Legal rights in Garage Band

Posted:
in Mac Software edited January 2014
OK, big stupid question here, cause I can't find the EULA for GB, and probably couldn't read it even if I could:



Do users of GarageBand have the right to sell commercially, without paying royalty fees, works using GB loops? In other words, do I get to be a real band, or am I just a poseur with a cool toy (from a legal perspective that is.. we'll withold judgement on other interpretations. )?

Comments

  • Reply 1 of 10
    irelandireland Posts: 17,793member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Celemourn View Post


    OK, big stupid question here, cause I can't find the EULA for GB, and probably couldn't read it even if I could:



    Do users of GarageBand have the right to sell commercially, without paying royalty fees, works using GB loops? In other words, do I get to be a real band, or am I just a poseur with a cool toy (from a legal perspective that is.. we'll withold judgement on other interpretations. )?



    They are all copyright free!!!
  • Reply 2 of 10
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Ireland View Post


    They are all copyright free!!!



    eh... COPYRIGHT free, or ROYALTY free?
  • Reply 3 of 10
    irelandireland Posts: 17,793member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Celemourn View Post


    eh... COPYRIGHT free, or ROYALTY free?



    Same same.
  • Reply 4 of 10
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Ireland View Post


    Same same.



    Ok, gotcha. But they're not really. ;D
  • Reply 5 of 10
    irelandireland Posts: 17,793member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Celemourn View Post


    Ok, gotcha. But they're not really. ;D



    You can't get royalties on music that's not copyrighted. I should know, I made an album with my old band and rang the trademark office to find it out.
  • Reply 6 of 10
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Ireland View Post


    You can't get royalties on music that's not copyrighted. I should know, I made an album with my old band and rang the trademark office to find it out.



    And yet, music, such as loops, MAY be offered for sale without requiring the purchaser to pay royalty fees, while still retaining the sole right to produce and sell the loops for yourself.



    I'm noting the difference between public domain and stock/royalty free materials. For example, do I have the legal right to burn copies of a Jam Pack and sell them? That right belongs to the copyright holder. Royalty-free I'm interpreting as the copyright holder giving me permission, once I've paid the original fee, to use his or her IP in my own work in a derivative fashion.
  • Reply 7 of 10
    irelandireland Posts: 17,793member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Celemourn View Post


    And yet, music, such as loops, MAY be offered for sale without requiring the purchaser to pay royalty fees, while still retaining the sole right to produce and sell the loops for yourself.



    I'm noting the difference between public domain and stock/royalty free materials. For example, do I have the legal right to burn copies of a Jam Pack and sell them? That right belongs to the copyright holder. Royalty-free I'm interpreting as the copyright holder giving me permission, once I've paid the original fee, to use his or her IP in my own work in a derivative fashion.



    Is that what you really intended doing? Selling CD's of Apple's Garage Loops? Let me know when you sell three copies. I'm guessing time travel will be out by then. Just do what you want with the loops, goodbye.
  • Reply 8 of 10
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Ireland View Post


    Is that what you really intended doing? Selling CD's of Apple's Garage Loops? Let me know when you sell three copies. I'm guessing time travel will be out by then. Just do what you want with the loops, goodbye.



    Lol, no. That was to make the point that royalty free != copyright free.



    I do appreciate the answer.
  • Reply 9 of 10
    irelandireland Posts: 17,793member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Celemourn View Post


    Lol, no. That was to make the point that royalty free != copyright free.



    I do appreciate the answer.



    You're welcome.
  • Reply 10 of 10
    I've already heard numerous commercials on TV that have used "stock" Apple loops to make the soundtrack. It's kind of embarrassing actually, when I notice the musician hasn't really done sufficient work to make an original piece of music.
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