remote login

Posted:
in macOS edited January 2014
hey folks....i know that through ssh you can get into a central computer from a terminal window but here's my situation.

i have a desktop at home that is usually left on. i would love to be able to have access to that drive when i am on the road with my powerbook. is there anyway to do this without getting something like remote desktop? or going through ssh? im not familiar with it and would love a GUI way of accesssing that computer..any ideas?

thanks

Comments

  • Reply 1 of 8
    relicrelic Posts: 4,735member
    Your wish is my command; http://www.realvnc.com/ .





    You should learn how to use ssh and sftp.



    ssh www.somedomain.com -l youruser



    ls <- list files in current directoy

    pwd <- print working directory

    rm -f <-- remove file

    r, -rf <- remove directory

    cp <- copy file

    cp -r <- copy directory

    mv <- move file

    mv -r move directory

    exit <- exit connection
  • Reply 2 of 8
    lundylundy Posts: 4,466member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by macfly



    i have a desktop at home that is usually left on. i would love to be able to have access to that drive when i am on the road with my powerbook.




    Any of the free VNC servers/clients would work (search on VersionTracker for "VNC") - you get a desktop on the remote machine that you can control just as if you were at the base machine.



    The home machine has to keep the same IP address though - if you have a fixed IP you are all set. If you don't, then the thing to do is install a little app on the home machine that notifies another machine if its IP changes. Go to dyndns.org to get a free account.
  • Reply 3 of 8
    macflymacfly Posts: 256member
    thanks folks. yeah, i would like to learn command line stuff. people who work with it a lot say its pretty nice once u know it. what about apple remote desktop? i know its a bit pricey but seems like the way to go for total control. plus if you have house full o macs it might be better for administering them
  • Reply 4 of 8
    If you are just looking for access to the files, something like Transmit or one of the other graphical sftp programs might be your best bet. And don't forget that from another mac, you can use Appletalk though it's slow.
  • Reply 5 of 8
    lundylundy Posts: 4,466member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by macfly

    thanks folks. yeah, i would like to learn command line stuff. people who work with it a lot say its pretty nice once u know it. what about apple remote desktop? i know its a bit pricey but seems like the way to go for total control. plus if you have house full o macs it might be better for administering them



    It's great and works perfectly, but as you said, it's pricey. The new version just uses VNC.



    And there is still the issue of making sure the home unit always has an IP that you can use.
  • Reply 6 of 8
    tchwojkotchwojko Posts: 139member
    What about WebDAV?
  • Reply 7 of 8
    fahlmanfahlman Posts: 700member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by lundy

    And there is still the issue of making sure the home unit always has an IP that you can use.



    Check out http://www.dyndns.org to map your dynamic IP Address to a static URL.
  • Reply 8 of 8
    toweltowel Posts: 1,479member
    The simplest way is to turn on Personal File Sharing in the Sharing Preference Pane of your home Desktop. Then you can access its drive in your Powerbook's Finder by choosing Go:Connect to Server and typing in your Desktop's IP address. It's relatively slow and insecure, but convenient.



    An alternative is to instead turn on Remote Login (aka SSH) and then connect to the Desktop using SFTP in Transit or Fugu (note that you don't need to turn on FTP in order to use SFTP - yeah, confusing). This is faster and much more secure than Apple File Sharing, but you need to use an FTP client instead of the Finder.



    In any case, like others have said, you need to make sure your Desktop's IP address is relatively unchanging. Most broadband ISPs will rarely change your IP so long as your DSL/Cable modem remains plugged in and powered on. However, if you're going to be away for a long time, and no one's at home that can access the computer to tell you a new IP address, using something like DynDNS might be a good idea.
Sign In or Register to comment.