Linksys Routers have taken a dive in quality...

Posted:
in Current Mac Hardware edited January 2014
Is it me or has the latest WRT54G routers taken a dive in quality? I had two Version 2 or 3 routers take a nose dive this week at two separate locations. No big deal.



Went and purchased new routers. Version 8 this time.



Making changes is horrible and changes have to be done one at a time. I am thinking about purchasing an airport extreme at this point.



So, is it me or is Linksys on a downward slide or what? It seems D-Link has really come on and Netgear stuff seems pretty nice these days.

Comments

  • Reply 1 of 10
    I had really bad luck with some of the NetGear firmware. It was really poor in comparison to the Linksys firmware. I have the SRX200 which has been the most solid consumer wireless device I've ever used. It has been on since June 30th or thereabouts, and I haven't needed to restart it once.
  • Reply 2 of 10
    My WRT54G works just fine. I've had it since early this year.
  • Reply 3 of 10
    aplnubaplnub Posts: 2,586member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by teedoff087 View Post


    My WRT54G works just fine. I've had it since early this year.



    Does it have an S at the end and what version is it?



    Is it setup for a Static IP internet address? This is where my problems are basically coming from the setup of the new router. The older ones were rock solid but these new ones suck. I am having to make changes one at a time or the router won't make the change.
  • Reply 4 of 10
    aplnubaplnub Posts: 2,586member
    I just installed the Extreme N base station. Installation was relatively painless although it is more confusing to me than the Linksys but it works as advertised and maybe then some. So for now, the AE+N ports is working for me just fine.
  • Reply 5 of 10
    I personally would stay the hell away from Apple wireless routers. APX's are known to fail readily. They also cost more than competition typically does. Maybe try D-Link. They have the best speeds (at least their n products) and are made by a company that produces, exclusively, networking gear.
  • Reply 6 of 10
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by aplnub View Post


    Does it have an S at the end and what version is it?



    Is it setup for a Static IP internet address? This is where my problems are basically coming from the setup of the new router. The older ones were rock solid but these new ones suck. I am having to make changes one at a time or the router won't make the change.



    It's setup for static IPs, but mine's not a SpeedBooster model (no S on the end). I have the regular WRT54G Ver. 6 with the latest firmware. I don't have any of those problems.
  • Reply 7 of 10
    The Linksys WRT54G used to be the router of choice by hackers when it first came out. This was mainly because of two reasons, first, it had removable antennas. Hackers could replace them with high gain antennas to setup wireless hotspots, and even use large directional antennas to communicate with others across town. Second, they used the Linux operating system. This allowed the firmware to be changed to add additional functionality such as Quality of Service, Load Balancing, Wireless Mesh, etc.



    However, this changed. Starting with version 4, Linksys reduced the RAM from 32MB to 16MB and reduced the flash memory from 8MB to 4MB. Then, with version 5, they stopped using Linux and switched to a proprietary firmware--although the graphical user interface looks the same, the engine underneath is different. In addition, with version 8, the antennas are no longer removable.



    After a large number of complaints, Linksys came out with the WRT54GL, the "L" at the end meaning Linux. This is essentially a repackaging of their version 3 router. It has 32MB of RAM, 8MB of flash memory, and uses the Linux OS. Therefore, your version 3 router is probably the most valuable of the three routers you own.



    The high end Asus WL500 and Buffalo routers have now become more favored by the hacker community. They have more RAM, flash memory, removable antennas, plus USB ports for a network hard drive. Here are a few links with more information about the WRT54G.



    WRT54G Wikipedia

    WRT54G Wi-fi Planet

    Turn your $60 router into a $600 router
  • Reply 8 of 10
    aplnubaplnub Posts: 2,586member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Tipton View Post


    The Linksys WRT54G used to be the router of choice by hackers when it first came out. This was mainly because of two reasons, first, it had removable antennas. Hackers could replace them with high gain antennas to setup wireless hotspots, and even use large directional antennas to communicate with others across town. Second, they used the Linux operating system. This allowed the firmware to be changed to add additional functionality such as Quality of Service, Load Balancing, Wireless Mesh, etc.



    However, this changed. Starting with version 4, Linksys reduced the RAM from 32MB to 16MB and reduced the flash memory from 8MB to 4MB. Then, with version 5, they stopped using Linux and switched to a proprietary firmware--although the graphical user interface looks the same, the engine underneath is different. In addition, with version 8, the antennas are no longer removable.



    After a large number of complaints, Linksys came out with the WRT54GL, the "L" at the end meaning Linux. This is essentially a repackaging of their version 3 router. It has 32MB of RAM, 8MB of flash memory, and uses the Linux OS. Therefore, your version 3 router is probably the most valuable of the three routers you own.



    The high end Asus WL500 and Buffalo routers have now become more favored by the hacker community. They have more RAM, flash memory, removable antennas, plus USB ports for a network hard drive. Here are a few links with more information about the WRT54G.



    WRT54G Wikipedia

    WRT54G Wi-fi Planet

    Turn your $60 router into a $600 router



    It appears after looking into this that V8 routers have big problems.



    I would also like to state that using DHCP with Manual address causes problems with the routers and Leopard using the Linksys V8. I believe I may go the way of the Buffalo at work. My APX is doing great and exactly what I need it to do. The AE unit is flaky on extending my wireless, as I can't get it to do it without totall knocking out the Wireless network, but all I use it for is to stream my iTunes over the ethernet anyway so no big deal. But this router situation at work is pissing me off and then, Apple changes the Firewall setup in Leopard. I have honestly thought about going back to Tiger on my last backup because of the firewall debacle.
  • Reply 9 of 10
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Tipton View Post


    After a large number of complaints, Linksys came out with the WRT54GL, the "L" at the end meaning Linux. This is essentially a repackaging of their version 3 router. It has 32MB of RAM, 8MB of flash memory, and uses the Linux OS. Therefore, your version 3 router is probably the most valuable of the three routers you own.



    I thought that the WRT54GL came with the crappy linksys software and then you had to flash the DDWRT onto it if you wanted linux. I am pretty sure of that as I am looking at my router info page (192.168.1.1) and it has the linksys junk on it. (I haven't put linux on it yet due to the painful experience from last time...)
  • Reply 10 of 10
    All of the Linksys routers have the Linksys software on it and they all look the same. However, some of them are based on Linux and some are based on a proprietary OS, they just kept the same user interface to keep consistency between each version. In order to modify any of the routers, the whole firmware has to be flashed, so if you're going to make changes, then whatever is initially on there is almost irrelevant.
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