Got YDL - now what should I do with it?

Posted:
in Mac Software edited January 2014
I just downloaded Yellow Dog Linux version 2.3 as well as detailed step-by-step instructions on how to install it. The only question is, what is it useful for, and what computer should I install it on? I do have a thrown-together Frankenmac - the case of a 7500, a 7600 motherboard, 152 MB of RAM, 9 GB hard drive, G3/400 processor, and a Rage 128 PCI. Would this be good for YDL or is it not even worth using?

Comments

  • Reply 1 of 5
    Dude, that machine blows my 292mhz g3 powerbook (with ati rage pro w/ 4MB vram! Eat your heart out TiBook 1ghz users!) out of the water! Install it already!



    As a newbie, you might as well install everything, unless you know what you want/need and what you don't want/need.
  • Reply 2 of 5
    Normally, people first decide what they're going to use something for, then they downlaod/acquire it



    YDL works well as a server or rendering node, and I imagine it would be fine as a LinuxOnDesktop machine. Personally, I think linux is suited for server use, but if you would like to humor all the linux on desktop advocates, go ahead



    Were you planning on installing YDL to learn linux or to actually use it as a desktop machine or server? Answer those questions and you'll have a better idea as to what packages you need to install...
  • Reply 3 of 5
    I use mine as a web proxy (caching and filtering using squid and privoxy, respectively), web server and desktop machine simultaneously. Meaning my web browser, galeon, (the k-raddest browser ever!) that I'm now using is hooked up via loopback to privoxy for filtering which is chained to squid for DNS caching among other things. Soon, all these will be chained to a Netfilter firewall. All on the same machine, running concurrently.



    All servers (privoxy, ssh, whatever) of course running in the background, starting upon bootup, before I even log in.



    I run usually one X session, sometimes several simultaneously (ie: rupert, Mac on Linux, root, etc)



    So what I'm getting at is you don't need to have one specific purpose in mind.



    You can do it all!



    At once!!!



    Neat!!!!

    :cool:



    [ 11-15-2002: Message edited by: stimuli ]</p>
  • Reply 4 of 5
    lucaluca Posts: 3,833member
    Well, here's one idea I was tossing around in my head:



    I recently discovered remote login in OS X, which seems really cool. However, it also seems about as close to useless as possible, because the only thing you can do is log in from a command line terminal. I have the 7500/7600 at home but it can't really run OS X without hacking, which I don't want to do. So I thought maybe I could put Linux on it to get the command line terminal. That would allow me to remotely log in to my computer from home (provided it's not sleeping, right?) and move stuff over to my home.



    I suppose I'm also wondering if there's an easier way to remotely login and do stuff, and I also want to know if you can shut off the computer remotely (I can leave it on temporarily on a basic black screen saver, but it makes noise when on and I don't want to keep my roommate awake all weekend).



    Any hints for doing this sort of thing? I am planning to use OS 9 most of the time, but I may as well try Linux out.
  • Reply 5 of 5
    [QUOTE]Originally posted by Luca Rescigno:

    <strong>That would allow me to remotely log in to my computer from home (provided it's not sleeping, right?)

    </strong>



    do a google search for "wake on lan", I think most mac hardware supports it. You get a program and tell it your ip and MAC address and it sends a special signal to your computer to wake it up remotely.



    I think this was mentioned a macosxhints too, with some good info in the feedback section.



    <strong>

    I suppose I'm also wondering if there's an easier way to remotely login and do stuff

    </strong>



    If all you need is access to files then the command line should be fine, though you could use transmit 2 or fugu if you need a gui for sftp / ssh. (Use PuTTY on windows).



    <strong>

    I also want to know if you can shut off the computer remotely (I can leave it on temporarily on a basic black screen saver, but it makes noise when on and I don't want to keep my roommate awake all weekend).

    </strong>



    If you've got wake-on-lan then you could set energy saver (or the linux equivalent) to power down the computer.
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