Apple's own site offers hints of whats to come...

Posted:
in macOS edited January 2014
http://www.apple.com/macosx/leopard/coreanimation.html



Watch that, pause when a keynote presentation style note comes up: entitled, "Core Animation: Experiences in Motion"



Now, answer this question: Core Animation is made specifically for eye candy, right? Then why is this used with both Time Machine AND Spaces?



Hmmm

Comments

  • Reply 1 of 2
    mdriftmeyermdriftmeyer Posts: 7,194member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Macintosh_Next View Post


    http://www.apple.com/macosx/leopard/coreanimation.html



    Watch that, pause when a keynote presentation style note comes up: entitled, "Core Animation: Experiences in Motion"



    Now, answer this question: Core Animation is made specifically for eye candy, right? Then why is this used with both Time Machine AND Spaces?



    Hmmm



    Any company that needs Time Modeling albeit from Games, to FEA/CAD/CAM/ to Motion Pictures, etc., will leverage it; and the fact that OpenGL and Core Animation work together means a lot of heavy lifting for AutoDesk and others is already done.
  • Reply 2 of 2
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Macintosh_Next View Post


    Now, answer this question: Core Animation is made specifically for eye candy, right? Then why is this used with both Time Machine AND Spaces?



    Core Animation is definitely not "made specifically for eye candy". Instead, it brings capabilities which used to be only available in the window server's domain to application views. For example, the window server can efficiently composite two overlapping windows and move them around without invoking redraws on the windows as parts of them are exposed or hidden. But, inside of a window, application developers don't get that kind of functionality for free. If someone wanted to create a custom view that displayed image thumbnails, they would have to write all the code to layout the thumbnails, cache images to avoid redraw, handle overlaps, and so on. OpenGL acceleration and animation would be extra work. Core Animation solves all that by providing that kind functionality at the view level with a simple API. In fact, if you watch Session 200 from WWDC 2006 (which I believe is available to online members now), you'll find that Core Animation wasn't always called Core Animation. Its original name is more indicative of how it actually affects applications. Animation just turns out to be ridiculously simple once that other thing is worked out. Core Animation is really applicable to every application, regardless of whether or not it is animated.
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