Starting a Marketing dept within a 150+ company

Posted:
in General Discussion edited January 2014
I just started at this company. I'm the only graphic designer here and we may shift into a whole new marketing department. The company is already at 150+ capacity, with Sales, Customer Service, and even their own in-house IT/Development department.



With the possible shift towards an in-house marketing department, I'm trying to give them the heads up that the art department will need to run on MAC. Unfortunately, they are very ignorant when it comes to MAC and I get an immediate head-shake NO when I just murmur the word Apple to them.



They currently have me on a PC w/ dual monitor. It's probably a under $1,000 PC, single processor, and I get maxed out on multitasking when it comes to Runing Adobe and Macromedia products in parallel. With my Dual G5 at home, I don't have this problem.



The short of this all really is I need some sort of credientials, a strong reference to the efficency of MAC in my realm of duties (print/web design). I think they're afraid because they run all these PC's on a domain base, and it's dynamic for them to sort of control permissions and filters. I think they just don't realize I'm not an entity of their sales/customer service software.



If you have time and want to docture something up, that would be great.

Comments

  • Reply 1 of 12
    furious_furious_ Posts: 88member
    since you just started at the company pushing your case is going to be much harder. best bet would be to make friends. these friends could be then used to help you in your crusade. hope i spelt that right.
  • Reply 2 of 12
    brussellbrussell Posts: 9,812member
    I can't imagine why they'd tell you what computer you have to have. I swear these IT-types get bribes from MS or Dell.
  • Reply 3 of 12
    skatmanskatman Posts: 609member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by domerdel



    With the possible shift towards an in-house marketing department, I'm trying to give them the heads up that the art department will need to run on MAC.



    Why?



    [/quote]

    They currently have me on a PC w/ dual monitor. It's probably a under $1,000 PC, single processor, and I get maxed out on multitasking when it comes to Runing Adobe and Macromedia products in parallel. With my Dual G5 at home, I don't have this problem.

    [/quote]



    Neither does my 3 year old P4 PC.



    Quote:

    The short of this all really is I need some sort of credientials, a strong reference to the efficency of MAC in my realm of duties (print/web design).



    Do you want somebody to selectively tell you why MAC would be better than PC (regardless of whether that is true or not), or do you want somebody to tell you what platform would be the best for the job and integrate well into the company's IT infrastructure?

    The big problem with OSX right now as far as graphic design goes is that Adobe doesn't run in native mode on Intels yet...
  • Reply 4 of 12
    trick falltrick fall Posts: 1,271member
    Quote:

    I can't imagine why they'd tell you what computer you have to have. I swear these IT-types get bribes from MS or Dell.



    Nah, it's just way more hassle for them to have to deal with a Mac. They usually don't know much about macs and there does seem to be a few issues with running macs on a pc network.
  • Reply 5 of 12
    I started at an industrial manufacturing company 3 years ago. All WinXP PCs, except their servers are running Linux and Win2003. My predecessor was running the exact same setup you are on. The day they interviewed me I stressed the importance of running a Mac in the Marketing Dept. I told them I know Windows very well but I wouldn't consider working on a PC to do creative projects. I needed the work but I REALLY don't want to work on Windows all day. They were apprehensive but they really liked my online portfolio so they agreed to give it a try and a new Dual 2GHz G5 with dual ViewSonic 19" LCDs was all setup and ready to go on my first day.



    I was the only Mac there but after the IT guy set it up he said he was so impressed by the awesome engineering of the hardware he wanted to see what the OS could do. So he hung out in my office from time to time. He asked could I call up a terminal for Unix commands and I showed him I could. He typed "grep" into the terminal and was blown away! "Whoa, its just like Linux!" he said. I replied, Linux with a killer GUI and killer apps!



    Since then he bought a PB G4 for himself, an iBook G4 for his wife and tossed Linux and WinXP in favor of using OS X in daily life. He can VPN into the Linux and Windows servers right from his PB at home. He is a total convert to Mac now. He uses his Mac for things I never dreamed of. Now our CEO, VP, Engineering Mgr., 2 Engineers, 3 Sales guys and our Web Developer all have Macs and use them in place of Windows. Plus the CEOs kids wanted Macs and he bought all 3 the Mac of their choice...plus iPods. So you never know. All of these people were downright afraid of Macs before they saw what one could do. One of our tech support guys just got a MacBook Pro and uses Parallels running XP to troubleshoot software on our CNC machines in the field and loves it.



    So in 3 years I have single-handedly converted at least 12 people at work. I say push for the Mac! Don't compromise!
  • Reply 6 of 12
    Quote:

    Originally posted by skatman

    Why?









    Because even though Adobe apps seem identical on the PC they are not. They just feel...clunky compared to the Mac versions. Always have always will.



    Quote:

    They currently have me on a PC w/ dual monitor. It's probably a under $1,000 PC, single processor, and I get maxed out on multitasking when it comes to Runing Adobe and Macromedia products in parallel. With my Dual G5 at home, I don't have this problem.



    Neither does my 3 year old P4 PC.



    That's funny because my 2 year old 3GHz P4 does have problems multitasking compared to my (alleged) slower dual G5. Must be a matter of perception...or whose kool aid you prefer. Obviously you prefer MS kool aid.



    Quote:

    Do you want somebody to selectively tell you why MAC would be better than PC (regardless of whether that is true or not), or do you want somebody to tell you what platform would be the best for the job and integrate well into the company's IT infrastructure?

    The big problem with OSX right now as far as graphic design goes is that Adobe doesn't run in native mode on Intels yet...



    Uh, you can still order G5s brand new from the Apple Store. Quad G5s for that matter that will kick butt with the latest Adobe CS2 apps which ARE optimized for the PowerPC chips. The PowerPC will be just fine for years to come. So that is a lame argument.



    Also, as my previous post stated, we run several Macs on an all-PC network with no glitches whatsoever. There are NO issues. In fact the machines tend to play better together than the Mac and PC fanboys stirring up trouble on the net.



    I'll wait until at least Rev B or C of the new Intel line before I get one but even then the G5 will still be a solid workhorse of a machine. By then all the big apps will be ported Universal anyway. No sweat.
  • Reply 7 of 12
    splinemodelsplinemodel Posts: 7,311member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by skatman

    Why?

    ...

    Neither does my 3 year old P4 PC.

    ...

    The big problem with OSX right now as far as graphic design goes is that Adobe doesn't run in native mode on Intels yet...




    I have a 2 year old PC with 2gigs of memory. My company is about as bull-headed as it gets about Microsoft products. Running InDesign is very slow, and in general Adobe apps run very poorly on Windows. Somehow they run much better on the Mac. If I were primarily a marketeer or designer, I would probably have quit the job one and half years ago, but my primary job function is product design, and it turns out that there are a couple of programs I need that are windows only.



    Additionally, I have some 3D programs that draw their windows and UI entirely with OpenGL. The Mac implementation of OpenGL is one to two orders of magnitude better than the Windows implementation, or so it seems.



    Beyond that, you'll be undoubtedly working with printers and other marketing departments, who will mostly be mac users. When they send you fonts, it's nice to be able to use them. That's the biggest issue.



    You will also become extremely popular when people find out how easy it is for you to turn things into PDFs. (I used to bring my powerbook to work). Yes, you can use Acrobat to do the same thing, but it is slow and at times unpredictable.
  • Reply 8 of 12
    skatmanskatman Posts: 609member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by FoxMulder

    That's funny because my 2 year old 3GHz P4 does have problems multitasking compared to my (alleged) slower dual G5. Must be a matter of perception...or whose kool aid you prefer. Obviously you prefer MS kool aid.



    It has to do with how the software and hardware are setup.



    Quote:

    Uh, you can still order G5s brand new from the Apple Store. Quad G5s for that matter that will kick butt with the latest Adobe CS2 apps which ARE optimized for the PowerPC chips. The PowerPC will be just fine for years to come. So that is a lame argument.



    That is true, however getting a Core Duo machine will be faster even with non-optimized CS2 and Windows.



    Quote:

    Also, as my previous post stated, we run several Macs on an all-PC network with no glitches whatsoever. There are NO issues. In fact the machines tend to play better together than the Mac and PC fanboys stirring up trouble on the net.



    Amen to that... whether your IT guys see it that way or not is another question.



    Quote:

    I'll wait until at least Rev B or C of the new Intel line before I get one but even then the G5 will still be a solid workhorse of a machine. By then all the big apps will be ported Universal anyway. No sweat.



    That's probably your best bet.
  • Reply 9 of 12
    splinemodelsplinemodel Posts: 7,311member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by skatman

    That is true, however getting a Core Duo machine will be faster even with non-optimized CS2 and Windows.





    Are you sure? A lot of people don't give the PPC970 the credit it deserves. It's going to take nothing less than a Xeon 5100 to match it, which is perhaps why Apple didn't release a Core Duo Mac Pro.



    And even then, no Altivec. When doing image processing on large image, you can almost feel Altivec the way you might feel a big turbo spooling up. Supposedly, Intel has grand plans with SSE4, but it's not here yet.
  • Reply 10 of 12
    Quote:

    Originally posted by Splinemodel

    Supposedly, Intel has grand plans with SSE4, but it's not here yet.



    SSE4 comes with the (real) Core architecure, so the Mac Pro will have it with either the Woodcrest or the Conroe.



    http://www.geek.com/news/geeknews/20...0104034055.htm
  • Reply 11 of 12
    nerudaneruda Posts: 427member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by domerdel

    I just started at this company. I'm the only graphic designer here and we may shift into a whole new marketing department. The company is already at 150+ capacity, with Sales, Customer Service, and even their own in-house IT/Development department.





    Why not try the FoxMulder approach and suggest that you would be much more productive/happier on a PMG5? Find the person who is going to be in charge of this new marketing department and plead your case to them.



    You will have much more support for this request in about a year (MacPros+Adobe UB apps+BootcampWindowsXP), so maybe you can try to persuade them at that point.



    Good luck.

    http://www.jcrdesign.com/macsrule.html
  • Reply 12 of 12
    sport73sport73 Posts: 438member
    Take my approach:



    I recently accepted a new job heading a Marketing team for a PC-centric software company.



    When I called to accept, I listed 2 conditions for hire:



    1. Vacation - I had time-off already scheduled less than 2 months after my start, and I didn't want to cancel the trip.



    2. I work on Apple hardware.



    My new 17" MacBook Pro is performing flawlessly and turning heads in the office.
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