Run

becbec
Posted:
in macOS edited January 2014
If I wanted to perform a command like "Run './install'" how would I go about doing that? In Windows it's just Start->Run...but I can't find the equivalent on the Macbook.

Comments

  • Reply 1 of 11
    hypoluxahypoluxa Posts: 627member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by bec

    If I wanted to perform a command like "Run './install'" how would I go about doing that? In Windows it's just Start->Run...but I can't find the equivalent on the Macbook.



    Ohh using the command line of sorts? The mac uses the terminal app, which is in the Utilities folder inside the applications folder. If that is what you are referring to
  • Reply 2 of 11
    Quicksilver has a great plugin for Terminal.app that works great for stuff like this.



    http://docs.blacktree.com/quicksilver/plug-ins/terminal
  • Reply 3 of 11
    becbec Posts: 68member
    Oo, found it!



    But here's the instruction I'm faced with...



    in /usr/bin run the following command from under

    \tthe root account



    \t\t./install





    It doesn't seem to work, possibly because I don't know where that directory is.
  • Reply 4 of 11
    splinemodelsplinemodel Posts: 7,311member
    If you would provide more background, I might be able to help.



    I assume you've already figured out how to enable the root user.
  • Reply 5 of 11
    becbec Posts: 68member




    You see, I'm a complete newbie when it comes to Mac, so assume nothing.



    Basically, I'm trying to install a program but the instructions are a little beyond me. The Terminal App. doesn't want to run these commands so I'm doing something wrong.



    What I have:

    To install hamachi in /usr/bin run the following command from under

    \tthe root account



    \t\t./install



    \tOnce installed you must run 'tuncfg' daemon with root privileges -



    \t\tsudo /sbin/tuncfg



    \tor if you don't have sudo -



    \t\tsu - ; /sbin/tuncfg; exit



    \tHamachi requires one time initialization (per system user account).

    \tThis step generates cryptographic key pair and creates ~/.hamachi

    \tdirectory where Hamachi stores the keys, the configuration and the

    \tstate. To perform this initialization run



    \t\t./hamachi-init



    Any insight you have would be greatly appreciated!
  • Reply 6 of 11
    splinemodelsplinemodel Posts: 7,311member
    When I go home tonight, I'll see if I can install hamachi.
  • Reply 7 of 11
    splinemodelsplinemodel Posts: 7,311member
    whew. . . i'm a little lost in these new forums.



    Setup:

    1. I have a folder on my Desktop called "hamachi"

    2. In it contains the extracted files from the hamachi tar.

    3. My username is "norair"



    Code:




    Welcome to Darwin!

    199:~ norair$ su

    Password:

    199:/Users/norair root# cd /Users/norair/Desktop/hamachi/

    199:/Users/norair/Desktop/hamachi root# ./install



    Copying hamachi into /usr/bin ..

    Creating hamachi-init symlink ..

    Compiling tuncfg ..

    Copying tuncfg into /usr/sbin ..



    Hamachi is installed. See README for what to do next.



    199:/Users/norair/Desktop/hamachi root# exit

    exit

    199:~ norair$ hamachi-init

    Initializing Hamachi configuration (/Users/norair/.hamachi). Please wait ..



    generating 2048-bit RSA keypair .. ok

    making /Users/norair/.hamachi directory .. ok

    saving /Users/norair/.hamachi/client.pub .. ok

    saving /Users/norair/.hamachi/client.pri .. ok

    saving /Users/norair/.hamachi/state .. ok



    Authentication information has been created. Hamachi can now be started with

    'hamachi start' command and then brought online with 'hamachi login'.



    199:~ norair$









    When you type "./" in front of a command, the shell searches for it in the active folder. Otherwise, the shell will search folders from the PATH variable.



    if you type:

    echo $PATH

    you'll see the path folder separated by colons.



    This is standard Bash behavior, and you can edit your path directly in the shell or by going into your .profile file. I wouldn't recommend this unless you have something in mind that you want to add to path.



    One last tip: my favorite thing about Mac OS X's terminal is that you can drag and drop files/folders into it. For example, when I executed "cd /Users/norair/Desktop/hamachi/" I just typed "cd " and then dragged the folder from my desktop to the insertion point. Very painless.
  • Reply 8 of 11
    becbec Posts: 68member
    I was just going to say, "Am I in the right forum?"



    Wow, thanks so much! I'll make an attempt at following this and edit this to let you know if you have a useless case on your hands or not.



    Edit: Houston, we have a problem. I see "Welcome to Darwin!" But beyond that I have:

    Welcome to Darwin!

    bronwyn-coombs-computer:~ bronwyncoombs$



    You might need a beer.
  • Reply 9 of 11
    splinemodelsplinemodel Posts: 7,311member
    That's fine. I probably tweaked my settings somewhere to remove my computer name. The "$" is right where it should be.



    You may want to consult a generic "howto" for Bash.
  • Reply 10 of 11
    becbec Posts: 68member
    Bash for Dummies would be an excellent publication.



    I think -I'll- take the beer and figure out if the program is worth it, haha.



    By the way, the thing you installed (in case you didn't already know) allows you to connect with other iTunes libraries, not just the ones in your immediate range. Or something.
  • Reply 11 of 11
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by bec


    Bash for Dummies would be an excellent publication.



    I think -I'll- take the beer and figure out if the program is worth it, haha.



    By the way, the thing you installed (in case you didn't already know) allows you to connect with other iTunes libraries, not just the ones in your immediate range. Or something.



    Actually hamachi is VPN( virtual private network) program, it creates secure "Local Area Network" over public internet, thats why your iTunes can now find/share music over internet. iTunes thinks the computers are in same local network. Splinemodels instructions look very thorough, he/she just maybe has little bit different settings, but basically every thing that comes after $ or # was something that was given as command. The first thing you see on commandline is your computername, in your case bronwyn-coombs-computer and in Splinemodels case 199, then comes the relative directory you are in. ~ means your home directory. The last thing you propably guessed it's the user who executes that command. "Su username" changes the user, plain "su" is same as "su root", which gives you administrator priviledges.
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