Java 5.0 (1.5.0)

Posted:
in macOS edited January 2014
Does anyone know when Apple will release SDK 5.0 (1.5.0) for MacOS X ?



I am doing an advanded programming unit this semester, and it looks as if they will be using java 5 throughout the semester...



.:BoeManE:.

Comments

  • Reply 1 of 4
    Current speculation is that it will ship with/near 10.4, whenever that happens. Further speculation says that it will only be available on 10.4, no Panther version. Again, this is all speculation; only Apple knows, and as usual Apple isn't telling.
  • Reply 2 of 4
    elronelron Posts: 126member
    I was struggling with this a while ago and found this: http://homepage.mac.com/spullara/ran...901/E76947863/



    I haven't actually done what that page describes, but it claims that if you follow the directions you'll be able to use generics, the new for loop, limited annotations, and somewhat buggy autoboxing/unboxing. Definitely a step in the right direction, but I found it was easier to just develop on a windows box. It's Java so you'll be able to run it on a Mac as soon as their 1.5 VM is released.
  • Reply 3 of 4
    mdriftmeyermdriftmeyer Posts: 7,233member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by elron

    I was struggling with this a while ago and found this: http://homepage.mac.com/spullara/ran...901/E76947863/



    I haven't actually done what that page describes, but it claims that if you follow the directions you'll be able to use generics, the new for loop, limited annotations, and somewhat buggy autoboxing/unboxing. Definitely a step in the right direction, but I found it was easier to just develop on a windows box. It's Java so you'll be able to run it on a Mac as soon as their 1.5 VM is released.




    You mean Apple doesn't put as many resources on Java as it does Objective-C? Oh the agony!



    Java is even more enjoyable to develop on Linux than on Windows. Of course you'll get 100 different opinions.



    I would focus on developing Cocoa ObjC on OS X but the Server-side Java and AppServer Markets work just fine on OS X as well. It's not difficult to get Apache XML and Java technologies up and running, even though they aren't ``fully integrated seemlessly inside OS X.''



    The way Apple incorporates Java within the Cocoa frameworks means it will take more time than just assigning a specific area of the filesystem to be just java pathways.
  • Reply 4 of 4
    elronelron Posts: 126member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by mdriftmeyer

    You mean Apple doesn't put as many resources on Java as it does Objective-C? Oh the agony!



    I didn't mean to imply that Apple has been too slow in putting out a 1.5 VM. I love how Apple spent the extra effort to make Java integrate into OS X and I hope they continue to do so. If we don't get a 1.5 implementation until 6 months after Windows does, so be it. It's not like there's a killer app that necessitates the upgrade -- most developers are probably still coding for 1.4 anyway.



    Cocoa is the API for writing OS X applications and Apple should spend more time on that framework than Java. You'll get no argument from me on that one.



    Quote:

    Java is even more enjoyable to develop on Linux than on Windows. Of course you'll get 100 different opinions.



    I can only surmise that this was in response to my "it was easier to just develop on a windows box" line. Basically, I was given the choice between jumping through hoops to get buggy support of 1.5 constructs on OS X (not complaining, just stating facts) or just developing on the Windows machine that's sitting on my desk at home. I went with the latter. If I had a Linux machine, maybe I would have gone with that instead.



    I can almost see how it would be nicer to write Java on Linux though -- especially if you're deploying to an application server. I've never had to manage an app-server, but I imagine it would be much more pleasant on Linux.



    I have to admit that I don't see much of a difference between Windows and Linux if you're just writing a GUI app though. Even the tools that aren't written in Java are available on both platforms, so the only real differentiator I can see is the OS itself. I haven't tried to run Linux on a desktop machine in at least 2 years, but last time I did it frustrated me even more than Windows. I'm sure it's improved since then, but I found a better desktop Unix in OS X. I keep the Windows box around because sometimes you just need a Windows box.
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