.MAC required for easy web page publishing?

Posted:
in Mac Software edited January 2014
Hi,,,,



I am thinking of purchasing my first mac - a macbook.



I like the ease that the store salesman describes creating webpages (a lot of drag drop with other apple programs).



I asked him if .mac was necessary to get the easy publishing and he was very hesitant but said yes.



Is there a way to publish easily without having to may for a .mac account? He tried to tell me that I already pay for an ISP so I would just be paying .mac instead. I thought .mac was a hosting site that I would pay in addition to my ISP.



Help please



Comments

  • Reply 1 of 7
    normheadnormhead Posts: 28member
    IN short, you can use iWeb without .Mac, but you don't get the auto-slide show feature. You just need to save your site to file instead of .Mac and then upload it to a different server using Fetch any number of different apps. If your provider is like mine, he offered me 10 megs of disk space, I can fill that in an afternoon. So I had a choice, pay my provider for more space, or pay Apple for more space. I think that's what the Apple store employee meant to say.



    In any case, there is another thread where people show off their iWeb pages, that discusses the whole issue to death. You might want to look it up. Somewhere in that thread I have links to both my .Mac, iWeb+.Mac and iWeb + another server pages. I don't think you'll notice a lot of difference, accept the slide show in iWeb + .Mac is an auto slideshow on a nice black background. The slide shows in the others are on white backgrounds, and you have to click on an arrow to see the next slide. If there are other differences I either can't think of them or am not aware of them.
  • Reply 2 of 7
    Thanks .... very helpful.
  • Reply 3 of 7
    SpamSandwichSpamSandwich Posts: 31,087member
    If you are pretty much a novice to Mac, .mac will help ease the transition and help you get something on the web fast. As you move up the ladder, you'll start to feel constrained by Apple's templates and want to try something else.
  • Reply 4 of 7
    normheadnormhead Posts: 28member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by SpamSandwich View Post


    If you are pretty much a novice to Mac, .mac will help ease the transition and help you get something on the web fast. As you move up the ladder, you'll start to feel constrained by Apple's templates and want to try something else.



    I've been using a Mac since 94, and have never felt any need to move "up the ladder" whatever that means. You make it sound like it's inevitable. I'm sure many people never feel the need to move beyond iWeb and .Mac, in fact i ditched Dreamweaver for iWeb, because it simplifies my life.
  • Reply 5 of 7
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by normhead View Post


    I've been using a Mac since 94, and have never felt any need to move "up the ladder" whatever that means. You make it sound like it's inevitable. I'm sure many people never feel the need to move beyond iWeb and .Mac, in fact i ditched Dreamweaver for iWeb, because it simplifies my life.





    Well, if you want to make any money, or break the design that Apple offers to you, your going to have to use something else. Dropping Dreamweaver for iWeb seems a bit weird, being that Dreamweaver is industry standard and can complete any project within it. If you knew Dreamweaver, why would you goto something that doesn't come close to what it can do. iWeb from what I have seen (I have never used it for more than 5 minutes) is very very limited to what it can handle. If your just updating your own page and you don't need anything complex, I guess use iWeb (if you like a template). If your looking to go out and find some websites to do, or you don't want to use their templates, wrong move.
  • Reply 6 of 7
    normheadnormhead Posts: 28member
    "Well, if you want to make any money, or break the design that Apple offers to you, your going to have to use something else."



    Your mistake is in thinking that most people want to make money. I dropped dreamweaver for iWeb, because, 1. none of my sites are designed to make money (well one is but that's another story)

    2. The ease of iWeb is worth more to me than the flexibility of Dreamweaver



    I used to teach Comm Tech. and taught dreamweaver. If your livlelyhood depends on your web pages being creative different, eyecatching, unusual, then use dreamweaver by all means. But if your message is more important to you, use iWeb. And hire someone to use dreamweaver or learn it yourself if you do need the extra flash at some point, if by some chnace you do end up making money. But I bet 9 out of 10 Mac users will never need more than the capabilites of iWeb.



    I started using Photoshop in version 2.0 and will probably always use photoshop. But I have a friend who sells stuff on ebay and he's quite happy with Graphic Converter. We were both pro photographers so don't even start on the differnt skill level thing. Most high end programs have way more capability than the average user will ever need. And learning them, for the average user, would be a waste of time. That's why people pay guys like you to do their web pages for them.
  • Reply 7 of 7
    progmacprogmac Posts: 1,850member
    I'm on board with you, normhead. I've long since ditched more complicated and flexible tools for the simplicity of iWeb. Then again, i don't make web pages for a living. I've maintained web sites off and on since the 90s, but today I am not willing to spend more than 1 or 2 minutes in the procedures of updating
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