New Projector Technology

Posted:
in Future Apple Hardware edited January 2014
Has anyone seen this before:



http://www.lightblueoptics.com/



"Matchbook sized" projectors. This would be a wonderful way to integrate video into an iPod. Look at their mockup, looks like a familiar form factor. Not sure of the power requirements yet, but they are talking about the capability of integrating this tech into cell phones.



Pretty cool.



Comments

  • Reply 1 of 11
    I kind of don't see this as part of the iPod, but definitely something to watch for. There were rumors of an Apple projector awhile back, and it makes sense to me. But I would see this as something with a universal dock instead of integrated.
  • Reply 2 of 11
    e1618978e1618978 Posts: 6,073member
    This projector looks the same as the current JVC D-ILA LCOS projectors, except with no lens and a laser instead of halogen light. The big advantage besides size is (hopefully) less heat, which means no fan noise.



    It is probably a monocrome projector? The image on the web page looks like monocrome red. But I guess that you could have red, green and blue lasers if we have invented lasers with those colors (with a color wheel or three LCOS chips). Color projection would also require a FPGA with three times the horsepower of a monocrome projector (or three FPGAs).



    Even if they have pencil eraser sized lasers, I don't really see them getting a color projector down to iPod size - but monocrome could.
  • Reply 3 of 11
    tednditedndi Posts: 1,921member
    it's the i****!



  • Reply 4 of 11
    addaboxaddabox Posts: 12,660member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by e1618978

    This projector looks the same as the current JVC D-ILA LCOS projectors, except with no lens and a laser instead of halogen light. The big advantage besides size is (hopefully) less heat, which means no fan noise.



    It is probably a monocrome projector? The image on the web page looks like monocrome red. But I guess that you could have red, green and blue lasers if we have invented lasers with those colors (with a color wheel or three LCOS chips). Color projection would also require a FPGA with three times the horsepower of a monocrome projector (or three FPGAs).



    Even if they have pencil eraser sized lasers, I don't really see them getting a color projector down to iPod size - but monocrome could.




    Well, they're claiming matchbox size and on-the-fly generation of holographic defraction frames from source video, so it's not much like the JVC....



    Looks like interesting tech but hard to say from the website how likely actual product is. The developer kit is a monochrome unit, so I agree getting from there to color might be a real steep hill to climb.



    The thing about this kind of stuff is the difference between doing it and doing it well. I can imagine looking at a tiny projector and saying "Wow, it's amazing that you can get anything out of that. Course, what you get is dim, low contrast and oddly tinted, but, hey, good for you!".
  • Reply 5 of 11
    e1618978e1618978 Posts: 6,073member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by addabox

    Looks like interesting tech but hard to say from the website how likely actual product is. The developer kit is a monochrome unit, so I agree getting from there to color might be a real steep hill to climb.



    With 3-chip projectors, how does convergence work? I am guessing that the three chips converge on the internal surface of the lens, and the act of focusing the lens ensures that the image is still converged at the screen.



    I am relying on my C grade physics brain here, but my non-facty intuition tells me that they may need a lens to ensure color conversion at the screen even if they can get infinite focus for a monocrome image.
  • Reply 6 of 11
    Quote:

    Originally posted by TednDi

    it's the i****!







    Oh shit...you're right.



    In 10 years from now, we'll all be saying kormac was right.
  • Reply 7 of 11
    murkmurk Posts: 935member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by kim kap sol

    Oh shit...you're right.



    In 10 years from now, we'll all be saying kormac was right.




    10 years from now you'll be writing books about how close you were to Kormac and denying that you ever mocked him.
  • Reply 8 of 11
    vinney57vinney57 Posts: 1,162member
    Beware companies touting crappy CG mockups of 'products'
  • Reply 9 of 11
    addaboxaddabox Posts: 12,660member
    Now that you mention it, that mockup is kinda "my nephew, he uses the computer real good, lets get him to do it!"
  • Reply 10 of 11
    Quote:

    Originally posted by murk

    10 years from now you'll be writing books about how close you were to Kormac and denying that you ever mocked him.



    Whaaaat!? I never, ever, mocked him.
  • Reply 11 of 11
    fishafisha Posts: 126member
    what i dont understand is why use holograms?



    i've always wondered why you dont see scanning laser projectors. take a laser, pass it through an LCD pixel which controls the brightness and then hit it off a mirror setup which is doing a progressive scan of an image.



    look at the size of a pen laser. add a pixel gate infront of hit, then a small IC chip for the mirror and it wouldn't take up too much space.



    looking at the commonly available laser display units, it wouldn't be too hard a stretch to drive the scanning a little faster.



    admittedly what you would get is an image with gaps between the scanlines, but if you could diffuse the beam a little it may be enough to join up the lines.



    it could also have a much larger throw in terms of display distance ( think how far laser pens can throw a visible beam )
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