$10,000 Software Prize

Posted:
in General Discussion edited January 2014
A friend and I have been discussing the XP on a Mac prize that was started back in January, and my friend believes that the unique circumstances of that particular situation make recreating it to find another interesting but difficult technical solution unlikely. In fact, he said he'd offer to match the first $10,000 in donations anyone else contributed to the prize on top of a little side wager we've got going on. I need help coming up with a prize meets his criteria, though:



A) It must be legal. (Otherwise, cracking Apple's or Microsoft's DRM would be perfect.)

B) It must be achievable in six months

C) It can't require onerous amounts of capital to participate

D) It must excite the imagination of enough of the public that some would be interested in contributing to the prize.



Please help me prove my friend wrong, win our bet and help the world find a useful solution to a problem. What do you think would make a good challenge?

Comments

  • Reply 1 of 12
    This is one of those things that's not going to attract as much attention, because XP already runs on the Mac quite nicely. Regardless of $10,000 offer, there's not going to be as much interest.
  • Reply 2 of 12
    The goal isn't to create another method of running XP on the Mac, but a completely different challenge that would stir up similar interest as the previous prize.
  • Reply 3 of 12
    placeboplacebo Posts: 5,767member
    That's the stupidest idea I've ever heard. "Guys let's do something for money even when there's really nothing that necessary that comes to mind"
  • Reply 4 of 12
    Alright, Mr. Bitter. . . .



    Now that I have a better idea of the original motive, I'll say that it's certainly a fine idea. A lot of companies host promotional development contests, so there's certainly nothing wrong with the idea.



    As more of a hardware guy myself, if I were to offer the prize, I'd make it iPod-related. It would also be nice to be able to run Xilinx development software on the x86 mac, or for that matter ANY sort of CAD/EDA software. Many of these programs have Linux versions, but I have no idea if they'd run on the mac via the X-server interface. The fact that I don't have an x86 mac of course limits my ability to explore this at all.
  • Reply 5 of 12
    placeboplacebo Posts: 5,767member
    I'm not being Mr. Bitter, it's just that the idea isn't new while at the same time the thread doesn't suggest anything new.
  • Reply 6 of 12
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Placebo


    I'm not being Mr. Bitter, it's just that the idea isn't new while at the same time the thread doesn't suggest anything new.



    yes you are Mr. Bitter. Offer some suggestions instead of posting "oh this is really stupid. why would anybody do that. sarcastic remark. end post"



    the thread doesn't suggest anything new precisely because he's asking for suggestions.



    now, as for the original topic... how about hacking an iPod to include a GPS feature? unlikely?
  • Reply 7 of 12
    MarvinMarvin Posts: 14,436moderator
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by monkeyastronaut


    how about hacking an iPod to include a GPS feature? unlikely?



    That's a good one, I've thought that would be quite nice myself because I don't like the idea of having a clumsy device just for GPS. The trouble is you have to build a hardware receiver. I reckon a software-only challenge would be more accessible to people.



    One of the big ones that people go on about it being able to run Windows games on a Mac without Windows. Parallels is supposed to be bringing 3D into their virtualization but I'm guessing those games will still be limited to the Ram and resources of the virtual machine. It would likely be very difficult though.
  • Reply 8 of 12
    It's my understanding that the biggest hurdle to creating software for the iPod is that Apple hasn't released a SDK. Can an SDK be reverse engineered? How difficult would it be? Could a few motivated individuals do it, or would it require the resources of a company?
  • Reply 9 of 12
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Nobody Special


    It's my understanding that the biggest hurdle to creating software for the iPod is that Apple hasn't released a SDK. Can an SDK be reverse engineered? How difficult would it be? Could a few motivated individuals do it, or would it require the resources of a company?



    I know that there's an iPod Linux project that has borne fruit. Google should be able to find it for you.



    Personally, I've been wanting to put together a hackers' guide to the cradle port. I'd be doing that now, but first I need to design an ultra-low-power LowFER SDR. This is for a submerged sensor some friends are working on. After that, it's iPod hack time.
  • Reply 10 of 12
    I also think a Macromedia Flash player on iPod would be nice too.
  • Reply 11 of 12
    I know this is not really sexy, but how about getting Classic to run on Intel machines? My school uses a number of programs that are classic only, but which obviously thus don't run on new Apple hardware. I know t other educators that are in the same boat. In my own class, I've had to change a couple of my lessons since I can now longer have my students look at programs that used to run.
  • Reply 12 of 12
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by gruth


    I know this is not really sexy, but how about getting Classic to run on Intel machines? My school uses a number of programs that are classic only, but which obviously thus don't run on new Apple hardware. I know t other educators that are in the same boat. In my own class, I've had to change a couple of my lessons since I can now longer have my students look at programs that used to run.



    Google SheepShaver.
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