 13 of 53
    rodukroduk Posts: 706member
    [quote]Originally posted by appdezine:

    <strong>

    The main proble is small to medium text. In Adobe Illustrator and Microsoft word, 12, 14 and even 24pt type looks much fuzzier than on my CRT. Also, if i draw a circle in Illustrator on both displays, the Cinema display shows much more pixel evidence than the CRT.

    </strong><hr></blockquote>



    I expect the fuzziness may be due to the anti aliasing (font smoothing). I believe on a LCD this can be done at the sub pixel level, giving black text a slight coloured 'shadow'.

    In my experience LCDs do show more pixel evidence, simply because they are so sharp. The pixels are less noticeable on a CRT as they tend to blur into each other. I guess there's a balance to be struck with LCDs. You either have text sharp, in which case you can notice the pixels, or you use font smoothing, in which case you can notice some fuzziness.



    Even so, I'd try and check out some other Apple LCDs to see if there is a genuine fault with your display or DVI-ADC adapter.



    [ 02-01-2003: Message edited by: RodUK ]</p>
  • Reply 14 of 53
    rodukroduk Posts: 706member
    [quote]Originally posted by Leonis:

    <strong>



    YES, please do. Also if possible could you take a shot of the display sitting beside the tower. I want to see the display's physical size in relation to the tower </strong><hr></blockquote>



    Why so much interest in a display with a ADC and 1 year warranty
  • Reply 15 of 53
    leonisleonis Posts: 3,427member
    [quote]Originally posted by RodUK:

    <strong>



    Why so much interest in a display with a ADC and 1 year warranty </strong><hr></blockquote>



    Hey...it doesn't hurt to see
  • Reply 16 of 53
    Every Apple flat panel I have seen is so stunningly gorgeous.
  • Reply 17 of 53
    aquaticaquatic Posts: 5,602member
    I agree. You must have an Apple lemon.
  • Reply 18 of 53
    brussellbrussell Posts: 9,812member
    I want to just echo what others have said about sub-pixel anti-aliasing. I know when I first started using LCDs regularly, I felt the same way you do. I preferred the look of a good CRT. I'm not saying that there isn't something wrong with your monitor, but from what you've described, it sounds like it may be normal.



    Re: your questions in the other thread that was locked. The 'i's in my menus don't look different, but the 'l' in 'File' is definitely thicker than the 'l' in 'Help.' If you look closely, you can see that the 'l' in 'Help' sits right on one column of pixels and doesn't use any sub-pixels, whereas the 'l' in 'File' sits on two columns of pixels and the sub-pixels on the outside of the 'l' are used.
  • Reply 19 of 53
    akacakac Posts: 511member
    [quote]Originally posted by RodUK:

    <strong>



    I expect the fuzziness may be due to the anti aliasing (font smoothing). I believe on a LCD this can be done at the sub pixel level, giving black text a slight coloured 'shadow'.

    In my experience LCDs do show more pixel evidence, simply because they are so sharp. The pixels are less noticeable on a CRT as they tend to blur into each other. I guess there's a balance to be struck with LCDs. You either have text sharp, in which case you can notice the pixels, or you use font smoothing, in which case you can notice some fuzziness.



    Even so, I'd try and check out some other Apple LCDs to see if there is a genuine fault with your display or DVI-ADC adapter.



    [ 02-01-2003: Message edited by: RodUK ]</strong><hr></blockquote>



    Yes, but font smoothing would NOT be happening on lines drawn in illustrator or even the normal OS. Its only applied to text. OS X does smoothing of text, but in no way does smoothing of graphic objects.



    You've got a bad LCD.
  • Reply 20 of 53
    murbotmurbot Posts: 5,262member
    Have it checked out and let us know how it turns out. I'm curious to hear what the problem is.
Sign In or Register to comment.