Off Angle Color Shift?

Posted:
in Current Mac Hardware edited January 2014
I am currently in the market for a new laptop, and I have decided to buy a 15.4'' Macbook Pro. I was just at the store looking at all of the LCD's of Apple's various product offerings and noticed some bad color shifts (white to yellow) when viewing off angle on the Macbook Pros (matte), Macbooks, and 17'' iMac. The 17'' iMac is ridiculously bad... especially sitting next to the 20'' which has beautiful colors at any angle. The MacBook Pro is not nearly as bad, but it is worse than the glossy Macbook screen.



Can anyone who has a glossy Macbook Pro comment on the color shift in comparison to the matte screen... similar to the Macbook??



I know it is sort of a nitpick given how nice the colors are viewed head on, but it bothers me enough to question my potential $2,000+ purchase.



Thanks!

Comments

  • Reply 1 of 16
    You seem to be talking only about the screen, is this correct?
  • Reply 2 of 16
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by SpamSandwich


    You seem to be talking only about the screen, is this correct?



    Yes, that is correct. I guess I'm really looking for comments on the off-angle viewing of the Macbook Pro screen... in particular, the color shift.



    Thanks!
  • Reply 3 of 16
    Not another "OH OH Glossy Screen eek eek eek can't cope with it, its totally different to matt screens ah no how do i clean it, ah no its like a mirror, yikes the colour different, lets talk about colour differences and technical crap that no one understands or has little interest in" post.



    Go look at the same picture on each MacBook Pro, one on glossy and matt then just decide which looks better to YOU!! Its your notebook your going to buy so go look and decide for yourself about 'colour shift' that way you can be sure you made the right choice and are happy with it.



    I wish mac users would stop asking about those damn screens, they are the same minus a filter!!!!!!
  • Reply 4 of 16
    chuckerchucker Posts: 5,089member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by ChrisDaMacMan


    Go look at the same picture on each MacBook Pro, one on glossy and matt then just decide which looks better to YOU!! Its your notebook your going to buy so go look and decide for yourself about 'colour shift' that way you can be sure you made the right choice and are happy with it.



    Bingo.
  • Reply 5 of 16
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by ChrisDaMacMan


    Not another "OH OH Glossy Screen eek eek eek can't cope with it, its totally different to matt screens ah no how do i clean it, ah no its like a mirror, yikes the colour different, lets talk about colour differences and technical crap that no one understands or has little interest in" post.



    Go look at the same picture on each MacBook Pro, one on glossy and matt then just decide which looks better to YOU!! Its your notebook your going to buy so go look and decide for yourself about 'colour shift' that way you can be sure you made the right choice and are happy with it.



    I wish mac users would stop asking about those damn screens, they are the same minus a filter!!!!!!



    No, it's NOT another one of "those." I have looked at both the glossy and matte screens, both of which have their positives and negatives. I just hate when LCD's turn yellow as you move off angle. The Macbook Pro with a matte screen seems to to worse in this regard than a Macboook with glossy screen. For this reason, I was leaning towards a Macbook Pro with glossy and was merely asking if anyone could comment on one that had it as I have not seen one yet.
  • Reply 6 of 16
    chuckerchucker Posts: 5,089member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by ShadowX


    No, it's NOT another one of "those."



    Yeah, it is.



    Quote:

    I have looked at both the glossy and matte screens, both of which have their positives and negatives. I just hate when LCD's turn yellow as you move off angle. The Macbook Pro with a matte screen seems to to worse in this regard than a Macboook with glossy screen. For this reason, I was leaning towards a Macbook Pro with glossy and was merely asking if anyone could comment on one that had it as I have not seen one yet.



    A glossy screen will have a higher viewing angle because some of the viewing angle limitations come from the matte filter. It's that simple.



    It's a matter of pick your poison, and someone else's comments will not help you in the least.
  • Reply 7 of 16
    placeboplacebo Posts: 5,767member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Chucker


    Yeah, it is.




    Guess what: you're not him! So be quiet! His post is I believe in reference to the viewing angles of the panels themselves. Apple notebooks use TN panels, which are inferior to the S-IPS technology panels some other companies use and Apple uses in their Cinema displays and iMacs. The coating doesn't change the color shift inherent in TN panels.
  • Reply 8 of 16
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Placebo


    Guess what: you're not him! So be quiet! His post is I believe in reference to the viewing angles of the panels themselves. Apple notebooks use TN panels, which are inferior to the S-IPS technology panels some other companies use and Apple uses in their Cinema displays and iMacs. The coating doesn't change the color shift inherent in TN panels.



    Thanks for your comments - I guess I'll make the long drive to the Apple store to see if they have a glossy MBP I can look at... I'll see if I can live with it... do they even make S-IPS widescreens? Is the 20'' panel used in the iMac S-IPS because that looks great (well, lack of color shift at least... not fond of the "sparkle effect")



    Clucker - I really am not picky over the viewing angle (or the whole matte vs glossy debate) as much as the color of what I can see at an angle... I'd rather have a narrower viewing angle than a yellow cast.
  • Reply 9 of 16
    placeboplacebo Posts: 5,767member
    The panel in the 20" iMac is S-IPS. The 17" I'm not sure about; the Cinema displays are definitely S-IPS.



    I'm not 100% sure the notebooks are TN/M-PVA but by your description they have similar symptoms to what is typcal of those panel types.
  • Reply 10 of 16
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Placebo


    The panel in the 20" iMac is S-IPS. The 17" I'm not sure about; the Cinema displays are definitely S-IPS.



    I'm not 100% sure the notebooks are TN/M-PVA but by your description they have similar symptoms to what is typcal of those panel types.



    That makes sense... the 20'' is great! I went to the Apple store today and finally saw a glossy MBP... that's what I'm getting for sure! Maybe a Cinema display down the road...
  • Reply 11 of 16
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by ShadowX


    No, it's NOT another one of "those."



    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Chucker


    Yeah, it is!



    Damn right it is.



    Why do need to know about all these SPIPSSIIILL-LKK/YYTRR type screens or a TNHMNJIUYGEU-UNENUX screen, they are just complicating a 'personal preference'. All you are going to be doing is looking at this screen for hours a day or for, hopefully, many years to come, your not going to be thinking about the TVHFJEness of it. All you really need to know is that is glossy and that is matt then take a look and decide which you feel is better. knowing the letters of the type screen has no use at all. Except if your a tech and are fixinga screen.



    You damn people are being pedantic about these screens. Apple start using different technology and then you all start worring about it and moaing about it like you little girls. Sometimes i dispair, especially over the 'OMG OMG its shiney how do i clean it', when reading some of the question that people post. Oh well what can you do.
  • Reply 12 of 16
    addaboxaddabox Posts: 12,660member
    The OP was asking about relative off-axis color fidelity. Off-axis color fidelity isn't a "preference" or "opinion", it's a perfectly measurable phenomena which varies from display to display. This is true no matter what the surface coating or gloss level. Move head to side, observe point at which colors begin to shift. Some displays allow quite a bit of latitude, some do not. That's all he was asking about.



    Some of the weirdly belligerent responses here would be akin to someone asking if the iPod HiFi had decent sound at high volume levels getting belittled for wasting everyone's times with their crazy "distortion" and "SPL" talk and accusing them, for no apparent reason, of being obsessed with sampling rates.



    Getting huffy about using technical terms on a computer discussion forum seems a little pointless.
  • Reply 13 of 16
    placeboplacebo Posts: 5,767member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by ChrisDaMacMan


    Damn right it is.



    Why do need to know about all these SPIPSSIIILL-LKK/YYTRR type screens or a TNHMNJIUYGEU-UNENUX screen, they are just complicating a 'personal preference'.



    That's like saying that the horsepower of a car engine is complicating the 'personal preference' of whether you want your car to be high or low performance.
  • Reply 14 of 16
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Placebo


    Guess what: you're not him! So be quiet! His post is I believe in reference to the viewing angles of the panels themselves. Apple notebooks use TN panels, which are inferior to the S-IPS technology panels some other companies use and Apple uses in their Cinema displays and iMacs. The coating doesn't change the color shift inherent in TN panels.



    Is there any reason why Apple are using TN displays in their notebooks rather than S-IPS besides cost? Do S-IPS displays require more power? (They use two transistors per pixel, right?)
  • Reply 15 of 16
    placeboplacebo Posts: 5,767member
    TN I believe scales better to high density.



    Again, I could be entirely wrong, but it sounds like TN or M-PVA.
  • Reply 16 of 16
    jeffdmjeffdm Posts: 12,946member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by ChrisDaMacMan


    Damn right it is.



    Why do need to know about all these SPIPSSIIILL-LKK/YYTRR type screens or a TNHMNJIUYGEU-UNENUX screen, they are just complicating a 'personal preference'. All you are going to be doing is looking at this screen for hours a day or for, hopefully, many years to come, your not going to be thinking about the TVHFJEness of it. All you really need to know is that is glossy and that is matt then take a look and decide which you feel is better. knowing the letters of the type screen has no use at all. Except if your a tech and are fixinga screen.



    Don't be an ass. The crux of Placebo's statements is that Apple is using the same inferior LCD type either way, matte or glossy. The surface texture doesn't change the fact that whites appear yellow when seen off-angle. The only place preference comes in is whether or not you will accept such a drawback.
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