Refreshing the dock without killing it?!

Posted:
in Genius Bar edited January 2014
Long story, but basically I need to be able to force the dock to update all of its icons either through the terminal or applescript. I am currently accomplishing this by killing the Dock process, but this also causes the dashboard to restart, and also the desktop picture (if it is set to change periodically).



Is there no way around this? Any terminal command for closing and reopening the dock without closing and reopening the Dock 'application'?



Thanks

Comments

  • Reply 1 of 5
    kareliakarelia Posts: 525member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by G_Warren View Post


    Long story, but basically I need to be able to force the dock to update all of its icons either through the terminal or applescript. I am currently accomplishing this by killing the Dock process, but this also causes the dashboard to restart, and also the desktop picture (if it is set to change periodically).



    Is there no way around this? Any terminal command for closing and reopening the dock without closing and reopening the Dock 'application'?



    Thanks



    Not really. The closest thing is to use Activity Monitor to force-quit the Dock, but that will essentially kill it, just like Terminal. Mind if I ask why it's necessary?
  • Reply 2 of 5
    g_warreng_warren Posts: 713member
    Thanks for confirming what I thought.



    I have a small app that update iCal's icon, so I need to force the dock to refresh it. I'll just need to go with killing the Dock process, and put up with the Dashboard restarting.
  • Reply 3 of 5
    kareliakarelia Posts: 525member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by G_Warren View Post


    Thanks for confirming what I thought.



    I have a small app that update iCal's icon, so I need to force the dock to refresh it. I'll just need to go with killing the Dock process, and put up with the Dashboard restarting.



    Is it something like making the iCal icon display the current date, rather than July 17th, without having to constantly run the program?



    Because that's bitchin'.
  • Reply 4 of 5
    karl kuehnkarl kuehn Posts: 756member
    It might work to send the Dock the "HUP" signal. I just tried it and it did kill the Dock, but I don't know about the rest. Here is the command:



    killall -HUP Dock
  • Reply 5 of 5
    MarvinMarvin Posts: 14,177moderator
    I think this is what Docklets are for. I've only ever used one but it was for notifying me of the status of the classic environment way back before it had a menubar item.
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