Did anyone see Tuesday's article in WSJ about the iphone?

Posted:
in Future Apple Hardware edited January 2014
It said companies are refusing to support Apple's IMAP protocol, claining it's a security risk. What's this about?

Comments

  • Reply 1 of 18
    davegeedavegee Posts: 2,765member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Ptrash View Post


    It said companies are refusing to support Apple's IMAP protocol, claining it's a security risk. What's this about?



    Apples IMAP protocol?!?! Where was I when Apple took control over the ITEF... It woulda made slashdot wouldn't it?!?!



    But anyway...



    Of-course IMAP is a security risk.... E-V-E-R-B-O-D-Y knows that if you wanna be secure it's MS Exchange & Outlook or it's nuthin...



    Dave
  • Reply 2 of 18
    kickahakickaha Posts: 8,760member
    Wow, that's up there with "Apple's AAC" for poor fact checking and FUD.
  • Reply 3 of 18
    davegeedavegee Posts: 2,765member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Kickaha View Post


    Wow, that's up there with "Apple's AAC" for poor fact checking and FUD.



    Remember that famous slogan... "All the news that fits, we print!"



    Dave
  • Reply 4 of 18
    aisiaisi Posts: 134member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by DaveGee View Post


    Apples IMAP protocol?!?!



    To their credit the WSJ never talked about "Apple's IMAP protocol" in Tuesday's article.



    Quote:

    A business email system can use a popular email standard known as IMAP to sync with an iPhone. While many large companies have the ability to activate IMAP, they have chosen not to because they are worried about exposing their mail servers to the public. [?] Even some companies that have activated IMAP for external traffic don't want their employees using iPhones on their network.



  • Reply 5 of 18
    michaelbmichaelb Posts: 242member
    Is Gmail considered secure?



    I've found myself using Gmail more and more, particularly for having various other email accounts fed into it. (Either through forwarding or the very neat ability of Gmail to do its own server checking for up to 5 accounts.)



    It works well enough even on a Windows Mobile 5 device, so presumably it would work superbly through Safari on the iPhone.



    It's a trivial matter getting email fed into Gmail, so if it was regarded as secure, this could be a good solution.
  • Reply 6 of 18
    onlookeronlooker Posts: 5,252member
    Isn't Yahoo the supported mail on iPhone? (free iPhone mail that is)
  • Reply 7 of 18
    elronelron Posts: 126member
    If companies are afraid to expose their email servers to the public, why does every business person have a BlackBerry? I honestly don't know how BlackBerry push email works, but wouldn't it require servers that are accessible from the Internet? Is RIM's protocol that much more secure than IMAP?
  • Reply 8 of 18
    slewisslewis Posts: 2,080member
    Null.
  • Reply 9 of 18
    onlookeronlooker Posts: 5,252member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Ptrash View Post


    It said companies are refusing to support Apple's IMAP protocol, claining it's a security risk. What's this about?



    Funny thing is the iPhone supports IMAP, and POP. AFAIK that's about 99% of email.
  • Reply 10 of 18
    ptrashptrash Posts: 296member
    I guess that's how rumor's get spread, "Apple's email protocol".



    What I meant to say was the IMAP protocol Apple is using on the I-phone. Which yoiu're saying is only one of the protocols the phone supports.



    I guess my real question relates to the protocols corporations support: Blackberry, exchange, etc.



    Did corporations immediately support Blackberry, i.e. did Blackberry approach companies to get them on board, or did blackberry users reach a stauration point that forced companies to deal with their presence.



    I imagine MS is different, since they got on the corporate treadmill early on with IBM's PC.
  • Reply 11 of 18
    lfe2211lfe2211 Posts: 507member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by elron View Post


    If companies are afraid to expose their email servers to the public, why does every business person have a BlackBerry? I honestly don't know how BlackBerry push email works, but wouldn't it require servers that are accessible from the Internet? Is RIM's protocol that much more secure than IMAP?



    I posted this on another thread.



    Here's a nice brief overview of BB security implemented thru its Enterprise Server (BES).



    http://na.blackberry.com/eng/ataglan...y/features.jsp
  • Reply 12 of 18
    joeyyyjoeyyy Posts: 35member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Ptrash View Post


    It said companies are refusing to support Apple's IMAP protocol, claiming it's a security risk. What's this about?



    This thread reminded me of an article I read today: http://roughlydrafted.com/RD/RDM.Tec...1E046A397.html

    It does a good job dispelling the iPhone's mythes and apple-hater arguments as well as describes the true challenges facing the iPhone. Very interesting reading in my opinion.



    iPhone's applicability for enterprise e-mail is mentioned there too:



    Quote:

    Gartner recently made headlines when analyst Ken Dulaney explained, “We’re telling IT executives to not support [the iPhone] because Apple has no intentions of supporting [iPhone use in] the enterprise.”



    How exactly is Apple failing to support the iPhone for business users?



    1. Is Apple providing only a proprietary platform for custom development, locking companies to a single vendor?



    2. Is Apple only supporting its own proprietary email system, locking companies to a single email server option?



    No, that would be Microsoft's Windows Mobile! But Gartner doesn't warn people not to buy Microsoft's products. That's outside of its core competency.



    Gartner’s problem with the iPhone is that it “only” supports industry standard IMAP and POP mail, including Push IMAP support offered by Yahoo. That means enterprise customers will be forced to use open standards, standards that are already supported by Lotus Notes and Microsoft Exchange Server. Oh no, a level playing field!



    btw, here is some information about IMAP which is the open standard for Mail: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/IMAP
  • Reply 13 of 18
    lfe2211lfe2211 Posts: 507member
    Thanks for the RD link joeYYY. It's very well done and answers many questions I've had for some time about the lack of impartiality by Gartner, IDG, CNET and ZDnet. Daniel Eran of RD is a first class internet journalist.
  • Reply 14 of 18
    hirohiro Posts: 2,663member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by lfe2211 View Post


    Thanks for the RD link joeYYY. It's very well done and answers many questions I've had for some time about the lack of impartiality by Gartner, IDG, CNET and ZDnet. Daniel Eran of RD is a first class internet journalist.



    Eran isn't a journalist. He is a first class blogger. Big difference.



    Despite what many folks think, bloggers have no express responsibility to report factually correct information. They can say whatever they want just like mainstream media can on editorially based outlets. And those mainstream editorially based outlets aren't journalism either, just partisan drivel normally.



    Sometimes he's a bit over the top, but I enjoy reading his stuff occasionally. He does infuse every article with his own strong opinions, definitely not a journalistic trait, but a fine one for a consultant using a blog as his main interface to the world. I hope it works and he comfortably pays his bills, but that doesn't make him or any other blogger an automatic journalist.
  • Reply 15 of 18
    9secondko9secondko Posts: 929member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by DaveGee View Post


    Apples IMAP protocol?!?! Where was I when Apple took control over the ITEF... It woulda made slashdot wouldn't it?!?!



    But anyway...



    Of-course IMAP is a security risk.... E-V-E-R-B-O-D-Y knows that if you wanna be secure it's MS Exchange & Outlook or it's nuthin...



    Dave



    while IMAP poses its own issues, everybody knows that Exchange and Outlook are their own security risks. The company I last worked for found this out the hard way!



    There are other (more secure) options. Not many, but they are there. It's all about what the IT dept. beleives in.
  • Reply 16 of 18
    lfe2211lfe2211 Posts: 507member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Hiro View Post


    Eran isn't a journalist. He is a first class blogger. Big difference.



    Despite what many folks think, bloggers have no express responsibility to report factually correct information. They can say whatever they want just like mainstream media can on editorially based outlets. And those mainstream editorially based outlets aren't journalism either, just partisan drivel normally.



    Sometimes he's a bit over the top, but I enjoy reading his stuff occasionally. He does infuse every article with his own strong opinions, definitely not a journalistic trait, but a fine one for a consultant using a blog as his main interface to the world. I hope it works and he comfortably pays his bills, but that doesn't make him or any other blogger an automatic journalist.



    I respect your opinion Hiro but there are many individuals who call themselves "journalists" but more precisely fit your definition of internet blogger-- bloggers have no express responsibility to report factually correct information. . Can you say frequent CNBC guest expert, MarketWatch's John Dvorak?



    In todays electronic world combined with a near-death classical print media, the distinction between journalist and blogger is becoming very blurred. Not wanting to get into a semantic argument with you on this issue, I'll just say that I respect (not necessarily agree with) anyone who:



    1-expresses a point of view (strongly or not) which is supported by verifiable documentation,

    2-demonstrates some semblance of professionalism in reporting with consideration for truth and balance, and

    3- adheres to an ethical standard that I think is fair and honest.



    For the most part, I think Eran's writing adheres to these criteria.



    However one labels him, is not relevant to me.
  • Reply 17 of 18
    aisiaisi Posts: 134member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by lfe2211 View Post


    For the most part, I think Eran's writing adheres to these criteria.



    I think he's about as fair and balanced as Paul Thurrott. That is to say: totally one-sided.
  • Reply 18 of 18
    slewisslewis Posts: 2,080member
    Null.
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