What does this mean for dual platform software?

Posted:
in Future Apple Hardware edited January 2014
If an average consumer in 12 months time is faced with the choice of going Mac (Intel) or Windows (Intel) to run an application like Adobe Photoshop which do you think they will choose? (If both are using the same-ish processors)



Will Photoshop run any faster using MacOS than Windows? What would be the incentive to choose if no speed difference?



Obviously you should never go Windows because of all them there virus thingies!!!



So many questions

Comments

  • Reply 1 of 2
    neutrino23neutrino23 Posts: 1,546member
    Well, this is just one of the major questions we'll be facing. The answer is that the experience with OS X will be much better, more reliable, safer and more productive. This is where Apple's advertising for the last five years comes back to haunt it. All that time they were toasting the snail with the Pentium and lighting fires to the Intel bunny suit guys Apple should have been touting the benefits of Apple's OS.



    A related question, if it will now be easy to run windows apps inside of OS X (either through Apple or MS or a third party) then why should anyone develop for the Mac? Eventually OS X will become just a wrapper for running windows programs and then it will wither away. At least that is one fear.
  • Reply 2 of 2
    atomichamatomicham Posts: 185member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by neutrino23

    A related question, if it will now be easy to run windows apps inside of OS X (either through Apple or MS or a third party) then why should anyone develop for the Mac? Eventually OS X will become just a wrapper for running windows programs and then it will wither away. At least that is one fear.



    Well, the problem is that you would be running Windows within a Mac window and it would not be a pleasant experience (ala Classic). That was OS/2's problem, it had the Windows API layer than transferred windows calls into OS/2 calls, so it seemed like a native OS/2 app. Users were just as happy with it as an OS/2 app.



    Of course, I remember during Microsoft's FIRST DOJ dealings (the one that led to the consent decree they later violated and were convicted of in the late 90's) it was revealed that they had code in Excel that basically said, "if running on OS2, crash."



    Anyhow, I would say that WINE may be the biggest threat to what you are saying. If a person could run a Windows App and it LOOKED like an OSX app (behaved a little goofy) then they might not complain and the developer would be content.



    I personally believe that the gestalt of the OS X environment will keep plenty of excellent native apps coming. Cocoa is such a great environment for new developers (and, particularly, small operations who don't want to support Windows).
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