Intel Prepping OS X/Intel Development tools

Posted:
in macOS edited January 2014
http://www.eweek.com/article2/0,1895,1851752,00.asp





particularly interesting is this bit:



"Smith said that the tools will contain the same feature set that Intel now provides for its Windows and Linux development tools.



"We will offer one set of tools for all OSes," said Smith."





Things are getting interesting ..

Comments

  • Reply 1 of 17
    I am not sure why an Apple developer will want to pay for the Intel's plugins. XTools provide a comprehensive set of dev tools for free.
  • Reply 2 of 17
    Quote:

    Originally posted by ThinkingDifferent

    I am not sure why an Apple developer will want to pay for the Intel's plugins. XTools provide a comprehensive set of dev tools for free.



    Seriously though - Xcode is simply fantastic. One point of consideration, however, is that Intel may advertise their compiler as producing faster binaries on x86 hardware than GCC / Xcode.
  • Reply 3 of 17
    Quote:

    Originally posted by semi-fly

    Seriously though - Xcode is simply fantastic. One point of consideration, however, is that Intel may advertise their compiler as producing faster binaries on x86 hardware than GCC / Xcode.



    IBM's compiler is reported to be superior to GCC. How many OSX Developers use it?
  • Reply 4 of 17
    mr. memr. me Posts: 3,219member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by ThinkingDifferent

    IBM's compiler is reported to be superior to GCC. How many OSX Developers use it?



    Apple urges developers of PPC high performance apps to write their code using IBM's XL compilers.
  • Reply 5 of 17
    Quote:

    Originally posted by Mr. Me

    Apple urges developers of PPC high performance apps to write their code using IBM's XL compilers.



    Back in '97 we wanted to migrate from XLC to GCC because of licensing costs. We had a huge code repository that had to be recompiled. After recompiling the code in our dev environment we found some code no longer worked. We ended up staying with XLC. This was in a RS600 environment.
  • Reply 6 of 17
    Quote:

    Originally posted by ThinkingDifferent

    Back in '97 we wanted to migrate from XLC to GCC because of licensing costs. We had a huge code repository that had to be recompiled. After recompiling the code in our dev environment we found some code no longer worked. We ended up staying with XLC. This was in a RS600 environment.



    Isn't a single lincense for XL currently $600.00-$700.00?
  • Reply 7 of 17
    Quote:

    Originally posted by semi-fly

    Isn't a single lincense for XL currently $600.00-$700.00?



    At that time we had about 100 developers.
  • Reply 8 of 17
    Quote:

    Originally posted by ThinkingDifferent

    I am not sure why an Apple developer will want to pay for the Intel's plugins. XTools provide a comprehensive set of dev tools for free.



    You're right, of course; XCode etc is free and fabulous and the more people discover them, the better. But I'm not thinking about the 'Apple developer' per se. I'm thinking of shops with a casual interest in the platform, and the credibility that a set of compilers from no less a name than Intel will lend to the platform. Just another wave on the sea of change these days in Apple-land .. all adding up in terms of mindshare, and, let's hope, marketshare.



    Fun times ahead ..
  • Reply 9 of 17
    mr. memr. me Posts: 3,219member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by lanky_nathan

    You're right, of course; XCode etc is free and fabulous and the more people discover them, the better. But I'm not thinking about the 'Apple developer' per se. I'm thinking of shops with a casual interest in the platform, and the credibility that a set of compilers from no less a name than Intel will lend to the platform. Just another wave on the sea of change these days in Apple-land .. all adding up in terms of mindshare, and, let's hope, marketshare.



    Fun times ahead ..




    You seem to be under the impression that Xcode is difficult for the novice whereas other IDEs are easier. Not so.
  • Reply 10 of 17
    Quote:

    Originally posted by Mr. Me

    You seem to be under the impression that Xcode is difficult for the novice whereas other IDEs are easier. Not so.



    You took this from "XCode is free and fabulous, and the more people discover it, the better" ?



    Anyway .. I think this thread has outlived any usefulness it may ever had had :-)



    Back to PowerBook G5 speculation, heh.
  • Reply 11 of 17
    Quote:

    Originally posted by ThinkingDifferent

    At that time we had about 100 developers.



    Ouch -
  • Reply 12 of 17
    hugihugi Posts: 33member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by ThinkingDifferent

    At that time we had about 100 developers.



    When you reach that number of developers, I always recommend that you use some sort of SCM.



































  • Reply 13 of 17
    Quote:

    Originally posted by Hugi

    When you reach that number of developers, I always recommend that you use some sort of SCM.





    Which still doesn't alleviate the need for compiler licenses. At the time we were using RCS but they have since migrated to PVCS.
  • Reply 14 of 17
    hugihugi Posts: 33member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by ThinkingDifferent

    Which still doesn't alleviate the need for compiler licenses. At the time we were using RCS but they have since migrated to PVCS.



    Of course, It was just meant as a joke.
  • Reply 15 of 17
    jaredjared Posts: 639member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by lanky_nathan

    http://www.eweek.com/article2/0,1895,1851752,00.asp





    particularly interesting is this bit:



    "Smith said that the tools will contain the same feature set that Intel now provides for its Windows and Linux development tools.



    "We will offer one set of tools for all OSes," said Smith."





    Things are getting interesting ..




    Doesn't this mean that it will be easier to port applications? In theory anyway.
  • Reply 16 of 17
    jidojido Posts: 102member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by semi-fly

    Seriously though - Xcode is simply fantastic. One point of consideration, however, is that Intel may advertise their compiler as producing faster binaries on x86 hardware than GCC / Xcode.



    In that case developers could use ICC / Xcode, isn't it?



    Currently Xcode on PowerPC supports XLC, so I would expect it to support the Intel compiler on the Intel platform.
  • Reply 17 of 17
    webmailwebmail Posts: 639member
    Intel's compilers blow away GCC, they are optimized to get ever inch of performance out of a machine. It doesn't mean they won't be used inside of xcode. My understand is that Xcode will continue to be but, that Xcode will compile with Intel's tools.



    Intel's compilers will be awesome on OS X x86, It will make OS X very very snappy.
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