Quick Quotation Help!!!

Posted:
in AppleOutsider edited January 2014
Help!



If you are quoting just a part of a sentence, like a expert for instance, does the period fall outside or inside the end quote?



For instances:



Jane and Bob went to the mall and saw a sign that said "90% off all firewood".



OR



Jane and Bob went to the mall and saw a sign that said "90% off all firewood."

Comments

  • Reply 1 of 16
    Inside the quote.
  • Reply 2 of 16
    Inside.





    Good luck on the paper; what time is it due?



  • Reply 3 of 16
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Bergermeister


    Inside.





    Good luck on the paper; what time is it due?







    But isn't it my period, not the quotes? haha. my period. LOL. But I was actually serious about that question <<... the poem continues without period... so why does the period go inside the quote?



    Tomorrow. But I am just editing, rough draft I did on Monday.



    Thanks!
  • Reply 4 of 16
    inside...



    because we don't follow british rules....
  • Reply 5 of 16
    midwintermidwinter Posts: 10,060member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by icfireball


    Help!



    If you are quoting just a part of a sentence, like a expert for instance, does the period fall outside or inside the end quote?



    For instances:



    Jane and Bob went to the mall and saw a sign that said "90% off all firewood".



    OR



    Jane and Bob went to the mall and saw a sign that said "90% off all firewood."





    If you are an American, it goes inside the quote.



    If you are English, it goes outside.
  • Reply 6 of 16
    midwintermidwinter Posts: 10,060member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by icfireball


    But isn't it my period, not the quotes? haha. my period. LOL. But I was actually serious about that question <<... the poem continues without period... so why does the period go inside the quote?



    Tomorrow. But I am just editing, rough draft I did on Monday.



    Thanks!



    Now you've thrown a wrench in the works. If you are citing a poem and the line continues past what you're quoting, you should say "blah blah blah . . ." (CITATION). The ellipsis ". . ." indicates that the line continues. The period after the citation ends the sentence.
  • Reply 7 of 16
    How I got through / failed english was forget the f-ing period and go riding.

    I guess it all depends on what grade you want to see.

    flick.
  • Reply 8 of 16
    Here in the United Kingdom, we believe that the full stop (or 'period', as it is known in the North American colonies) should be the last thing in the sentence.



    I dreamed of fireballs last night.
  • Reply 9 of 16
    MarvinMarvin Posts: 14,230moderator
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by midwinter


    If you are an American, it goes inside the quote.



    If you are English, it goes outside.



    If you're an American, you can probably put the period anywhere. I've discovered Americans can do what they like with spelling and punctuation. Go nuts and put it right at the start. Who knows you might start a religion.



    It should go outside the quotes no matter where you live because you are finishing the sentence not the quote. It's a pretty logical model and programming scope follows the same convention.
  • Reply 10 of 16
    Freedom. Of. Use.

    Break. The. Rules.

    Think. Different.

    ! ! !





    Canadians put the period inside (as do Americans):

    http://www.arts.uottawa.ca/writcent/...ar/qmarks.html



    A British site:

    http://www.informatics.susx.ac.uk/do...00000000000000



    Purdue University on the matter:

    http://owl.english.purdue.edu/handou.../g_overvw.html
  • Reply 11 of 16
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Marvin


    If you're an American, you can probably put the period anywhere. I've discovered Americans can do what they like with spelling and punctuation. Go nuts and put it right at the start. Who knows you might start a religion.



    It should go outside the quotes no matter where you live because you are finishing the sentence not the quote. It's a pretty logical model and programming scope follows the same convention.



    Just because Americans don't make soda cans out of "aluminium" doesn't mean that American English is without rules.
  • Reply 12 of 16
    Just for the record:



    GW Bush does not speak American English. Linguists are stumped as to what he speaks, but have narrowed it down to either a member of the Gibberish family or the Bullshit family. It may, however, be a new family, Gibberish Bullshit.



    That being said, American English does have rules, but many take great liberties with the rules.
  • Reply 13 of 16
    midwintermidwinter Posts: 10,060member
    I don't know why anyone finds it odd that English is such a seemingly random and confusing language. It *is*. English is a real mutt of a language—I always say "English is the kind of language that roughs up other languages in dark alleys and rifles through their pockets for loose grammar and vocabulary."



    American English is no more erratic or arbitrary than British English/RP. The rules are no more unusual. Hell, there a dialects in Germany that are nearly (if not entirely) unintelligible to people from other regions. Even though France has l'Acadamie to protect the language from corruption, words are going to make their way in, and I'd be stunned if there weren't significant differences between dialects in Brittany versus Provence versus Paris.
  • Reply 14 of 16
    Midwinter has a very good point. Especially for a country as large as the US is, to have one single, centralized language is virtually impossible and not necessarily desirable. Language is alive and dynamic and grows and changes as we, the people who use it, grow and change and adapt to the palces we choose to live in.



    Where I live in Japan, there are divisions in the same city (it has recently annexed a few bordering towns) that speak different dialects from each other to a degree that communication can be difficult. All in a 10-mile radius.
  • Reply 15 of 16
    midwintermidwinter Posts: 10,060member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Bergermeister


    Midwinter has a very good point. Especially for a country as large as the US is, to have one single, centralized language is virtually impossible and not necessarily desirable. Language is alive and dynamic and grows and changes as we, the people who use it, grow and change and adapt to the palces we choose to live in.



    Where I live in Japan, there are divisions in the same city (it has recently annexed a few bordering towns) that speak different dialects from each other to a degree that communication can be difficult. All in a 10-mile radius.



    In England, dialects are often town-specific. Small towns existed in effective isolation for centuries, and so someone from one town will speak a different dialect than someone not far away in the next town.
  • Reply 16 of 16
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Bergermeister


    Just for the record:



    GW Bush does not speak American English. Linguists are stumped as to what he speaks, but have narrowed it down to either a member of the Gibberish family or the Bullshit family. It may, however, be a new family, Gibberish Bullshit.





    "Armadillas love to dig the soil lookin' for bugs.



    ...and...



    ...So I went out there the other day, and there was Barney...



    ...buried in this hole,



    ...chasing an armadilla."



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