iMovie/iDVD limitations ?

Posted:
in Mac Software edited January 2014
is the max. capture in iMovie only 60 mins.? why? can that be extended?



any other limitations of iMovie that should be kept in mind?



how about iDVD limitations? [other then the fact only apple's internal superdrive works]



???

Comments

  • Reply 1 of 7
    pyr3pyr3 Posts: 946member
    [quote]Originally posted by Badtz:

    <strong>is the max. capture in iMovie only 60 mins.? why? can that be extended?



    any other limitations of iMovie that should be kept in mind?



    how about iDVD limitations? [other then the fact only apple's internal superdrive works]



    ???</strong><hr></blockquote>



    iDVD is like only 60-90 mins of video, I think.



    edit:



    And you can't do chapters, or separate audio tracks (the option of watching one audio track or another with a certain peice of video). If you want to have different audio tracks you have to put the video in twice, once with the one audio track and another time with the other audio track. This is in no way dynamic, and these sort of cripplings are done to make DVD Studio Pro more attractive to professionals



    [ 08-06-2002: Message edited by: pyr3 ]</p>
  • Reply 2 of 7
    xaqtlyxaqtly Posts: 450member
    iDVD 2 is limited to 90 minutes, and it's limited to 4 buttons per screen (but you can do sub menus also)and a single audio track that isn't adjustable in iDVD. But that's per button... so it's not like you can only have one piece of music on the entire DVD.



    And yes, its like that for two reasons: One, to make it exceedingly simple to use, and it is. Two, so that it doesn't conflict with DVD Studio Pro. FWIW, iDVD suits almost all my needs for making DVDs, and I think that's what Apple was aiming for.
  • Reply 3 of 7
    gordygordy Posts: 970member
    I did an iDVD project last week with 6 buttons, text only.



    One iMovie limitation is that it breaks captured footage into segments. I forget the limit of these segments.



    Also, be sure to disable your sleep settings, or you'll screw up both apps.



    Otherwise, I find both to be great apps, with workarounds for every missing feature I didn't mention.
  • Reply 4 of 7
    pyr3pyr3 Posts: 946member
    [quote]Originally posted by Xaqtly:

    <strong>iDVD 2 is limited to 90 minutes, and it's limited to 4 buttons per screen (but you can do sub menus also)and a single audio track that isn't adjustable in iDVD. But that's per button... so it's not like you can only have one piece of music on the entire DVD.



    And yes, its like that for two reasons: One, to make it exceedingly simple to use, and it is. Two, so that it doesn't conflict with DVD Studio Pro. FWIW, iDVD suits almost all my needs for making DVDs, and I think that's what Apple was aiming for.</strong><hr></blockquote>





    When I was talking about audio tracks I meant like separate audio tracks that will over lay the same video. Like two different languages, or a director's commentary. That sort of thing. The only way to do this in iDVD is to import two MPEG2 files, one with the one audio track and one with the other. Even though the video is the same you would have to have it twice on the DVD as opposed to the way that regular DVDs work where you can just choose the audio track that you want to play with the video and only have to include the video once.
  • Reply 5 of 7
    jimdadjimdad Posts: 209member
    [quote]Originally posted by gordy:

    <strong>I did an iDVD project last week with 6 buttons, text only.



    One iMovie limitation is that it breaks captured footage into segments. I forget the limit of these segments.



    Also, be sure to disable your sleep settings, or you'll screw up both apps.



    Otherwise, I find both to be great apps, with workarounds for every missing feature I didn't mention.</strong><hr></blockquote>



    Gordy, I think the breaking into segments is intended as a bonus as it marks different shots taken on the camera - each new segment comes after you have hit the pause button at the end of a shot. This saves the tedious task of splitting up a huge chunk of film into manageable clips to work with.
  • Reply 6 of 7
    imacfpimacfp Posts: 750member
    [quote]Originally posted by jimdad:

    <strong>



    Gordy, I think the breaking into segments is intended as a bonus as it marks different shots taken on the camera - each new segment comes after you have hit the pause button at the end of a shot. This saves the tedious task of splitting up a huge chunk of film into manageable clips to work with.</strong><hr></blockquote>



    \tThat is what they have it for, but it would be nice if they allowed you to turn that feature off. It can cause problems when you have long spans of video that need to stay together.
  • Reply 7 of 7
    badtzbadtz Posts: 949member
    When using the DV camcorder, everytime I stop the video then restart it, will iMovie automatically make that it's own "segment" when imported?



    is there anyway to overdub your own commentary over video in iMovie?



    What's the maximum video length can iMovie import/use?



    Is the audio re-encoded when imported into iMovie? While the movie uses a CBR for encoding?



    For DVDs, can one DVD hold a variable amount of video [depending on encoding method] or is it always going to be the same maximum amount per DVD disk?



    thanks for all the help so far
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