Geeky stuff for Electronic Engineers

Posted:
in General Discussion edited January 2014
HDMI chipsets finally announced for computers



Quote:

Designed for Intel CPU-based chipsets, the SiI 1390 transmitter accepts Intel's Serial Digital Video Output (SDVO) input and offers a fully compliant HDMI output capable of supporting video resolutions up to UXGA and 1080p with up to eight channels of 192kHz audio. It supports both motherboard-down applications for desktop and notebook PCs, as well as ADD2 card applications. The SiI 1930 HDMI transmitter also provides an HDMI output. Designed for graphics card applications using a discrete Graphics Processor Unit



Some of y'all know i've been crowing about HDMI as the next interconnect standard. Well here's one shoe dropping. I'm sure Apple will adopt as well.



Broadcom announces TOE, iSCSI support in one chipset



Quote:

The new NetXtreme II C-NIC is the first to support the PCI Express(R) bus architecture, and continues the product family's distinction as the only line of GbE controllers in the industry to support a TCP/IP offload engine (TOE), iSCSI, and Remote Direct Memory Access (RDMA) on a single-chip platform.



This is for you Overtoasty. Looks like we'll have that TOE support in some future generation Mac. Apple and Broadcom have worked together before.



Yet another flash card format coming



Quote:

Simplicity derives from the use of USB protocols for the digital portion. But the speed is twice that of USB, and the low-power consumption is only one-third or one-fourth that of USB 2.0, said Liu Chih-yuan, who directed the project at ITRI and is chairman of the Mì-Card Alliance. "That's our strength. It's a very low-power, high speed USB compatible interface. So we are complementary to the MMC."



Comments

  • Reply 1 of 3
    splinemodelsplinemodel Posts: 7,311member
    1. Does HDMI have any benefit over DVI?

    2. I fully expected the single chip TOE. Doing it any other way is ludicrous.
  • Reply 2 of 3
    hmurchisonhmurchison Posts: 12,215member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by Splinemodel

    1. Does HDMI have any benefit over DVI?

    2. I fully expected the single chip TOE. Doing it any other way is ludicrous.






    HDMI has better shielding than DVI so it can be run over longer distances. There are HDMI-DVI cables so you can have the best of both words if you're starting out HDMI at the device. And last but not least HDMI has the bandwidth to support multiple channels of uncompressed audio. I think next year we start seeing HDMI connections show up on motherboards. HTPC will be easy to setup with HDMI and support for HDCP.



    I want to see what benchmark effects TOE Nics have on a system. I'm assuming that it benefits high load systems more than basic networking.
  • Reply 3 of 3
    splinemodelsplinemodel Posts: 7,311member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by hmurchison

    HDMI has better shielding than DVI so it can be run over longer distances. There are HDMI-DVI cables so you can have the best of both words if you're starting out HDMI at the device. And last but not least HDMI has the bandwidth to support multiple channels of uncompressed audio. I think next year we start seeing HDMI connections show up on motherboards. HTPC will be easy to setup with HDMI and support for HDCP.





    Do you know if the better shielding is inherently a part of HDMI, which seems strange, or just part of the fact that every HDMI cable I've seen is thick as a mofo? That is, I'm wondering if shielding is even part of the DVI spec. What might be part of the HDMI spec is higher voltage differential signaling, which would indeed allow for longer cable lengths than DVI can, say, if DVI used TTL signaling.



    The audio thing is nice, but in the end a DVI 2.0 could easily address this. When you're signaling within a shielded cable, it's a lot easier to ramp up the frequency/bandwidth without conflict than it is with wireless.



    Sorry to be so picky. I've just always wondered what was the point of HDMI, particularly when it requires buying an $100 cable versus taking a surplus DVI cable, for free, from the storage closet at the office. Indeed, my HDTV has a DVI input, which is cool because it means I might have to get a mini.
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