Apple! Where's my iLife and iWork 07!

Posted:
in Mac Software edited January 2014
Dammit.



Don't even try to tell me these are Leopard only.

Comments

  • Reply 1 of 18
    icfireballicfireball Posts: 2,594member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by hmurchison View Post


    Dammit.



    Don't even try to tell me these are Leopard only.



    Lol. No one ever said iLife needed to be updated once a year. Microshit updates their productivity suite every 4 years about... LOL.



    Granted that Apple still has a lot of work to do with iWork...
  • Reply 2 of 18
    hmurchisonhmurchison Posts: 12,268member
    Yeah.



    Thought the boards needed a bit of hyperbole. I'm a bit shocked though. I never figured iLife/iWork would be reliant on Leopard (my assumption...I don't know for a fact).



    I like dinking around in Pages and Keynote. I figure Pages will definitely take a large leap(ard) forward and Keynote will see substantial animation improvements. I just need more memory to take advantage of this and iLife which should be some good stuff.



    I personally don't think Leopard will take as long as October so I'll plan on Leopard being ready by early September.
  • Reply 3 of 18
    mbaynhammbaynham Posts: 534member
    i know. i was going to buy it for school in january when i presumed it would be out. but seeing as ive only got 3 weeks left, i dont really see the point. o well, saves me a bit of money.
  • Reply 4 of 18
    Well, I remember some article a month or so ago saying that the '0X was going to come off of the name and it was instead going to be released as something like iLife Leopard and iWork Leopard. So, instead of those being program suites separate from the OS, they would become more Part of the OS. But, that's just what I remember reading and if I didn't remember reading that, then it's a good idea?
  • Reply 5 of 18
    frank777frank777 Posts: 5,789member
    iLife I can understand. But how on earth can a spreadsheet program require Leopard to run?



    This smacks of trying to mollify Microsoft once again.
  • Reply 6 of 18
    crentistcrentist Posts: 204member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by jtrwallace View Post


    Well, I remember some article a month or so ago saying that the '0X was going to come off of the name and it was instead going to be released as something like iLife Leopard and iWork Leopard. So, instead of those being program suites separate from the OS, they would become more Part of the OS. But, that's just what I remember reading and if I didn't remember reading that, then it's a good idea?



    After having rewatched the Leopard Preview at WWDC06, I am inclined to think that Apple is shifting toward a all or none software philosophy. When Steve started talking about shipping "the complete package" (42 min mark) of apple software like Front Row, PhotoBooth, BootCamp, etc. "software that only ships on new macs," I got the impression he wasn't just talking about these three. He mentioned that these were JUST three examples of how they are shipping the complete package with Leopard. Only the most recent version of iLife ships on new macs as well. . . .



    Although I understand that a lot of people, myself included, would love to be able to update just the iApps if needed (independent of an OS upgrade), I am feeling that the "complete package" might just be incorporating iLife and iWork into the OS upgrade cycle, to also be upgraded every couple of years.



    My greatest concern if this were the case would be whether Apple holds to the $129 upgrade cost or if they would need to compensate for loss in iLife/iWork sales by charging something more like $150+. Although what a sell if they can keep the "complete package" at $129 - that would make for a compelling OS upgrade.



    Thoughts?
  • Reply 7 of 18
    hmurchisonhmurchison Posts: 12,268member
    If Apple decides to include iLife and iWork updates in the package then $149.99 would be an absolute steal. $199 would be appropriate.



    The advantages are millions of new iWork users and a majority of people using the current iWork version. The question we should be asking is "what is in it for Apple?"



    If Apple is waiting for Leopard to deliver a new iLife and iWork then my hypothetical would be this.



    Apple will roll out the new iLife and iWork with Leopard only features. At this time Apple will also roll out a new massively updated .mac service which is now going to be broken into tiered services. There will be a $5 per month basic email/iDisk account. A $8 per month service that adds more features and then a $12 per month Premium account with a boatload of features and services.



    This way Apple can monitize the software development by attaching the more profitable .mac services. iWork and iLife generate small one time profit and that's only for those that choose to upgrade. The more lucrative strategy is to deliver enough value add features to .mac that entangles customers into perpetual use. There's a saying that goes "A dollar everyday is better than 10 now and then" .mac monthly subscription fees are more lucrative in the long run.



    What's going to fuel this .mac upgrade. Web 2.0. Expect heavy usage of AJAX, Webojects and javascript frameworks like Prototype to deliver web applications from .mac. I don't know what features Apple will add to .mac in support of iWork but iLife is just ripe for expanded functionality. Leopards improved sync services and Calendar frameworks could also play a vital role. The goal is a functional environment where the lines between computer and web are blurred. Apple is not going to go Flash..their champion is AJAX and CSS3.



    This is why we're likely waiting for iLife/iWork. Chances are Apple could deliver Tiger versions but it's becoming clear that they will go to more extreme lengths to promote "Leopard Only" applications. Which include special promotion



    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Paul Kafasis


    As well, at the Leopard Tech Talks Apple put on, they were really lobbying hard for developers to go Leopard-only, promising promotional opportunities.



    Can you now see how Apple is trying to move as much of the platform to Leopard as quickly as possible? If iWork and iLife have to get tossed into the mix for bait...Apple will do it IMO.
  • Reply 8 of 18
    pbpb Posts: 4,233member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by icfireball View Post


    Lol. No one ever said iLife needed to be updated once a year.



    Apple did. By attaching the year to the software name. Of course this is not an update contract but for the average mind it means that there are updates every year. They will probably drop this naming scheme with Leopard, so that everyone relates iLife with the OS and not with the year.
  • Reply 9 of 18
    irelandireland Posts: 17,584member
    If I had to take a stab at what Leopard will cost I would say $179, and yes I think both life and work of the "i" variety will be part of the OS. I wouldn't be too shocked at a $199 cost though, I would be shocked however at a $129 price tag.
  • Reply 10 of 18
    hmurchisonhmurchison Posts: 12,268member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Ireland View Post


    If I had to take a stab at what Leopard will cost I would say $179, and yes I think both life and work of the "i" variety will be part of the OS. I wouldn't be too shocked at a $199 cost though, I would be shocked however at a $129 price tag.



    Sounds plausible. People are going to complain at anything over $129 but if Apple could deliver a Leopard+iWork+iLife bundle to me for $179 I'd be ok with that personally as long as iWork becomes a more full featured application.
  • Reply 11 of 18
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by hmurchison View Post


    If Apple is waiting for Leopard to deliver a new iLife and iWork then my hypothetical would be this.



    Apple will roll out the new iLife and iWork with Leopard only features. At this time Apple will also roll out a new massively updated .mac service which is now going to be broken into tiered services. There will be a $5 per month basic email/iDisk account. A $8 per month service that adds more features and then a $12 per month Premium account with a boatload of features and services.



    This way Apple can monitize the software development by attaching the more profitable .mac services. iWork and iLife generate small one time profit and that's only for those that choose to upgrade. The more lucrative strategy is to deliver enough value add features to .mac that entangles customers into perpetual use. There's a saying that goes "A dollar everyday is better than 10 now and then" .mac monthly subscription fees are more lucrative in the long run.



    What's going to fuel this .mac upgrade. Web 2.0. Expect heavy usage of AJAX, Webojects and javascript frameworks like Prototype to deliver web applications from .mac. I don't know what features Apple will add to .mac in support of iWork but iLife is just ripe for expanded functionality. Leopards improved sync services and Calendar frameworks could also play a vital role. The goal is a functional environment where the lines between computer and web are blurred. Apple is not going to go Flash..their champion is AJAX and CSS3.



    This is why we're likely waiting for iLife/iWork. Chances are Apple could deliver Tiger versions but it's becoming clear that they will go to more extreme lengths to promote "Leopard Only" applications. Which include special promotion



    Can you now see how Apple is trying to move as much of the platform to Leopard as quickly as possible? If iWork and iLife have to get tossed into the mix for bait...Apple will do it IMO.



    There is another possibility: going Web 2.0 with iWork and .mac accounts.



    Apple could offer the iWork suite as a part of a subscription service and make them web apps like Google's.
  • Reply 12 of 18
    sport73sport73 Posts: 438member
    My bet is on:



    $199 for Leopard with iLife/iWork

    - includes Numbers, Pages, Keynote and iLife apps

    $239 for the Family Pack
  • Reply 13 of 18
    crentistcrentist Posts: 204member
    I'm thinking 179 and 229 for the single license and family pack license. Again, Apple has every reason to do this integration: less pressure to upgrade iLife suite every single year, more of a commitment from their users to be using the latest OS and using the hardware that will fully run the latest OS, and the fact that this really puts that much more pressure on Microsoft to deliver an operating system upgrade that is so all-encompassing and alive with features. Kind of an in your face moment when thinking of some of the things (microsoft's photo manager comes to mind) that MS is trying to incorporate into their systems as well.



    What would take the cake, and what I predict, is that sleeping giant iWork. Integration of iWork in addition to iLife, especially an updated version of such, is really going to open peoples eyes to new ways of doing things on their macs.



    *On a side note, I don't think Apple is trying to kill office. Personally, I don't think that the Office suite is going anywhere anytime soon (for the most part it is a decent solution) but allowing people the freedom of coming to the mac and not having to instantly add a few hundred extra bucks to the Mac's purchase price for a standard (not the education copy that most illegally buy) copy of Office makes the switch a little sweeter.



    Back to iWork, the killer plus for bundling iWork with Leopard is that it is that much easier to integrate iWork functionality into other Leopard-dependent technologies. Imagine having an iPhone with a Preview-like app that can read pages/word/excel/numbers/powerpoint/keynote files. Ballmer's size 11's would quickly find their way into his mouth on that one. The iPhone would instantly become the ultimate study/work aid for those in the home, education, and business markets.



    Oh, and I think that Apple will then officially drop the name "iLife" and "iWork" and just tout the included apps as part of "Mac OS X"
  • Reply 14 of 18
    majordudemajordude Posts: 17member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by crentist View Post


    Oh, and I think that Apple will then officially drop the name "iLife" and "iWork" and just tout the included apps as part of "Mac OS X"



    Well, what all companies should do is make their product names a bit more evergreen. Office 2004 sounds outdated. iWork 2006 is old...



    Why not Office 4 or iWork 7 or something?



    Windows 98 or 2000 sounded old in 2002. XP? What the hell is an XP? They rode that for five years. People forget it has been around that long unless the stupid moniker reminds you every time you start it up!
  • Reply 15 of 18
    javacowboyjavacowboy Posts: 814member
    How likely is it that the next version of iLife will include a spreadsheet?
  • Reply 16 of 18
    irelandireland Posts: 17,584member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by JavaCowboy View Post


    How likely is it that the next version of iLife will include a spreadsheet?



    That's unpossible.
  • Reply 17 of 18
    tokentoken Posts: 142member
    We know a lot of the new features and UI changes in the upcoming Office 2008. To my best knowledge, practically nothing of the next version of iWork.



    Can anyone offer any known info or kindly summarize what has been rumored??
  • Reply 18 of 18
    hmurchisonhmurchison Posts: 12,268member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Token View Post


    We know a lot of the new features and UI changes in the upcoming Office 2008. To my best knowledge, practically nothing of the next version of iWork.



    Can anyone offer any known info or kindly summarize what has been rumored??



    A seperate spreadsheet component. Possibly a simple DB app and hopefully expanded drawing tools as well.
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