Mac OS X 10.5, QuickDraw, Classic

Posted:
in macOS edited January 2014
I saw in a WWDC 2004 video on Apple's site that Apple will deprecate (discourage use of) QuickDraw in Mac OS X 10.4. Presumably, this means support for it will be removed altogether in Mac OS X 10.5. Assuming that to be the case, and assuming that Classic support depends on QuickDraw support, will that mean the end of Classic?



I think this is the link to the correct video.

Comments

  • Reply 1 of 3
    mr. memr. me Posts: 3,219member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by wrldwzrd89

    I saw in a WWDC 2004 video on Apple's site that Apple will deprecate (discourage use of) QuickDraw in Mac OS X 10.4. Presumably, this means support for it will be removed altogether in Mac OS X 10.5. Assuming that to be the case, and assuming that Classic support depends on QuickDraw support, will that mean the end of Classic?



    I think this is the link to the correct video.




    First off, this is old news as evidenced by your 2004 link. To the larger point, you are simply mistaken. The support for QuickDraw in Classic is contained in the MacOS 9 ROM file and has nothing to do with whether or not it is supported by MacOS X 10.5. Until now, QuickDraw has been an essential element of Carbon. The support for QuickDraw in Carbon is coming to an end.
  • Reply 2 of 3
    I guess that Apple will have to make some other system change to force the death of Classic. What will that be? Who knows...
  • Reply 3 of 3
    I am not sure that this does not presage the death of Classic... wrldwzrd89 does make a valid point that Classic apps look to the MacOS 9 System Folder for their drawing routines, but under the Classic environment many of the system routines are replaced with stubs that lead to calls made in the MacOS X System levels. Exactly how this works for screen drawing is not completely clear. We, as non Apple employees, have no real access to this information.



    But, there are two much more important points to be made here:



    This definitely presages Apple's attempts at stopping all further MacOS 9 application development. Up to that point you can still make applications that will function in MacOS 9, and the latest version of MacOS X. After that point, you will have to choose one or the other.



    The second point... and this one is far more important: We are talking about 10.5 and that is supposed to come out sometime near January 2007, six years after MacOS X came out. At that point any critical software will have moved on, or will be so trivial in relative speed to easily fit into an emulator, just like some people use for System 6 software today. This is all a tempest in a teakettle.
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