Why are so many Mac users anti-gaming?

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  • Reply 41 of 53
    resres Posts: 711member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by Aurora

    Alienwares suck That is funny , really funny when a brand new Quad G5 still cant match frame rates for Doom3 compared to my 1 1/2 yr old Aurora with 6800Gt and its single cpu



    And yes you are 100% correct about all the excuse makers.




    I think he meant that Alienware computers are overpriced (which I agree with), not that they are not high performance.
  • Reply 42 of 53
    splinemodelsplinemodel Posts: 7,311member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by Aurora

    Alienwares suck That is funny , really funny when a brand new Quad G5 still cant match frame rates for Doom3 compared to my 1 1/2 yr old Aurora with 6800Gt and its single cpu



    First off, this is getting way off topic. Second off, id software has gone public in stating that they don't like writing multithreaded apps. So obviously the AMD PC will be the hands-down winner for playing Doom 3. I think anyone in this topic wouldn't hesitate to get an AMD PC if FPS in Doom 3 were a priority.



    In fact, I'll posit that the reason why some people think we're anti-gaming in the first place is because kids come here and post "my AMD computer runs 100fps in Doom 3, my friends Powermac only gets 60," and they expect us to care. If we did, we wouldn't be mac users. It's really that simple.
  • Reply 43 of 53
    kim kap solkim kap sol Posts: 2,987member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by Placebo

    I don't see BF2 there. Or Half-Life 2. Or Civilization 4. or FEAR. Or EVE Online. Or dozens of other modern titles.



    See, games aren't a quantity that you can just numerically state. The number of total games doesn't reflect that the games are recent, or well optimized.




    Bye Placebo.
  • Reply 44 of 53
    trumptmantrumptman Posts: 16,461member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by Gon

    Huh?[/B]



    You are inserting the words from other parties using something other than the quote function because when I go to reply, it mixes both parties words together.



    Quote:

    You said it's always about first person shooters, I said that is not the case. It was a direct response to your post and not to anything else on this thread.



    It is almost exclusively about first person shooters. We are talking a good 80% of the titles people complain about are FPS.



    Quote:

    edit: really, it's irrelevant how many game titles are available overall. Most people are interested in playing a smallish set of games, and the kind of availability that matters is how many of those games will run on the platform.



    Exactly. I find plenty of games to play on my Mac and the lack of availability of say COD II doesn't harm me at all. I wouldn't buy a machine just to play that game be it a PC or a console called an XBox360. That doesn't mean I hate games. It just means I am not going to invest in expensive hardware to get that enjoyment. I own a Mac, have a gaming PC gathering dust, and also a Gamecube and PS1.



    Do I "hate games" because I prefer playing Mario DoubleKart with my six and four year old instead of playing some game where endless death is the only objective? I think not.



    Quote:

    What I said was that even a competetive player that is in top 20 in all of Europe and plays "his" game 4+ hours a day can get by with $250 cards, a far cry from the utterly unrealistic $600 figure you are throwing around. A casual player will get by with a $100 card and be very comfortable with a $150 one. And for a casual player with a $1000 HD screen, investing $300 in a card that can drive it at full resolution can't be a big deal.



    Look I understand where you are coming from, but you just don't get where the baseline is at. I don't "hate" movies because I don't buy the DVD, take it home and watch it in 5.1 vs. 7.1 Dolby Surround Sound and large HD television. You simply don't get that the majority of people do not invest near the amount of time and money that you and the company you keep happen to consider reasonable.



    My wife's favorite game right now is Sudoku which she plays online for free with her Mac. My favorite is called DinerDash which I purchased for $20. My sons enjoy the previously mentioned DoubleKart.



    Quote:

    I haven't had a PC in years, I have a PS2, but when I had one all games that needed a DirectX update installed it during the game install. You just had to click on Next and then OK. This is well within the capability of a casual gamer. What game requires driver updates?



    I don't recall anymore. My gaming PC is gathering dust. I seem to recall UT2004 when it came out, Farcry and some others. Most cutting edge games do require cutting edge drivers though.



    Quote:

    Originally posted by Bergermeister

    It is all in one's perspective.



    If you want those games, go get a PC and enjoy! You are free to choose whatever computer platform serves your needs. Nobody will stop you.




    This is how every Mac gaming thread ends when the "OMG da Mac's ain't got the coolest 3drad cardsicals..." realizes that almost no one shares their urgency.



    Nick
  • Reply 45 of 53
    xoolxool Posts: 2,460member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by Res

    At least Civilization 4 will be available for the Mac in a couple of months (but I don't if my new iBook will be able to play it).



    If Civ didn't make it to Mac it'd be a serious blow to Mac gaming, same for the Sim franchise.



    I'm glad its coming because the Civ series is where I've sunk the majority of my gaming time.
  • Reply 46 of 53
    MarvinMarvin Posts: 14,230moderator
    Quote:

    Originally posted by Splinemodel

    who's going to buy a mini and want to run 3D apps on it?



    - a Mini is all I can afford.



    Most 3D software has OpenGL previews so a good GPU is a big advantage.



    Quote:

    Originally posted by Splinemodel

    Just FYI: The iMac G5 is probably the best value for running 3D apps, since many of them aren't Intel compiled yet, many of them won't be for a while, and many of them have per-CPU licenses.



    Yeah but I don't like it because of the LCD display. The thing is, you recommend the imac G5 but if you remove the LCD display from the imac G5, what do you get? No, not a broken G5. I mean if you design the Mini like the imac G5 spec and don't include the display.



    You have what lots of people have been asking for.



    Core-duo imac:



    17-inch widescreen LCD with 1440x900 resolution

    1.83GHz Intel Core Duo processor with 2MB shared L2 cache

    512MB (single SO-DIMM) 667MHz DDR2 SDRAM (PC2-5300)

    160GB Serial ATA hard drive

    Slot-load 8x double-layer SuperDrive

    ATI Radeon X1600 graphics with 128MB GDDR3 memory

    Built-in AirPort Extreme and Bluetooth 2.0



    £929



    Core-Duo Mini:



    1.66GHz Intel Core Duo processor

    2MB L2 Cache

    667MHz Frontside Bus

    512MB memory (667MHz DDR2 SDRAM)

    80GB Serial ATA hard drive

    Double-layer SuperDrive (DVD+R DL/DVD±RW/CD-RW)

    Built-in AirPort Extreme and Bluetooth 2.0

    Apple Remote



    £599



    How much would the LCD be? £200? I'm sure for £699, Apple could have easily made a Mini with a good GPU.
  • Reply 47 of 53
    splinemodelsplinemodel Posts: 7,311member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by Marvin

    - a Mini is all I can afford.



    Most 3D software has OpenGL previews so a good GPU is a big advantage.





    I made that point. But, still, how is a mini nearly as good as an iMac G5? Since you can't get any Intel-compiled 3D software, you want the G5.



    To tell you the truth, though, my 3.5 year old Powerbook G4 1GHz with Radeon 9000/64MB and 1GB of RAM runs Universe 5.0 and FormZ 4.2 pretty well. Unless you're working with a shit-ton of polygons or are doing long animations, vintage hardware is fine. A mac mini with the 1.5GHz G4 and Radeon 9200 should do fine, and you can probably get one really cheap these days.



    But the bigger question is: how can you afford 3D software but not the iMac? Even at academic prices, you have to expect to drop more than US$1000 on Adobe CS plus EI plus FormZ/Maya. You can save a bit of money if you go with C4D or Silo, but you're still looking at more than US$1000.



    Incidentally, the price of the iMac is better on this side of the Pond. A 20" iMac G5 is $1500, A 20" iMac Core Duo is $1700. If a pount is 1.83 dollars, then we have the 20" Core Duo as 929 pounds.
  • Reply 48 of 53
    iposteriposter Posts: 1,560member
    Mac gamers? Do they even exist? (Warning! PG-13 language in link!)



    Actually, I do play games on my Mac, but I also have a PC for PC only/high FPS games, and a Gamecube and PS2 for the family. But I'm not what some people would consider 'hardcore', I only upgrade hardware when there is a game I want to run and my hardware won't run it acceptably. I used a GF2MX for four years with no complaints, and am currently playing Half Life 2 just fine with a $100 GPU.
  • Reply 49 of 53
    Generally mac users are professionals who use their mac a good amount of the day... The last thing I want to do after looking at a a mac screen all day working with video, graphics, and images is look at the same screen and play games on it.



    That is what the TV and console in the living room is for. And unfortunately, mac blew that option with the release of miniMac with intel integrated graphics.
  • Reply 50 of 53
    placeboplacebo Posts: 5,767member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by kim kap sol

    Bye Placebo.



    Nice rebuttal.
  • Reply 51 of 53
    resres Posts: 711member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by Splinemodel





    -snip-



    But the bigger question is: how can you afford 3D software but not the iMac? Even at academic prices, you have to expect to drop more than US$1000 on Adobe CS plus EI plus FormZ/Maya. You can save a bit of money if you go with C4D or Silo, but you're still looking at more than US$1000.



    -snip-





    For people on a very tight budget things like that can happen. Say you have barely managed to scrape together $2000 over the course of a year, and the software that you need costs $1200 -- that only leaves $800 for the hardware. You could keep waiting until you have more money for hardware, but it is often better to just get on with the project.



    I am sort of that situation. I am running Logic Pro 7 on my iBook. I would really like to run it on a more powerful computer, but I could not come op with the money for it.
  • Reply 52 of 53
    grahamwgrahamw Posts: 575member
    All of my stuff arrived from Ontario yesterday. Including my HT P4 with a gig of ram, ATI9800 and 20" Gateway Widescreen.



    I wasn't anxious to pull it out of the box. I've been playing WOW and yesterday I reinstalled Warcraft III on my new iMac - plays like a dream.



    Tell you what I did unpack? My Xbox 360, my PS2 and my Gamecube. Call of Duty on a 20" Screen or on a 50" with full surround at 1080i? Tough decision.



    I think I'm going to sell the PC - it's just rediculous to keep it around for HL2. I'll buy the mediocre Xbox port instead. I'm happy to be a Mac Gamer.



    Final thought - whenever the screen goes black on Windows XP as a game boots - anyone ever get that feeling of dread and the "Oh... COME ON!" as you think the game's about to crash? I don't get that on my Mac - I just feel more confident about things "just working"
  • Reply 53 of 53
    placeboplacebo Posts: 5,767member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by Aurora

    Alienwares suck That is funny , really funny when a brand new Quad G5 still cant match frame rates for Doom3 compared to my 1 1/2 yr old Aurora with 6800Gt and its single cpu



    And yes you are 100% correct about all the excuse makers.




    Well, the brand-new Powermac with four cores is running an operating system with pretty mediocre OpenGL drivers, on a game that was not particularly build for the PowerPC processor, just to be fair to the Powermac.



    But my point was more that I can go down the list on Alienware's website, use their cool little selection toy to say what I want (with a whole lot less selection), and then just buy everything at Newegg and pay 40% less for the same computer, minus the flashy case that every twelve-year-old boy wants so much.
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